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Sportfish tosses captain overboard...

Discussion in 'General Sportfish Discussion' started by YachtForums, Sep 3, 2010.

  1. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Yeah except an outgoing tide in Jupiter inlet, and the waves look not "That Big", but the inlet is shallow (not deep water) and they always have a deep hole......have to be careful......That's exactly how Octopussy sank in Jupiter inlet, went over a wave and the bottom of the wave dropped out from underneath her
  2. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    Capt. J is right about Jupiter. It IS shallow and NOT considered to be a big boat inlet, however sportfish boats of this size regularly run it. In viewing the sequence of pics, it wouldn't be far-fetched to conclude the bow was driven into the sea bottom by a cresting wave pushing the transom. Once the bow was planted, the stern simply pivoted around the fixed point, ending up broadside to the break. An unfortunate event, in which most, if not all of us, have experienced to a certain degree.

    Godspeed Capt. Henry. Our prayers are with your family.
  3. 84far

    84far Senior Member

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  4. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Yeah, that would be it.......In good weather it's not a bad inlet to run a 50'+ boat in and out of.....But with rough seas and an outgoing tide.......not good......
  5. CTdave

    CTdave Senior Member

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    I borrowed this from a post on another site (THT). It shows the inlet and the boat just moments after the accident (see time/date of the Jupiter Inlet Web Cam) & right about the time the mate took control. The boat can be seen on the right.
    If the breakers don't look big, look at them next to the 48' Garlington.

    Attached Files:

  6. Loren Schweizer

    Loren Schweizer YF Associate Writer

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    According to the tide tables, this would have been about an hour after dead (sorry) low tide; pretty skinny water for running the surf.
    Whether he, as Carl suggested, tried to poke a hole in the bottom with his bow, or merely overran a cresting wave, technically the operative term is 'broach'.
  7. cabobo09

    cabobo09 Member

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    Crossing bars or coming into inlets with steep or breaking seas is one of our most stressful times at sea. A broach generally will put you up on the jetty. In the PNW, the USCG will escort you in when times a marginal. The first thing they have you do is put on your life vest.

    Unfortunately, we learn things from others misfortunes. It would be beneficial for those of you who have experienced these conditions to share your experiences so others can learn how to deal with these tough situations. Of course, standing offshore and waiting for conditions to improve is preferred.
  8. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    I always told my wife that, when I die, it will be coming in an inlet. There is no more dangerous place. Coming in you're looking at the backs of the waves. It's not until it's too late that you can see the curl that may drop you on a bar or pitch-pole you. Reguardless of conditions my inflatable PFD is always on when I break an inlet.
    One of the most common inlet mistakes is cutting it short. Shoals build on both sides. It may take an extra 5 minutes to line up with the A buoy. Time well spent.
    I once met a captain who said that when it gets rough he looks for an A and shoots for the inlet. Dumb. Unless you're familiar stick with the main inlets. There are a lot of inlets on the east coast that aren't good for more than a 20 footer.
    Always seek local knowledge. Follow a local in, but keep back a safe distance just in case he's not so knowledgable.
  9. lobo

    lobo Senior Member

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    NZ Coastguard has posted on Youtube a complete set of clips about "crossing the bar" - very impressive footage with lots of interviews. Check "NZFishFed". Afterwards you'll never take a risk again, on any bar crossing.
  10. capterik

    capterik New Member

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    If the Octopussy that you speak of was Stallupis, I think that you have confused it with the Dennison, For Your Eyes Only, which sank in Hillsboro Inlet, as far as I know, the Octopussy has never sunk.

    I have Captained a vessel out of this inlet for 16yrs, its 100ft and draws 6-6.5 ft, I can not do low tide unless it is absolutely flat calm. Shame that one mistake cost him his life, condolences to the Family.
  11. 84far

    84far Senior Member

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    I think if one was to cross the bar either in or out, should stop somewhere safe, check it out first, and when making the run don't hesitate.

    I think when running back in, stay just behind the wave, there's plenty of water there. And run with it till it takes you back inside the heads, or it runs it's self flat. Stay on the plane, easy to adjust the throttle.

