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Working as an engineer on a yacht

Discussion in 'Licensing & Education' started by tucker0104, Aug 27, 2013.

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  1. tucker0104

    tucker0104 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Charlotte
    Good morning, I grew up on the water and sailed quite a bit, worked in the navy for 8 1/2 years as a nuclear operator on a submarine, have a nuclear engineering license, and have no work as an operator at a nuclear power plant for 5 years. I have certifications in HVAC a diesel mechanics. I am one day (as soon as my house is paid off) wanting to get into the yachting world as a engineer or 2nd engineer. How do I go about getting started in that? What kind of certifications do I need? What does a typical engineer make (I know it depends on the size of the boat)? Is it hard to transition from a chief engineer to a captain? Thanks in advance for the advice.
  2. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,320
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    Visit the USCG NMC website Home--United States Coast Guard National Maritime Center and have a good read of the FAQ and other documentation that can be found on that site. It pretty much leads you through the requirements to obtain the American certificates required to work on a large commercial yacht. You don't necessarily need any certificate to sail on a private yacht but there are very few US flag large yachts and the industry standard (such as it is) demands some level of certification. It is possible for you to obtain an MCA www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mgn_156_eng_yacht.pdf‎
    license but it will be limited to service on yachts only.

    Start collecting every training and sea time document you can get from the Navy. It may not be easy and before you submit anything, find a website that is populated by American ex-Navy sailors looking to obtain USCG certificates. It is against forum rules to post a link to a competitive site but if you send me a PM I can provide one where you can do a productive search on this issue and contact people who have done what you are thinking about.

    You are entering a thick forest of regulations and a culture that is difficult to comprehend much less explain. It is fun though and pays far more than any economist could ever begin to rationalize.

    Chief engineer to captain? Have you no dignity or self respect?
  3. Kels

    Kels New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Norfolk, Va.
    18 year veteran still active usn

    I am active duty Navy. I had the chance to use my navy sea time to obtain a 2nd A/E steam and diesel also DDE unlimited. The only thing the navy did for me was give the sea time required, drug test, medical physical,and actually hands on experience. It took me about a year to get my license the uscg requires many pre requisite courses. What I didnt get was the national maritime center does not recognize US Navy firefighting. I had to take this out on town. Basically you have a big hill to climb. I crammed 12 engineering exams in four daya and failed one. They expect you to be the jack of all trades as a merchant marine. There is no seperate rating. I am an enginman chief petty officer but also they want me to be a DC, EM,BM, and an MM all in one. The task was daunting but I never gave up. I have 2 years left in the USN and I should be a first engineer When I retire at 20. Good puck shipmate.