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roamer deck wood possibilities?

Discussion in 'Chris Craft Roamer Yacht' started by craig m, Jul 8, 2007.

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  1. craig m

    craig m New Member

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    i've been wondering about the possibilities of other hardwoods for my aft deck.is it O.K. to use mahogany or other wood if it is sealed well?I'm trying to find a more affordable alternative and still stay with real wood. any thoughts out there? thanks Craig.m
  2. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Tek-dek

    The rear decks of Roamers are well-known sore-spots. CC used marine plywood covered with Nautilex (still available) - which was fine for about 10+ years or so. Inevitably, however, water/moisture intrudes causing "weak spots" underfoot; and the covering gets a little shabby.
    What to do? :(
    Flumuxed & chagrined by this state of affairs on board "Tin Tonic" - I finally bit the bullet and decided to undertake a complete replacement project. As for materials, it quickly became a choice between real teak and artificial teak (Plasteak or Tek Dek).
    Much as I love wood, the cost of real teak was mind boggling (not to mention the cost of the many (very many) diamond tipped saw blades you'll need to cut through it): estimates were around 9Gs for the wood alone.:eek:
    Thus, the issue became of which fake teak to buy: comparing samples I went with Tek-Dek (both cost around half = $4.5K). See both heres:
    http://www.tek-dek-international.com/
    http://www.plasteak.com/boating/boating.html
    In any case, know this - this is a major project -- and once you start, you have to finish, eh? Itz only the back deck.
    Thus, it would be wise to get some help lined up - that way, I actually finished my winter project before (yes, thatz right - before) spring.
    Wundabar!
    The stuff wears like iron.
    Have subjected it to every fluid (gas, gin, grease, oil, red wine, etc.) and form of abuse (dropping heavy objects, hammers, high heels, etc) possible without failure.
    Bottomline: indestructible. :rolleyes:
    Also, the layer of TEK-DEK quieted down engine noise/vibration transmitted through the deck.
    Hope this all helps - keep us posted.
    Cheers!
    Eric
    PS - And yes, I promise (promise) to take some photoes and send in (some fine day).
    PSS - Coordinated this deck project with fuel tank replacement (2 birds with one wallet)!
    PSSS - Plus with artifical teak you dont ever have to do this:
    http://www.yandina.com/TeakDeck.htm
  3. Mov-it!

    Mov-it! New Member

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    Good advise Redman!

    Plasteak and other artificial deck materials are a very good alternative for a teak deck. It is a shame that the issue about real teak decks is not negotiable with custom yacht owners. They always go for the real thing because they believe it's how it should be. If you consider that a teak deck starts life at a thickness of 15 to 18 mm and is grinded down to less of half the thickness within ten years, it's clearly not the best option in terms of practicality and ease of maintenance.

    Artificial deck materials are more resistant to the influences of the elements. Can take more sunlight and don't get stained in case of accidents with greasy substances. The impact resistance is also a lot better.

    On the other hand, teak is becoming more rare by the day and new forrests take a long time to grow new teak trees. The environmental impact of artificial teak is also less.

    If you want to save yourself a lot of trouble, work and cash, go for artificial teak!

    A real wood alternative is the red cidar
  4. craig m

    craig m New Member

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    ithaca ny
    deckwood poss.

    dear eric and redman - thanks for the replies- i guess i'll look into the tekdek' i've always been a "real wood snob" when it comes to furniture etc. but then i don't leave my furniture out in the rain and elements. we do have some outdoors teak furniture and i must say i'm not very impressed how it seems to fare being exsposed to the weather.i've got to admit the tekdek etc. sounds great for durability and cutting down on maintenence- being new to this entire boat owner thing i've had to start getting creative in solving some repair problems- so far its been fun and i'm definitely falling in love with my "old girl". by the way Eric she's the "at last" out of parish ny. hull #RXB-38-0002R. I,m also lucky to have most of the original paperwork- electrical schematics etc. anyways thanks for the info and encouragement. craig.m
  5. wally erickson

    wally erickson New Member

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    One word; Ipa. http://www.ipe-wood.com/faq.html#other

    If you have a table saw you can rip down the 3/4 x 5 1/2 inch boards into strips.
    It's heaver than teak and won't hold a stain or varnish very well because it's so hard. I have gone on about this wood before so I'll keep it short.
    It's very cheap, about $1.80 a lin. ft. for a 1x6 .I have worked with it on and off for years now. If you have any questions you can email me.

