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Wing Engine Discussion

Discussion in 'Technical Discussion' started by Crglmb, Aug 15, 2009.

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Which engine do you prefer for this application?

  1. Yanmar

    22.2%
  2. Lugger

    72.2%
  3. Phasor Marine-Kubota

    5.6%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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    The only fly in that ointment is that suspended water or water in solution at levels less than around 500 ppm are impossible to detect with the probe type continuity devices like you see fitted to famous filter bowls. What level of contamination they figure is "problematic" I don't know and they aren't talking but I doubt if it is below a few thousand ppm, and that level is enough to destroy pumps and injectors.
  2. wdrzal

    wdrzal Senior Member

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    Location:
    Baltimore
    I'm sure this was a slip,technically water and oil are not miscible or immicible, so suspended water in oil is a Emulsion, not water in solution. If water was "in solution" with the oil it would be much harder to seperate.
  3. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    There is no argument over that, but:

    Two forms of water can be present in fuels: dissolved or suspended as tiny droplets that range in size between 0.1 µm to 10 µm in diameter. This size is so small that it cannot be visually detected except when a highly concentrated haze is formed. The free water is suspended as an emulsion. The more stable the emulsion, the more difficult it is to remove the water. Factors that affect water removal from a water/fuel mixture include interfacial tension, viscosity, relative density and temperature.

    The fuel/water mixture's temperature can also affect separation efficiency. As temperature increases the IFT decreases, lowering the water droplets' size. In addition, fuels saturated with water at high temperatures can contain a high concentration of dissolved water, which cannot be removed by liquid/liquid coalescers. As the temperature decreases, the water falls out of solution into a suspended state and can then be removed by a liquid/liquid coalescer.

    Above points extracted from: http://www.pall.com/Aerospace_3255.asp

    If you are cooling your return fuel flow from the engines and the cooler leaks the fuel it comes into contact with is pretty warm having just come from cooling and lubricating the injectors, the volumes of return fuel varies with engine types but the old two stroke GM's and the bigger CATS pump about 60/70% of the fuel that goes to the engine back to the tank
  4. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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  5. diesel one

    diesel one New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    Messages:
    42
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Luger Engines

    The basic engine comes from John Deere. Luger "marineizes" it with new parts such as intake and exhast headers, exhast, pullies, belts, etc.

    Lugger is made by Northern Lights in Seattle, WA. They actually put the engines together, and I think it is a domestic block, but I am not positive on that.

    Eric