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stiff seacocks (no pun intended)

Discussion in 'Technical Discussion' started by Beau, Apr 14, 2019.

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  1. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    If they’re frozen and a reasonable amount of force doesn’t free them, don’t make it worst. Wait till your next haul out and free them. Don’t take a chance.
  2. wdrzal

    wdrzal Senior Member

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    I use a silicone based greased , Specifically a silicon grease for brake calipers. I use NAPA Sil-Glyde , great in hot engine rooms also . Non-melting, Non-freezing, Non--gumming, Water proof and doesn't harm rubber seals and O-Rings. Great for rudder and stabilizer shafts and all linkages in your engine room. It has one of the highest thermal temperature differences of any grease, --20 F to +600F. Got a tube in my hand but misplaced my camera batteries so look ay this link for now.


    https://www.ebay.com/p/2-NAPA-76513...d-Tube-4oz/1086131766?iid=173555455432&chn=ps
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2019
  3. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    If a 18" pipe, basically a foot past their normal handle does not free them, and I can't get them free'd and turning with a relatively normal amount of effort. I don't free them at the next haul out, I replace them. I just had 2, 2.5-3" seacocks replaced on 2 different yachts. One a 2006 and the other a 2013, that the handle turned with a normal amount of restriction, but it didn't shut the waterflow off at all.
  4. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    That option is on the table as well. If I could get an 18" pipe on the handle, I think they would move more easily. Unfortunately the way they are situated to the surrounding equipment I have a difficult time getting any kind of lever on them.
  5. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Do you have any tower fabricators near you? They usually have a bin of cut off tower pieces that are bent in different directions in the scrap pile to get recycled. Usually you can find one the right diameter (to go over the handle) and bent enough to fit in there.
  6. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    Good idea, thx
  7. Dan balmer

    Dan balmer Member

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    Hi Beau. Just now noticed your post on the seacocks of your post 50 I’ve got the same boat and Ive installed the grease fittings and greased and spent quite the energy manouvering around the engines I order to exercise the valves with pipe wrench on handle lever at 90 degrees to lever due to battery box etc blocking access to lever. Anyway after this Herculean effort as a thin wiry guy I never did get them to operate by hand easily. Just have to live with it and develop technique with pipe wrench The valves and their handles are quite substantial to allow this tool work. You just need to learn how to work in that terribly cluttered space. My boat is a 2000 post 50 and that’s what I’ve done. The valves did loosen up but still need pipe wrench method due to no room!
  8. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    Thanks for that info. I may just bear the expense of replacing them. They have really become tight. I luv my 50'. 820 Man's push it efficiently. I think it one of the best production boats around.
  9. wingless

    wingless Member

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    The seacock valves on my boat would never have the desired feel when opening or closing, regardless of lubrication or frequency of movement.

    All my seacock valves were reworked by me to remove the stem and nylon seal washers behind the handle and gland nut.

    All of those parts were cleaned, lubricated and reassembled.

    The gland nut was tightened to attain no leakage and proper handle movement.

    Now all my seacock valves have an excellent feel when opening or closing.

    Admin Edit: Hot-Linked image Removed.
    Last edited by a moderator: May 31, 2019
  10. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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  11. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    My 38 year old son got in there and worked them with a little effort. His assessment is that the valves are fine, but I've become a "weakling"....
  12. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Get a 18" piece of PVC or aluminum pipe that fits over the handle.
  13. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    That trick is not easily done here. The space around the handle doesn't have a whole lot of extra area to move around in, nor is it clear of obstructions. But thanks

    My son moved it with a little effort. He suggests that its getting tighter to me each year, because I'm getting older each year - 38 YO brat!
  14. wingless

    wingless Member

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    There are lots of remote manual and automatic actuators available.

    Here is one example.
  15. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    Wingless,

    I just removed your image from post #29. We do NOT allow hot-linked images from hosting companies because the host can change the image to something less benign that a 'seacock'. Sorry for the inconvenience.
  16. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Re-visit my post #13 above for a handle tool. Even at a right angle to the cock handle, some of these tools really help.
  17. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    Thanks. We have tried a lot of configurations so far, box wrench, pipe, stetson...we will find the right one. The challenge is that I have a lot of "stuff" hanging over the space above the handles - battery box, outboard catwalk, hoses etc, and the handles have about a 6" clearance as the 'throw' swings pass the back of the engine.
    Last edited: May 31, 2019
  18. wingless

    wingless Member

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    Sorry for my failure to conform with that rule.

    Thanks for correcting my error.

    Here is my seacock image that is hopefully properly uploaded now to the forum. This time I pressed the Upload a File pushbutton below the text on the reply.

    Metal Primer Macerator Seacock.JPG
  19. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    Why do we need your photos? I had a specific question which your post does nothing to answer.
  20. wingless

    wingless Member

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    The OP finds the seacock difficult to move. My reply w/ image is a direct response to the OP question.

    My seacock valves also had less-than-desired action.

    My post describes the method I followed to attain excellent action on the seacock valves.

    The rework I created is totally different than the recommendations from others, like using a Zerk fitting on the drain to inject grease. When I spoke w/ the seacock manufacturer they specifically instructed AGAINST that action, that it could cause permanent damage to the seal.

    The missing / now restored image shows the type of seacock valve that I reworked, because there are different styles. The OP does not know the seacock model.

    Best wishes and good luck resolving your issue.