    I got taken out by a rogue wave just outside the Mooloolaba Inlet when sail training. The wind pissed off and I was a sitting duck. So not a nice feeling when all you can see is white, with the rigging bashing your body... :eek:

    Far
  12. captainviv

    captainviv Member

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    correct me if i am wrong , but , i think if you "stay" on the plain , you would then overtake the wave . my 48ft "plains" +/- 15knts , i am sure this is faster than what the wave is moving ? maybe someone can tell us the speed of a wave just before/once broken....
  13. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I am almost positively sure it was octopussy that sank in jupiter inlet. It happened many years ago when the boat was new and on one of it's initial seatrials coming into jupiter inlet. It touched bottom and tore the jets out of the bottom of the boat. They ended up floating it by shooting a ton of ping pong balls into the engine room through the openings where the jets were tore off and other areas. Maybe someone else remembers it.
  14. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    I thought Discovery's Mythbusters had clearly busted the ping pong balls ship raising theory...
  15. 84far

    84far Senior Member

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    Depends on the size of the wave.... my last take was 14knots. The point is, if the boat's not planning, it takes that little bit longer to react to a situation. And if you have 2 waves forming 1 behind you, the wave is going to accelerate and might catch your transom...

    Cheers

    Far
  16. CTdave

    CTdave Senior Member

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    Out of my MANY trips up and down the east coast, I've developed my own strategy:
    First: I mark up a set of current charts with big red "X"s across the inlets that are what I consider a "local knowledge only" inlet. Next I have my "in a pinch" followed by "deep water safe inlets" (though these still can be tricky in the rough stuff).
    Next, if I'm headed into an inlet that is in the least bit questionable, I call Sea Tow or Towboat U.S. & ask them for local knowlege pertaining to the inlet. They are always a very good source. Once, I called the USCG regarding Oregon Inlet a week after a hurricane & was told not to attempt it.
    Finally, if it is rough or if it is not a deep water commercial inlet, I always take a few moments and watch the inlet, looking for where the breakers are or if I'm lucky, I'll watch a couple of locals go in & out.

    Stay behind the wave, one hand adjusting the throttles & the other on the wheel
  17. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    84FAR I'm a little confused. Are you talking about a sail or other slow boat? If so, the back of the wave will be near impossible to stay with. A slow boat is stuck with the trough and will have to let the wave behind propel them and take what comes. In a boat with speed I prefer to ride the top of the wave just behind the curl. Always deeper water, less chance of falling off behind the wave and having your stern pushed around, and a smooth ride in. Each boat handles differently though and has to attack situations differently. No hard and fast rules. Know and be aware of all that's around you, know your vessel, and be ready to change your plan any mili-second.
  18. 84far

    84far Senior Member

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    My suggestions are in relation to a fast moving boat, one that can plane... Sports fishers/cruisers and the alike. And like you and Dave, we are on the same page - stick just behind the wave and you should be fine.

    My personal experience was in a small sailing boat.... was a boat, now scrap ;) .

    Crossing the bar and going out in a slow moving cruiser (bay cruiser) that 'can't' plane, that's all pretty straight forward... Coming in though, well good luck. Cheers

    Far
  19. geriksen

    geriksen Senior Member

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    It looks like that is what he was trying to do but got a bit forward on the wave and did not back off in time to keep from going over the top. The "bow hitting bottom" theory does seem to explain that sudden (pitchpole/roll). I will bet that all happened very quickly and he never had a chance once he went over the front of that wave. Rudders came out of the water and all he could do was try to hang on.
    Unfortunate for sure but very instructive to see how it happened.
  20. capterik

    capterik New Member

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    The Octopussy, a 143ft Heesen built in 1988, has never been to the bottom, and I never saw it go out Jupiter inlet. The Denison that sank at Hillsboro, was raised, extended and jets removed and runs on prop drives now. Although Octopussy was before my time in Jupiter, I was running out of Fort Lauderdale at the time, and this business would have had an accident like that plastered all over, for all to see. Dennisons on the other hand are known to sink. They say if you want to see a Dennison, you need a glass bottom boat.