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Yachts in Rough Seas

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by PacBlue, Mar 6, 2020.

  1. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    There are lots of marketing videos of yachts running in smooth calms seas, pretty to look at but I like to see the footage of when the weather pics up. Here is a good example when the weather turns:



    Would like to see more of this, commercial, naval and cruise ships need not apply.
  2. DBowman78

    DBowman78 Senior Member

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    Here's one of Kogo:
  3. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    That was great, 2 things:
    That pilothouse is really far forward on Kogo and man, that takes a lot of nerve/skill to get a Pilot Boat that close, too bad we did not see the transfer of the Pilot Captain to the megayacht.
  4. jsschieff

    jsschieff Member

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    Interesting to see how these yachts with traditional, flared bows take big head seas. The flare clearly keeps the bows from plunging dangerously deep. I wonder how modern plum bow or scythe bow yachts with little flare cope with rough seas like in the videos?
  5. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    I wonder the same. Naval architects got away from those types of bows years ago for better heavy seas seakeeping albeit at the expense of higher slamming loads.

    Then the designers/stylists brought back the plumb bows and while they have lower bow accelerations they must be wetter than a blown fire hydrant, better have a heavy duty wiper system onboard. Would love to see video of them in seas like above.
  6. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    If you search threads on YF from the mid to late-2000s, I think you'll find our members may have influenced current design trends, such as plumb bow benefits. :)

    Good videos above. A reminder that we're all at mercy of the sea.
  7. GhostriderIII

    GhostriderIII Senior Member

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    Looks like a **** hobby horse. Note the commercial ship in the background - 17-28 sec - not trying to max out his engines - quartering the waves, like we normally do.
  8. gr8trn

    gr8trn Senior Member

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    It would be cool to see recreational boats in more conditions. Sail and motor. Maybe it takes too much time and money to get all of the right conditions and gear in place.
    This is a decent test condition of a popular manufacturer that is more like reasonable conditions that one would be encountering with decent weather routing and decision making.
  9. cleanslate

    cleanslate Senior Member

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    I always think the same thing, no matter the boat. How does it REALLY perform. Pretty much all boats look great in calm seas. Or even worse at the dock.
  10. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    I've gone on many sea trials with buyers, and I think the brokers hated me. They'd always try to run in flat seas and I always pushed for rough. If nothing else I'd find wakes to cross at bad angles. That boat in the first video was running nice. The 2nd one? Yeah, hobby horse is a good description. It almost looked like the fault of that bulbous bow.
  11. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Always worked for who was paying me; Good ride for the owner, he is paying me for a safe ride and make his ship look good.
    Hard ride for the purchaser who wants those windows to rattle and still have a safe ride.
    I mostly worked for the owner, All my boats sold...

    BTW; Hello NYSkippy123.
  12. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

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    My most recent sea trial on the buy, owner had no idea of my intent to gut and refurbish to the gills. He ordered up a cook with a really nice lunch served aboard while we trialed. My surveyor was in the engine room weeds, knowing full well that my aim was to have reliance upon major propulsion items, not nuance items. Surveyor knew I was going to tear her down. I knew Hargrave boat was well designed structurally. I enjoyed my lunch. I kicked hard at out-of-water, and knew he'd choose to close. Fun day. We were tearing her apart on the hard before escrow even cleared.

    Thread brought back a fun memory.
  13. ApreMare

    ApreMare Senior Member

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    I’ve seen the Gene machine roughs seas video before and I’m glad someone started this thread. My question is during a crossing like that what does the crew do with all the hundreds of loose furniture items, decor objects etc. Just imagine a showcase on a mag of a yacht like that and try to remember all the stuff you see and imagine that yacht running in rough conditions with all those items. Would love to know from someone in the business. I’ ve chartered many times albeit never a yacht that big, but also never did a crossing longer than 2-3 hours and not with rough seas. Thanks for all the replies, stay healthy.
  14. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    If it can fly, roll or slide it gets wedged in and tied down. Transports aren't fancy no matter how fancy the boat.
  15. chesapeake46

    chesapeake46 Senior Member

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    I have wondered this too. When I see a yacht with a dining room table with 12 chairs & a chandelier I wonder where do they put the stuff ?
    Not like they are folding chairs and a card table.
  16. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

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    My theory is that good design, be it architecture or interior, doesn't require the layers upon layers of pillows, decor accessories, etc. Good furniture design is appealing to the eye as well as comfort. Show me a sofa with a myriad of pillows, and I'll show you a designer who struggled to introduce color, or worse, a furniture maker who specialized in form over function.

    That being said, so many large yachts are overwhelmed with our home-life creature comforts. Watched a crew this fall spend three days preparing a gal for the annual NY to FL trek, taking down pictures, mirrors, televisions, bundling pillows and tables, all in preparation for the relocation.
  17. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    The cross over of goods from land based structures to the yacht design world has killed off the functionality and seakeeping of yachts, trendy designers rule all the others can only drool
  18. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Although all cabinets will generally have locks they sometime don't hold. Moved a 60' Sunseeker down to Fl. once and the owner loved to eat. He had the 2 fridges packed. First day out we hit rough seas. Those fridges blew open and kept blowing open. What a mess. Duct tape is a wonderful thing.
  19. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

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    Saw similar when I was operating a Johnson 70 fifteen years ago:
    Owner said I could take it out as much as wanted, invited my wife for cruise around the harbor in Fort Lauderdale, then a quick spin out the inlet in light conditions: Noisy downstairs, sent wifey down to investigate: The dishwasher had come lose and ripped across the floor boards. (Secured it, no further damage)
    The plasma TV jammed and numerous other headaches, boat was not commissioned right, or built by a questionable yard, or both.
  20. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    I've had several owners offer me their boats, and that's one of the big reason I always said No thanks.