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Wavepiercers, Trimarans, SWATH and such...

Discussion in 'General Catamaran Discussion' started by YachtForums, Jun 27, 2004.

  1. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    To kick this off, I submit Vaudrey Miller's 82' Wavepiercer.

    Designed by: Craig Loomes Design Group Ltd.

    Length overall: 25.0 m
    Length on waterline: 22.46 m
    Beam: 6.2 m
    Draft: 1.55 m
    Displacement (Light Ship) 50 tonnes
    Displacement (Heavy Ship) 81 tonnes
    Cruise Speed (mid load, 1950rpm) 20 knots
    Sprint Speed (Light ship) 25 knots
    Main engines 2 x 1300 horsepower diesel (MAN V12)
    Electrical Generation 2 x 25 kW, 400V 3 phase AC
    Fuel (integral) 2 x 10,000 litres

    Forward quarter running shot...

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  2. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    One hull is good. Two hulls are better. Three hulls are... too much? ;)

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  3. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Brain Piercing

    At least mine.
    What a fantastic, far-out design.
    Not for the faint-hearted.
    But what do we know about it - more fuel efficient, seakindly, and smoother ride?
  4. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    I see your dual-sponsoned Wave Piercer...

    ..., and raise you another hull! ;)
    Dont know who or why (more deck space?) - but she's 152 feet long.

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  5. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    I can't even begin to theorize how this hull would handle in various sea conditions, i.e., following quartering seas, etc. However I can tell you that several offshore race hulls were produced in this configuration that did not work well for the application.

    I believe one was called the "Trident". Steve Stepp (Velocity fame) built two hulls like this. One was sold to Mike Novak, who successfully campaigned some cats in the 80's to a couple of World Championships. We've had a few drinks through the years and joked about this ridiculous hull he bought from Steve. Theoretically... it had some sound fundamentals. In reality... real world testing proved an extremely unpredictable hull that created a ride nearly as harsh as a cathedral hull.

    At displacement hull speeds, this concept could prove favorable for adaptation to yachts. Inherent stability being the most valuable asset, while still offering the interior accomodations of a true monohull and the ride quality of a narrow hull form.
  6. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    MILITARY Wave Piercer

    A derivative of INCAT's long-running series of fast ferries, she's the USAV Spearhead (second of three built for US Armed Forces together with Bollinger Shipyard in Lousiana) - hull#61!
    All-aluminum - duh! -- she cruises above 50knots! :p
    Interested, much more info here:
    http://www.incat.com.au/defence_fs.html
    Clearly, the technology is proven - if only in commercial & govt applications to date.

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    Last edited: Dec 9, 2004
  7. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    I am sure you have seen the Triton Trimaran as well, another version of big multihull boats, more like the 152´above...

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  8. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    I see your gigantic Trimaran. But...

    TRI THIS FOR SIZE!

    The “Benchijigua Express”

    When Austal signed a contract to build a second high speed vehicle-passenger ferry for European ferry operator Fred. Olsen, S.A. in June 2003 it signaled the start of not just another ferry from the world’s leading builder of high speed ships, but the creation of a new hullform that will revolutionise fast sea transportation by providing a significant improvement in seakeeping performance and passenger comfort over existing fast ferries.

    The 126.7 metre cargo-vehicle-passenger ferry “Benchijigua Express” is larger than any existing diesel-powered fast ferry – catamaran or monohull – and is the world’s largest all-aluminium ship. Ordered in June 2003 the ferry will sail at loaded speeds in excess of 40 knots, providing capacity for 1350 passengers, over 350 cars or 450 truck lane metres and 123 cars.

    Fred. Olsen, S.A. pioneered the use of large high-speed ferries in the Canary Islands and carries almost three million passengers, half a million cars and a quarter of a million cargo vehicles per year. It has been operating large fast catamarans since 1999, and while happy with the results, the company has identified some limitations in terms of capacity and especially passenger comfort when operating in rough seas.

