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Steel Hull Replacement

Discussion in 'Chris Craft Roamer Yacht' started by Nick Mace, Oct 16, 2015.

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Dive In or Turn and Run

  1. Run... Run fast.

    85.7%
  2. Shouldnt be that bad. Go for it

    14.3%
  3. Wait for a better one to come along

    0 vote(s)
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  1. Nick Mace

    Nick Mace New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2015
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Boston
    Hi all. I'm sorry if this has been covered. I tried to search but couldn't find anything, and I'm against the clock here. I'm trying to save a 1965 steel hull Roamer (57') from the crusher. Here's where the "you're crazy" comments come in... She has visited the bottom at her slip twice now, and was submerged to the cabin ceiling this last time (July). Aside from the obvious issues of motor/electrical refit, and interior, ect..., my main concern is that the steel hull will need complete replacement at this point. I realize I would need an ultrasound/bang the hull party and all, I'm not asking how identify the condition, my big question is cost of replacement. Has anyone needed to replace an entire, or most of a steel hull? Thanks in advance!
  2. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    10,558
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    First, did she sink due to a hull leak or another cause?
    Unless she's been submerged for years I can't see replating the whole hull as necessary unless that was the cause, but there's a good chance some replating may be necessary on a steel boat of that age. However I must ask a question. If everything from the cabin ceiling down needs to be replaced or seriously rebuilt, including the motors and electrical system, all you really have is a hull. If you don't think you have that, then what are you left with? Answer: a pile of scrap that threatens to empty your bank account. Hopefully this is a boat you're thinking about buying, not one you own. Mind you that anything can be fixed or rebuilt if you're willing to throw enough money at it.
  3. Nick Mace

    Nick Mace New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2015
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Boston
    As the story goes, she sunk the first time due to puncture from pylons (while at dock), which makes me nervous about the hull integrity out of the gate. The second time they say the bilge failed, which to me means holes' right? We don't get that much rain here in the Bean to sink a 57 foot yacht from top leaks (I dont think). When checking her out yesterday, the engins compartment (what I could get at) has already started to rust. Who knows if this is new rust or old. Im nervous about being able to rid her of all the interior rust, spending a ton to replate pinholes, then have failure after failure. I dont mean to be a pessimist, but my pockets aren't the deepest is all.

    I plan to live aboard her year round. I think a lot of the interior can be saved, as they cleaned it down and dried her out fairly well (https://goo.gl/photos/CLqSRrKqWL79A2An9). I will obviously need to refit all the electical, but will most likely leave the motors for later, and hope the serial hybrid refit tech becomes more viable. So.. I have a deposit down and tentative agreement to purchase based on further research over a week). I really love the boat. I just have no idea cost-wise of the steel work. Are there any ways to chemically or otherwise tend to the bilge/interior rust?
  4. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    10,558
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Bean Town adds another element, salt water. Not a friend to steel. Add in electrolosis and steel has a potential big problem. Puncture from the pilings against steel??? Yeah that would worry me. "Bilge failed"? I'm guessing that means the bilge pump failed. Where did the water come from that the bilge pumps were needed? Maybe he really means hull failed, as seems to be your (valid) concern here. Welders in your area get about $75-$100 an hour (if you can get them) plus the cost of steel, plus a helper, plus the cost of haulout, launch and dry storage while the work is being done. I'll guess you'll be in hole a little over $2,000 for the first plate replaced, and $1,000 each thereafter. That's not counting any other rot and rust inside like stringers, fuel, water and waste tanks, etc. The rewiring could be huge, and remember we're talking electric on a steel boat. You don't want that done wrong. Motors $60,000 to $80,000 each. Keep in mind also that a boat without working motors is a barge. Not many marinas want them in their slips. You can dry out an interior, and even make it look good, but what about mold? Then you'll face whether living aboard is even permitted. What will you do with your waste in winter with no pumpouts working? BTW, have you ever slept on a steel boat in winter? Brrrrrrrrrr.

    Seriously though, a boat like this is for a person who has very deep open pockets and a lot of love for old Roamers. Others end up being the last owner, something I always recommend against. I wouldn't pay more than I could get from a scrapper if I start my project and need to give it up. For that though I have to think the marina would rather deal with a professional scrapper, and have the boat be gone.
  5. Nick Mace

    Nick Mace New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2015
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Boston
    Thanks Cap. Sound advice. I think I'll let her go. A shame. Thanks bud!!!!