    Teak doesn't need diamond blades! It's not any worse then any other hardwood. Diamond blades are for concrete.
  6. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    All in the details

    Couldn't find many good photos there but found some more here:
    http://www.ipedepot.com/deckpicks.htm
    Interestingly, Ipe is a type of Brazilian Walnut. The price comparison with teak is great: $7 vs $15 per unit.:p and kept sealed will retain its original reddish-brown color - not always easy to do: http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/porch/msg1015172230306.html
    http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Finishing_Ipe_Outdoors.html.
    Otherwise, it will turn silver (see last photo).
    More detailed comparisons here (Ipe/Tabebuia Spp. “Brazilian Walnut” VS.Cumaru/Dipterix Odorata "Brazilian Teak" VS.Teak/Tectona Grandis "True Teak"):
    http://stangelohardwoods.com/decking.htm
    http://deckandpatio.bobvila.com/Article/113.html
    Cheers!
    Eric
    PS - Be careful when cutting ironwood - the sawdust mite be toxic:
    http://www.woodworking.com/article_archive.cfm?section=6&article=545
    Really?:
    http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Tooling_for_Teak.html
    http://fp1.centurytel.net/amww/wood.html
    http://tropix.cirad.fr/asia/teck.pdf
    http://woodstreet.com/scripts/moulding/wsplist.pl?page=Cumaru_decking.htm
    http://216.239.51.104/search?q=cach...blade+teak+silica&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=10&gl=us#9
    And as for IPE:
    "Ipe is a South American wood that is also called ironwood, and by the trade name Pau Lope. Ipe is very durable and resists cupping, splintering and twisting. It is very strong and heavy, is low-maintenance, and will not shrink. It is extremely difficult to cut, however, so you can expect labor costs for installation to be very high. Ipe only requires sealant on the ends, but homeowners may choose to seal the wood and maintain its natural color or allow it to weather to a silver-gray while remaining smooth and splinter-free. Ipe is extremely dense and should last over 25 years." http://deckandpatio.bobvila.com/Article/113.html

    Attached Files:

  7. 9lives

    9lives Member

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    Location:
    Lake Superior
    aft deck real wood

    While I like Ericks option and if my boat was subject to the elements all day it would be the option I would go for irregardless of the choices available from exoctics. The bottom line is unless you completely seal the deck and have no way for the elements to infiltrate the plywood and stringers below the new decking you will rot out the substrate which renders the wonderfull properties of Ipe, Jatoba, etc. as meaningless! So just as much care if not more needs to be incorporated to the stringers and subfloor elements.
    That is why we used Smiths CPES (epoxy sealer) as a means to try and slow down the effects of rotting and water swell for the "sub floor". The best thing I did was the drop Curtain, cost a little over a boat unit but the deck is never wet except when underway. So even my real wood inexpensive Teak Parquet flooring is able to perform in this invironment. I would never leave it outside in the rain! ( I did this the first 2 months or so) BAD IDEA!!
    Even with the best urethane adhesive I lost a panel or 2 and had to reglue new ones in place the next winter. After the curtain, no more issues. Mark

    Mark

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  8. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Tek-dek Redux

    Finally.
    For anyone who cares - photoEz of what Tek Dek actually looks like outback!:p

    Attached Files:

  9. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Tek Dekky

    Three more for the road. :rolleyes:

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  10. 9lives

    9lives Member

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    Tin Tonic really does have Tek Dek after all!!

    :D

    Finally some pictures of the finished product!! Looks really nice, more authentic than I would have believed. Looks like the installer knew what he was doing contrary to what the owner said earlier!!

