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Update: Got our new boat! 2005 Cheoy Lee

Discussion in 'Cheoy Lee Yacht' started by Lili429, Feb 28, 2014.

  1. Lili429

    Lili429 Member

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    Hugging the Coast Adventure
    Oh ha ha. Here is another one

    Attached Files:

  2. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Guess I'll put my dreams of getting rich on game show winnings where I put my dreams of doing it through the lottery.:D

    The U.S. Power Squadron has some excellent courses. You could also take a course in diesel maintenance. I believe Borg Warner has a good course. In the mean time study knots and how a boat is tied up. Beyond that your best education will come on your boat, where it'll be most relevant, under your captain's eye. He'll be able to teach you boat handling and maintenance, reading the waters, etc.. Nothing beats OJT.
  3. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

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    Standing by. :)
  4. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

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    As Ed mentioned the Power Squadron is a good place to start. There are also some good resources online. I would pick a copy of Nigal Calder's book "Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual: How to Maintain, Repair, and Improve Your Boat's Essential Systems"

    http://www.amazon.com/Boatowners-Me...m_b_bsb_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=07MA84DRV2DAV5069CDD

    As well as perhaps a couple of his other books:

    http://www.amazon.com/Marine-Diesel...d_sim_b_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1VAZRPHHXJEDDG42SVY0

    How to Read a Nautical Chart, 2nd Edition (Includes ALL of Chart #1): A Complete Guide to Using and Understanding Electronic and Paper Charts: Nigel Calder: 9780071779821: Amazon.com: Books
  5. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Don't forget the most origional book that everyone should own "Chapman's school of seamanship"
  6. Old Phart

    Old Phart Senior Member

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    I dunno
    Legs getting tired, yet?
  7. lovinlifenc

    lovinlifenc Member

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    You should visit Mr Dashew's site and dowload the two pdf files containing electronic versions of his renowned books. One of his recent blog posts contains a link to download them free of charge.

    Good luck in your journey, and please report back with photos.

    Gentlemen, this type of user could potentially benefit all of us dreamers who want to make the same move that she is talking about. The reality is that people getting into yachting is the only thing that will sustain the industry that you are so passionate about.

    My biggest obstacle is my wife, who likes boating but needs to be convinced that yachting would be an enjoyable experience. It would be nice if I could email her a link to this thread, but that is not an option. Reading this entire thread would most likely give her the impression that the yachting world is an unfriendly place.
  8. Old Phart

    Old Phart Senior Member

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    Why not?

    Life is full of options.

    They are called choices.

    Email her this link:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jU4oA3kkAWU

    P.S.- Stolen from this Thread:

    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/g...554-bali-thai-style-houseboat.html#post193145
  9. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

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    Not any more. :)
  10. Lsquared

    Lsquared New Member

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    Checklist

    Lili429...Look at getting your captains license. That can give you basics, like rules of the road and navigation, reading charts and plotting. Before embarking on that long journey make sure you take that out in some dicey stuff. That is a journey of which when it gets rough you wont be able to say I want to get off. You are stuck in that ocean thru thick and thin, just be aware of what you are getting into. Then of course the pacific with long stretches without anywhere to stop as well when bypassing Mexico. Just google trawlers in rough seas, there are a plethora of videos you can watch to see of the stuff you could be in for. Of course all the planning that will have to go into a voyage of that nature is huge as well, planning is key.

    Congrats, enjoy your new adventure.
  11. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    ...and your plan for bypassing 2500 miles of Mexico's pacific coast is?
  12. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    I understand the intention of your post, but one needs to crawl before they run. A Basic Boating course is where you learn that stuff. For a captain's license you must already know that and a lot more, and be able to demonstrate that both through testing and verified sea time. Another thing one needs to realize when getting a Master's License is that you are expected to act as a professional. If anything ever happens, courts will likely hold you to a higher standard of liability.
  13. Lsquared

    Lsquared New Member

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  14. NEO56

    NEO56 Member

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    Hi Lili,
    Welcome to YF! It's so easy to get over enthusiastic especially when it's your first boat. First of all...that's a lot of boat for a first timer, and Choy Lee's have a unique set of problems. Spend your first few months staying close to your home port, until you can change the Oil a few times, and learn about your boats idiosyncrasy's. Like I always tell people, Boats are like Airplanes...if you get into trouble, you can't pull over to the side of the road and call AAA.

    And yes, a semi thick skin is required to be a member here, but I would hazard a guess, that there is millions of hours of experience here...and 90% of what I've read is accurate. (O.K. 90% may be pushing it a bit). I've been on and around boats all my life, and I'm getting ready to do my first and last new custom build. I'm hiring a Captain to help me the first few months getting familiar with all her systems and the maintenance of those systems. Running off half cocked, on a boat of that size is, for a newbie, a recipe for disaster. While I appreciate you being driven, it's best to acquire knowledge in the classroom, (boating safety course, and a piloting and seamanship course) Then take your Captain out and learn to back into a slip with a 25 mph crosswind. Learn to pilot your boat in a running tide, go up and down the ICW, dealing with a lot of traffic, waiting for bridges to go up, etc. Then get out a few times when the Gulf Stream is running 8-12 feet, and learn to safely navigate in and out of inlets. Just getting these basics down pat will keep your boatyards repairs down to a minimum, and your lives intact.

    I will be more than happy to address any specific questions you have, just like most members will be. And I wish you the very best in your new adventure!
  15. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    No, sorry. Same deal. You need the knowledge, sea time, physical, etc, and take the same test. (experience determines the license you qualify for.). They just prep you for the test. The place for basic knowledge is the U.S. Power Squadron or CG Auxiliary courses or the School of Hard Knocks. A license must be earned with Sea Time plus. Lives that assume you have experience are in the hands of a captain. Being book smart doesn't cut it.
  16. NEO56

    NEO56 Member

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    You are absolutely right...but it's the same thing all around, Pilot's License... a few hours of ground school before you even step into the cockpit. Scuba, class room time prior to jumping in the pool.etc. It's nice to know that you have a "basic" understanding prior to taking the helm. As a teenager, I was in the Coast Guard Aux. Mostly patrol, (pulling people off of sandbars, writing tickets for overloading a boat, etc.) and SAR's when we were needed. I guess growing up in the waters of Miami, you get to see all kinds of things a knowledgeable boater wouldn't try in a million years. But I agree with you that real world time at the helm is one of the best teachers. There used to be a great column in Flying magazine titled "I learned about flying from that." About Pilots who had "brain farts" and how it almost got them killed. I'd really like to see a column like that in PMY or some other similar magazine. I think it would be very helpful to not only newbies, but to all boaters, some of whom would smile and remember the time they did that.

    I know the debate has raged on for years, about licensing all boaters. I for one am all for it. These guys in south Florida who can go plunk down 200 grand plus for a Offshore speed boat, load it up with bikini clad girls, and without one single bit of high speed boat handling (or any other kind of knowledge) go flying down the ICW at 70+mph is insane. It's kind of like putting a 9mm in a 4 year old's hand. O.K. I'm climbing off my soapbox now.
  17. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    AH, but they keep me employed after their first major screw up.:D:cool:
  18. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Well, our recommendation would be a combination of hands on instruction through an experienced captain and of a maritime school with captain's training. If you don't have experience you need a captain for a 68' Cheoy Lee. Now, if you want to learn, you get one who will teach you. And I don't mean teach by you watching, but teach by requiring you to do under their supervision.
  19. Old Phart

    Old Phart Senior Member

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    Interesting input.

    Anyone know if OP still has the boat?
  20. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    or ever had it:D