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Sliding Windows - repair/Rebuild on Luhrs 34 Tournament

Discussion in 'Luhrs Yacht' started by Butch Porcaro, Sep 3, 2020.

  1. Butch Porcaro

    Butch Porcaro New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Fairhaven, MA
    I have a recently purchased 1989 Luhrs Tournament in July and I am working on getting her up to near new condition. I look at this work as part of the boat ownership and getting it to look as good as possible is the reward for me.
    So I down to The sliding windows on this boat which are hard to open in what seems to be due to a lack of use or maintenance by the previous owners. I have cleaned the tracks, lubricated etc. to no avail. I am also at a loss on how to dismantle or remove the window for a closer inspection.
    Can anyone point me in the right direction. It shouldn't be as hard as it seems.
    Thanks
  2. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    11,218
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    If the windows aren't leaking I hope you're not opening a Pandora's box in a 30 year old boat that's probably done a fair amount of flexing over the years. But with that warning it's not a hard job. Simply remove the screws (which may be inside or out and covered by a strip of plastic or rubber). Then with a razor knife cut the caulking on the outside and pry it out. There's several YouTube videos on it. Here's one: https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...9a31194d364efdb1c76e34a6ae0cbc0d&action=click
    You can also check videos of it done on RV's as the installation is virtually the same.

    Btw, welcome to YF. For those who don't know you're from the home of Herman Melville and Moby Dick and one of the finest whaling museums on the east coast (right across the bridge).
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2020
  3. Butch Porcaro

    Butch Porcaro New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Fairhaven, MA
    My fear exactly. The windows(Glass) and frames are not leaking and although I assumed removing the entire frame was an option, I was looking to see if a method exist to just remove the glass from its tracks without removing the window frames. If not, this would be a spring project in concert with Marina services. But I would hate to remove the frames only to find out the glass lifted out another way.
    Thanks for the help.

    BTW, I grew up in Massachusetts and had other boats docked in that area. New Bedford and Fairhaven is a great place to be. It has been a fishing community started and still maintained by immigrant families and still maintains strong community bonds even today. But for a boater, you have quick access to some of the best fishing grounds on the east coast, some great sailing in Buzzard's Bay and small quaint harbors or anchor spots that never get boring.
  4. Dan balmer

    Dan balmer Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Messages:
    62
    Location:
    Port Canaveral,fla
    I have a similar aged sportfish and the windows stoped sliding to open over the years due to the sagging of the structure above the window frame causing a bow in the aluminum frame so that it rests somewhat on the glass preventing it from moving except with much force This is just my interpretation but if true would require some seroious work not just lubricant or cleaning of tracks.
  5. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2004
    Messages:
    9,824
    Location:
    Satsuma, FL
    Some of the problems our dockside service company had experienced is the window frame getting crushed down.
    In a fly-bridge boat especially.
    One of our crude dock side work a-rounds has been to use a bottle jack and push up the middle of the window box.
    Just takes a fraction of an inch to prove the issue.
    Then pending what to work with, install a vertical support.
    Any thing past this gets expensive and we refer the customer to Huckins Yacht for more complicated service.

    On my personal boat (old Bertram), it was just a length of 1" rail tube and for trim, two, 90 degree stanchions top and bottom.
    Raised the center top frame about 3/16" and installed our fix. Settled the jack and it was and has been perfect.

    Usually they cut out the window hole and re-inatall the same (if not destroyed on removal) or a new frame.
    We also have done some of the whole window replacement when we could ourselves.
    New Glass framed windows come from these kids; https://www.boatwindowframes.com/
    Never a issue after. Expensive, but one (maybe two) fingers can slide the glass and never a leak or a corrosion issue ever again.
  6. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    11,218
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Before you try that bottle jack keep in mind that along with bending the frame up (or maybe it'll end up being down) you're bending the fiberglass above (or below) it, and fiberglass doesn't bend well. Pandora's box.
  7. Neil_N

    Neil_N New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2021
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Delaware
    Butch, I hope all is well with your boat and her windows. The windows on my 1973 T360 were shot (corroded aluminum, cracked glass, leaking frames, etc.) and needed replacement. I found a company down in Florida to make replacements, tho' it cost a pretty penny! (Yeah, I know ... B.O.A.T!)