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What is wrong with old 48 Hats

Discussion in 'Hatteras Yacht' started by Capt Ralph, Oct 24, 2014.

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  1. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    A friend of mine is window shopping for an older sport fish. He keeps asking why the mid to late 80s, Hatteras, 48 is so cheap. Got me to thinking also. From $89.5 to 185k, I can find 8 on the web in a simple search.

    Seems all have the 8v92s from mild to wild HP ratings, with / without full towers, but a heck of a $ range between them and other year models. Is this the boat that has been commented on with the fuel tank forward?

    Comments or thoughts for the window shoppers?
  2. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    The 8V92's (why are the numbers smaller case?) lurking in the bilge might be the cause for most.
  3. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    It's hard to explain sometimes that the 92s are a pain, not forgiving, expensive and still I remain a 71 fan.
  4. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    It's no different for the 45, 46, 50 and 52 Hatteras Convertibles. Mid to late 80's models are in the $80K -$180K range with a few pushing past $200K either because of refit or an unrealistic seller.

    There is not a boat that is harder to sell than a late 1970's to late 198o's sportfisher with Detroit Diesel power. Sportfish Buyer's don't want to spend a bunch of dough maintaining old boats with old systems and two stroke motors.

    These older boats cost more to operate and maintain today than thay did when they were new. $50K per year to operate a $100K boat usually doesn't work for Buyers in that price range. Which is why most of the older sportfishers are sold to dreamers - guys who buy in cheap but hardly ever leave the dock.

    The guys who are left that can afford to burn $2000 in fuel to drive a 50' sportfisher around all day, buy newer boats.
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2014
  5. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    They were a PITA in the automotive on and off road applications I saw them on years ago. I was a real fan of the good old almost indestructible 6 71 N, we did quite a few truck re powers with these fellas and the Owners had some outstanding runs with them, the same could not be said for those who went for the 8V71 option over Cummins or Rolls in their prime movers. I think as did many others think that a lot of the problems came from a Vee engine under a cab designed for a straight one as a lot of the failures were heat related. Even worse of course was the 8V53 but that's a whole other story.
  6. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    There is something about the 53s. Finicky & temperamental lil $%^ stuffs. But when they're running right, they can be sweet.
  7. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    So, Am I remembering something from a bad dream or another brand; Fuel tank forward of the ER causing bow heavy till a lot of the fuel was burned off?
  8. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    I don't think their price isn't so much affected by the dependability of 92's vs 71's or 53's, but more by the fact that so many of them were used in the charter fleet. That's a lot of wear. Also, they're from an age when an 16kt to 20kt cruise speed was acceptible for a SF. Today's SF owners want to run at 26kt-30kts +.
  9. Caltexflanc

    Caltexflanc Senior Member

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    Is there another boat of that type from that era and that size range that sells for more?

    As for the 92's, as a former owner of a pair of 650hp that surveyed beautifully after 3000 hours, the mythology is due to the grossly pumped up units, HP wise. Parts and service are easy to get and in seven years prior to that survey I didn't spend any more time and money on them then any conscientious owner I knew of other brands did.
  10. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    They
    No, not really. Most comps also have Detroit Diesel power. Viking, Bertram, Hatteras, Ocean, all used primarily Detroit Diesels in that era.

    Today's buyers don't distinguish much between 92 and 71 series... they hate them both. Personally, I'm not on the 'I hate DD' team, however in the world of brokerage sportfishers it is a reality.

    Motor Yacht buyers tend to be a little more open to them because they typically run less hours and slower speeds than a sportfisher. They see how much more boat they can buy with DD engines.
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2014
  11. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Agreed, but the problems with older SF (and MY's) is you can't get them financed. The cost of ownership and fuel is high compared to what it used to be. Heck, I've seen a 5 gallon bucket of oil go from $32 to $90 in 10 years. Buyers have figured out they can buy a 7-10 year old SF for not a heck of a lot more a month at 4% interest and get a lot more in technology and even less in monthly maintanence expenses. The price of doing majors or an entire repaint is almost the cost of what the boat is worth on say a 53' Hatteras SF.
  12. P46-Curaçao

    P46-Curaçao Senior Member

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    Don’t you forget the write-off, of a new(er) boat, and the obligation to use ‘certified’ dealer(s) for maintenance, etc, etc. That could be far more expansive than some extra maintenance and renewals.

    In my opinion, you must be the right person to own a specific boat, I bought 4 years ago a brand new one, but I’m more happy with my 1981 Post now, and it has nothing to do with money, I’m now more involved with my boat then before, so it’s the right one for me!
  13. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I agree. But there seem to be much less long term boat owners turn yacht owners and do it yourself types of guys that like the simplicity of older systems and detroits that don't have 100 wires running all over to black boxes......They like to look down at the display and see fuel burn, load, etc etc....on a little screen.....and alarm codes......and call somebody