    This led to the conclusion that further research was needed in order to develop a new concept for high-speed vessels combining the good comfort provided by the soft movement of monohulls, with the low resistance and very good stability and carrying capacity of catamarans.

    With these objectives in mind, Fred. Olsen, S.A. and Austal cooperated on an extensive programme of research, tank testing and other analysis to firstly develop a new design and then ensure it would meet Fred. Olsen, S.A.’s requirements in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The result is a slender stabilised monohull, more commonly referred to as a trimaran.

    The final report showed the trimaran would offer a 26% improvement in operability over compared hull forms. Encouraged by these early predictions there was a program of further design development including additional tank testing, the construction of an 11 metre manned technology demonstrator modeling the vessel’s structure in detail using sophisticated finite-element techniques.

    At the height of construction approximately 430 people were employed on the trimaran with construction taking 12 months plus two months for commissioning and sea trials.

    A major milestone in the construction of this remarkable ship was achieved in mid-July 2004 when the bow section, itself measuring some 32 metres in length, 15 metres high and weighing 120 tonnes, was moved out of its building hall and united with the main structure. This revealed the true size and scale of the ferry to the outside world for the first time.

    Following its launch on 25 September final onboard fitout was completed before sea trials during November and departure for the Canary Islands on a delivery voyage covering approximately 9,500 nautical miles.

    The completion of “Benchijigua Express” clearly demonstrates Austal’s ability to design and construct high-speed ships of the size required for current and future defence projects. A team led by General Dynamics and including Austal is offering the trimaran hullform for the US Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship project.

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  9. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Flying Fish - Prototype Trimaran

    Hmmm,...., I wonder if this boat was somehow related to this program.
    I am actually still interested in buying this one as a "commuter boat" if and when I get that job in Virginia Beach. (I simply refuse to drive over that bridge ever day).
    Purpose built, she set new standards for transporting four persons across rough water at high speed while minimizing slamming loads. The hull is built in a trimaran configuration. By limiting the beam of the center hull to 4.5 feet at the chine, using an extreme deadrise angle of 32 deg., slamming loads are reduced to 20% of those of a conventional monohull. The outer hulls serve to preserve stability.
    This project was initiated by Anadrome Design, LLC, in Sept. of 1999. The principal designer is Dick Newick who is famed for his OSTAR (transatlantic single handed) winning sailing trimarins. The chief engineer was Keith Burgess of Maine Composites. Consultants who have contributed to this design are Adrian Thompson, the designer of the VSV wave piercing craft in Great Britain and Harry Schoell Marine Design of Pompano Beach, Florida.

    In 2000, the full-scale prototype was built. A pretensioned monocoque aluminum alloy hull was computer-plasma cut in Canada by the jet boat racing champion, Rob Chrunyk, of Eagle Power Boats, and fabricated by Neil Malam of Aluminum Master in Clarkston, Washington. The construction combined state-of-the-art aluminum construction with composite panels. Since delivery of the boat for field testing in Maine in July of 2000, progressive experiments with differing engines, drives, and running surfaces have led to the boat presented at the Miami Boat Show of 2002.

    The current vessel is powered by a fresh-water-cooled, fuel-injected gasoline V-8 built and rigged by Innovation Marine of Sarasota, Fla., closely resembling the specifications of the endurance motors they build for the Navy SEALS. The propulsion system is a series 1750 surface drive from PSI of Pompano Beach, Fla.
    Cool, eh?
    :D

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  10. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Coming to a Theater of War near you?

    Might that somebody be the US Navy?
    See here:
    http://www.gizmo.com.au/go/3568/

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  11. EnigmaNZ

    EnigmaNZ Member

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    Here are some more wave piecers from the Craig Loomes design stable.

    http://www.cld.co.nz/welcome.htm

    Most of the Loomes WP Cats are quite beamy, the narrow designs were for owners who wanted to access narrow berths and waterways. The WP Tris are another story.
  12. Arniev

    Arniev Senior Member

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    U.S. Navy X-Craft

    Looks like the U.S. Navy is serious about these new ship designs:

    X-Craft / Littoral Surface Craft-Experimental (LSC(X)) Sea Fighter (FSF 1)

    Xcraft1.jpg

    Xcraft2.jpg

    Xcraft3.jpg

    (Source: globalsecurity.org)
    :)
  13. EnigmaNZ

    EnigmaNZ Member

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  14. EnigmaNZ

    EnigmaNZ Member

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    Here's some pics of the the Austral and Incat multihull mini carriers.

