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Raymarine AIS650

Discussion in 'Electronics' started by Scott M, Mar 10, 2016.

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  1. Scott M

    Scott M Member

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    Mar 9, 2016
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    Location:
    Annapolis, MD
    Getting ready to install AIS650 with my Classic E120 MFD's. Any issues, suggestions, comments from anyone with experience?
  2. Sea Gull

    Sea Gull Member

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    CT
    Best to give it a dedicated antenna. Other than that, it's easy to program and should run trouble free.
  3. HTMO9

    HTMO9 Senior Member

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    The Raymarine AIS 650 works best in a stand alone SeaTalk setup

    AIS650 Stand alone Sea Talk.jpg
    Using the older NMEA 0183 bus will slow down the system and not all information may come through.

    When using the AIS 650 in combination with the AIS 100 Antenna splitter and a VHF radio,

    AIS650 Expanded with splitter.jpg
    the system shares the VHF antenna. As VHF transmissions (in and out) get priority over AIS Data transmissions (for safety reasons), you may end up not receiving and transmitting AIS data for minutes.
    VHF voice and AIS data share the same frequency band by division via timing. So, if ever possible, use SeaTalk and a seperate antenna for the AIS. Otherwise, for pleasure boating on unclassed ships, the AIS 650 is the perfect system, as long as you keep salt and corrosion out of the connectors. And remember, the AIS 650 needs its own GPS antenna even with SeaTalk.
  4. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    I manage a boat with dual E120 and AIS650 . The NMEA 183 works very well. The E120 uses a special faster baud rate for the AIS data.
  5. bobhorn

    bobhorn Member

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    We have a Sitex AIS working with a Raymarine C120. The connection is NEMA183 but at 38400 BAUD.
  6. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    NEMA183 usually runs at 4800baud, the special 38400 really works well from the AIS boxes.
  7. Scott M

    Scott M Member

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    Follow up. AIS is working great. Had a minor issue with NMEA conflict. Used a shared bus bar with other inputs which caused the AIS to alarm constantly. Figured it out and all is well. Only surprise is that I have turned the Dangerous Target alarm OFF...goes off constantly in crowded harbors or at the dock. I basically leave it off.
  8. HTMO9

    HTMO9 Senior Member

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    That is the reason, I said, the AIS 650 works best with the SeaTalk Network. NMEA 0183 works great and with pretty high baud rate but the protocol has to be translated twice on each way. That slows down the system and information get lost. All systems purely based on NMEA 0183 work great and flawless. We had the same problem on our commercial ships with new systems comming in, which had to interface with older and slower systems. Different NMEA standards, proprietary protocols from specific systems with interface boxes and ARINC 429 signals from gyros compasses. The butt of an engineer sticking out of an electronic cabinet was a common sight :) on the bridge. What a nightmare. Now we are working with one supplier for one ship, one intergrated system (mostly Raytheon Synapsis Integrated Bridge). On yachts it is either Raymarine only (for smaller boats and tenders) or Simrad (both yacht line and professional line) for larger boats up to 90 ft.

    As you see, they are all American products, even if some of their think tanks and marketing staff are located in Europe. The best systems in the world for navigation both on the water and in the air, which are based on military technology, come from the US.

    "The war is the father of all things" (greece philosopher Heraklit (6./5. bC)