    Thanks for sharing the photos Eric,

    Mark
  11. Capn.Morty

    Capn.Morty New Member

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    Location:
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    Tek-Dek vs. Plasteak

    Was there a reason you chose one over the other? Cost? Warenty?
    I'm getting ready to begin repairing the deck on my 43' Roamer this winter and have already decided to go with a synthetic teak as opposed to real wood, but would like to hear your thoughts on why you chose tek-dek over the plasteak product.
    Thanks,
  12. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Apples vs. Oranges

    First of all, I dont believe in fairies, the sales brochure, or warranties - implied or otherwise.
    Both TEK-DEK and Plasteak are extremely durable, good-looking products. If installed correctly, they will last - pure & simple.
    Now, about why I picked TEK-DEK: well, itz really a matter of personal preference. Recommend you do what I did: have them send you some samples - they love doing that.
    Think you'll find the TEK-DEK more "real".
    That and the method of construction/application: tongue in groove; plus the nature of the dovetailed channels underneath which, when filled with adhesive, really "hold" the deck down.
    Amazing stuff really.
    No problems yet (1.5yrs+) - we'll see. :p
    Cheers!
    Eric
    PS - They even have TEK-DEK "LITE" now (see last photo):
    http://www.tek-dek-international.com/Tek-Dek Overview.htm
    PSS - This is not a project for wimps: if I hadnt had help, mite not still be done.

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  13. Capn.Morty

    Capn.Morty New Member

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    Thanks Redman. Got samples on the way (you were right - they were more then happy to send me something to look at).
    One more question - Did you send the Tek-Dek folks a schematic of your deck and let them design a package for you, or did you just do the calcualtions yourself (which seems easy enough to someone like me who has never done it) and order what you needed for the job? Thanks again.
  14. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Best part...

    Yes indeedee - sent them a factory blueprint of the floorplan -- and they provided a CAD/CAM schematic of an idealized laydown (including Kingplank) which proved invaluable. Will post this here once I get back to work.
    They really worked to make it happen.:p
    Cheers!
    Eric
    PS - Ten points to anyone who noticed how we "shortened" the engine hatches.
    PSS - And ten more for the reason why.

    Attached Files:

  15. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Combat PhotoEz

    For the war wary - how we actually "made sausage" -- redoing the back deck with TEK-DEK.
    Cheers!
    Eric
    PS - No live teak trees were hurt during the filming of this enterprise. :rolleyes:

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  16. Capn.Morty

    Capn.Morty New Member

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    Looks Like work....

    You're starting to intimidate me Redman... I assumed this would be like installing floating wood floors in a house (except with curves and strange angles). This looks like more then a 6-beer job to me!:eek:
  17. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Cheaper by the dozen,....

    ..., beers that is.
    Only thing more expensive than Tek-Dek/labor costs was the damage being wrought below and the constant need to replace rotting deck/timbers.
    Now, I like to think, all that is in the past.:eek:
    Seems likely - especially as redo afforded opportunity to redouble many cross-members and support beams.
    Will post those phoToeZ tommorrow when I get to work.
    Cheers!
    Eric
  18. CVS

    CVS New Member

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    OK I will bite this hook that no one else did...!:D Why did and how did you shorten the engine hatches? Am new owner of 37 Alum Riviera and planning new deck so here I am asking five years after this was posted!
    Cary
  19. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Lost-in-Space

    Like I said before, I had help. Alot of help.
    And cannot for the life of me remember why. :eek:
    My able assistant (read PROJECT MANAGER) was in charge and did it when I wasnt looking - but you still get 10 pts for noticing.
    In any case, let us know which direction you take.
    ENQUIRYING minds want to know.
    Cheers!
    -Eric
    PS - Hull# please; the AL 37 sounds exciting - tell us more.

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    Last edited: Mar 2, 2012
  20. CVS

    CVS New Member

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    New 37 Riviera aluminum

    I have not even seen my boat in person yet. Previous owner’s picture attached. With no choice under the selling charity’s schedule, I had to offer sight unseen, with no survey. ["Strike while the bug is close"] The 427s have not been started for about a year; will have to pump out old gas; need to transport, will need to add marine air. But bones appear decent and pretty good.

    As to the motors, currently 700 hours on one, about 800 on the other. Less than one 24 hr day use per year for over 40 years. Mallory electronic ignition on both motors. 4 cyl generator, reported as working. Refrigerator, working. December 20, 1966 (Shipping date). RXP-37-2508. Michigan boat until 8 years ago, salt and brackish water in VA since. In the water now. Previous owner has brochures, Mariner's Museum information, spare set of props, Seller kept a functioning dehumidifier and basic heat in boat during period of nonuse. Astounding. Barely broken in.. Hah!

    Am bringing to TN, then back home to TX when retirement gets here.

    Have learned so much on this forum since joining in 2009. About to learn a lot more I reckon.

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