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Steel Hull protection system

Discussion in 'Chris Craft Roamer Yacht' started by iaranicki, Oct 9, 2005.

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  1. iaranicki

    iaranicki Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2005
    Messages:
    47
    Location:
    saint jean cap ferrat, France
    Hello everyone,
    I would like to sand blast my 32 steel hull. I read the different threads about this especific topics.
    Everyone seems to be quoting the Interlux system. very few references abou the AWL Grip system.
    I had an advise from a ship yard that the best system is AWLgrip. He says he is using this on steel hulls for the last 20years so what awl grip recommends is the following process:
    - Sand blasting the hull to white metal
    - Mil-Spec anti-corrosive Epoxy primer S 9001
    - Gray Epoxy primer D1001
    - White Epoxy primer D8001
    - Towelable Fairing compound
    - Epoxy spayable fairing compound D6001
    - Sanding
    - White epoxy primer D8001
    - Gray Epoxy Primer D1001
    - AWLGRIP Top Coat

    From what I ghave seen the job he is doing is absolutely fantastic he restaoring classic Dutch steel baots.

    Does anyone have some experience and comparison point between INTERLUX and AWLGRIP?
    Second question is what would be a reasonable price to pay for such work?
    He is asking for 6-7000$ for the 32', it find this expensive any comparison point?
    thank you in advance for any input

    Ivan
  2. WindsorRoamer

    WindsorRoamer New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Windsor On
    Ivan,
    I went through doing this whole job last spring on my 1966 37 Steel Roamer. I researched extensively what product to use and I settled on the Interlux system. There are other products out there such as Petit’s Rustloc that some guys will recommend, but as you mentioned all of the experts recommend either AWLGRIP or the Interlux system. I settled on the Interlux system because a.) My local boat store carries Interlux (international paints) not Awlgrip products, so it saved me shipping costs et cetera from buying elsewhere b.) Before hand I called the Interlux helpline/tech line and found them so useful that it made it hard to contemplate using another product (in fact I programmed their number into my speed dial on my phone!)
    As far as your second question with regards to price, it has a lot to do with the current condition of your hull. I would talk to the guy a little more and find out what he foresees will need to be done i.e. extensive plating, fairing. This has a lot to do with the amount of labour and materials that go into the job. But, just as an estimate I ‘sub’ contracted out the work on my boat for the sandblasting and welding last spring. Paid $1100. (cash) for sandblasting – a day and a half of work for two guys. $1000 (cash) for plating, this was a high price but I wanted it done right (managed to find a guy who previously built boats for the Canadian Coast Guard). Total Interlux materials costs were approximately $2500.00. Friends, and I did the rest of the work which if I had to guess worked out to approximately 100 hours of work, so without labour it cost me $3600.00 (Canadian), which depending on the day is about $3500USD or $10 USD ;-). So in short, I would say this guy sounds a bit expensive provided your hull is decent shape, BUT this is not a job you want to have done twice…it really does pay to have it done right the first time.

    Regards,
    Jonathan.
  3. iaranicki

    iaranicki Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2005
    Messages:
    47
    Location:
    saint jean cap ferrat, France
    Hi Jonathan,
    Thank you very much that was exactly the info that I was looking for.
    I believe Awlgrip seams one of the top sytems to use to protect our steel.
    on that I have not more doubts. remain the question of the price which should be proportional to the work.

    As you have just done the same I am going to abuse as I have a set of additional questions:

    Hull prior to works
    - What did your hull look like before sandblasting?
    - Was the need for replating obvious or did you discorver it after sand blasting the hull?
    - How was the botom of the V inside the hull was the tar pealing off until how high from the begining of the V.
    - My interior look very clean pic 1866 except at the bottom of the V.

    Hull sections
    - Which parts of the hull needed replating?
    - The part I have doubt on are the side panels at the 2 rear corners(see pics 1916&1921)
    - the bottom of the V looks very solid from the outside (see Pic 1927).

    Hull inside protection
    - What did you do inside in the Bottom fo the V? did you apply the bitumen? did you just paint with a protecting system?

    I still need to discuss the price, I just to better understand teh work that needs to be done.

    thank you again for your feedback
    Ivan

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
  4. iaranicki

    iaranicki Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2005
    Messages:
    47
    Location:
    saint jean cap ferrat, France
    forgot attachments it is not an easy process in this forum every atachment is quite a process...
    Ivan

    Attached Files:

  5. AvalonTom

    AvalonTom New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Baltimore Maryland
    ZINGA

    Has anyone tried zinga?
    http://www.zingacoating.com/
    If so should an epoxy based system go on top of this?
    Will Interlux paints bond well to this?
  6. WindsorRoamer

    WindsorRoamer New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Windsor On
    Ivan,
    Prior to the sandblasting the Hull looked decent, we decided to sandblast the boat b/c we just purchased it a year prior and were not sure what really was under all the bottom ‘paint’ - in short it was for peace of mind. We definitely did not expect the hull to be in as poor of shape as we thought it was, but it fairness this is our first steel boat and really had nothing to compare to. Our welder said it was in great shape for a boat of her age and that we did a very smart thing by stripping it down and plating as needed, and then some…therefore I would say some of the plating was very obvious i.e. holes that had gone right through the hull, and in other areas there was evidence of electrolysis (pin holes) which we plated as well, again for peace of mind. The rear corners on our boat were in good shape; after sandblasting it was obvious that someone had previously plated the port stern portion (not actually on the stern, but on the port side of the boat, below the waterline towards the stern).

    As far as the inside goes, it was generally in great shape, except along the V as the previous owner had let water sit in throughout the winter. We cleaned it out thoroughly and painted all the areas with Petits Rustloc, including all areas that were welded on the outside – this is a must as the welding will burn the paint off on the inside and leave raw/exposed steel – not good!

    Lastly, we had additional Zinc added to the stern; we had the welder weld two stainless bolts to the stern to mount the zinc, then just bolted it on. Total cost less than $100, and again in my mind some good preventive maintenance.
  7. Orestes

    Orestes New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    RI - Cove Heavan Mariina Barrington
    I have
    Presumably the best product overseas
    Comes on gray only, mil speck
    I will use it this summer
    Adam