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  15. Garry Hartshorn

    Garry Hartshorn Senior Member

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    Incat were really the first to deal with this hull form and spent a lot of time and effort in figuring it out. To date I have yet to se another designer really get a good grip on how and why they work. Don't want to sound negative but if you compare an incat wavepiercer against any other design of the same size Incat's will out perform.
  16. carlnisbet

    carlnisbet New Member

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    Wavepiercers, sit well with me

    I'm confused, I've looked at many hull designs and the only one that has inspired me has been the wavepiercer. I was begining to think that you guys were holding out on me. Have I missed something? Is there a reason that this is the 1st time I've stumbled accross a thread about Wavepiercers?

    My intention would be to live and work onboard, for that I need a very stable, broard beam attractive vessel.

    I came accross . The "Spirit" 50 is a dream to behold for me. As far as I'm aware a 50 has not been built yet. I have never seen a wavepiercer in real life yet. The lack of popularaty has not detered my enthusiasam for this concept. I am keen to hear of anyone who has had practical experience with this type of vessel. I know that Gary worked on a big cat in Cairns.

    I would also value Lars opinion and design input, it would be for a yacht based in the sub tropics for most of the time. I fancy the idea of ABB Pods, no need for speed, smooth and quiet yes please.

    Thanks for the thread.

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  17. EnigmaNZ

    EnigmaNZ Member

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    On the site they say the Spirit is currently under contruction. If you can afford a '50' I would suggest you take a trip to the yards in NZ to check out the contruction and ask questions. They do welcome visitors. The Captains suite is enormous, the VIP is an appartment, all in 50m.

    I remember reading about the Spirit designs a number of years ago, I seem to recall they came out of Australia, as that was were I first saw them, when Tenix took over the Whangerei shipyards, the yard began advertised the Spirit series, or was that before tenix took over, hmm. I have a vague inpression it was originally from Incat. I thought of it at the time as a offshore version of the Craig Loomes WPs.

    http://www.newzealandyachts.com/index2.html

    Craig Loomes also has designs up to 52m as well, including some rather wicked looking trimarans.

    http://www.cld.co.nz/
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2006
  18. EnigmaNZ

    EnigmaNZ Member

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    Good god, just found this on the Craig Loomes site, a design study for a 151m trimaran megayacht. With unusual nacelles, all CL tris are designed to pierce waves with the whole hull, that could be quite spectacular from the bridge, passing through a wave and having it wash over the bridge windows.

    "23 Jun 2006. Sea trials of the revolutionary Earthrace design has done much to convince CLD of the benefits of the wavepiercer trimaran platform and enough to create this remarkable 151m superyacht design study. A motoryacht like no other, this monster boasts a sprint speed of 50 knots, a five level owner's suite, two huge VIP suites and six split-level apartments. Extraordinary features include the twin skylounges perched in the dramatic arching wings linking the twin 60m long sponsons. These viewing areas allow guests to sit in luxurious surroundings whilst watching the faraway centre hull bow and the much closer sponson bow majestically wavepiercing the ocean. As close to low level flying as you could get without an aircraft!"

    http://www.cld.co.nz/welcome.htm

    Click on 'Latest news' on the panel on the left.

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  19. YachtForum

    YachtForum YachtForums Publisher

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  20. Innomare

    Innomare Senior Member

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    monohull wavepearcer

    Another interesting one is the VSV (Very Slender Vessel) under construction at Multimarine in the UK. It's a wave piercer with only a central hull. Propulsion is through a single waterjet.

    http://www.multimarine.co.uk/sharp and pointy.html

    Take a look at the figures for speed and range...
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2006

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