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Proteksan & Turquoise Superyacht "Yogi" Sinks!

Discussion in 'Turquoise Yacht' started by discokachina, Feb 17, 2012.

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  1. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    I have lightened up the pictures posted here and it looks like it can be two dents forward of the stabilizer..? Submarine..?

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  2. revdcs

    revdcs Senior Member

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    Or a container might have sunk after the impact?

    There are so many of the things floating around the oceans that the likelihood of hitting a submarine are probably less than that of hitting a container.
  3. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    I received an e mail last night from someone with direct knowledge of the sinking.

    There was no mention of hitting anything in it, it did say a loss of power from overheating and failed exhaust bellows resulted in the loss and a Door on maindeck aft was stove in by waves while they were rolling around deadship.

    As the guy who sent me this wasn't onboard I will have to treat the info with caution but it is a further expansion of the overheat/ bellows failure mentioned previously.

    I am still at a loss to understand how an overheating engine could get so far down the track with no one noticing that the chain of events was irreversible and resulted in a total loss.

    Even if running UMS there should have been a number of ways for the engine or exhaust to announce itself to the AMS long before failure.
  4. C4ENG

    C4ENG Senior Member

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    I have seen this on other vessels with the rubber exhaust bellows installed. The raw water gets cut off some how and before the engine gets to alarm point, the rubber exhaust bellows melts or catches fire.
    Last time I have seen this happen (about 6 months ago) is when the raw water intake pipes where infested with muscles the size of your pinky nail.
  5. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    If the raw water intake pipes were blocked so badly surely there was a reduction in flow of water to anything that was served by that SW Rail that should have announced itself via the AMS
  6. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    While some smaller boats do not have exhaust alarms I can t believe larger yachts don't!

    Usually when you experience partial or conplete raw water flow, the first indication will be the transmission temp creeping up before the engine coolant. It may not alarm right away by a decent helmsman should notice
  7. Jorge Lang

    Jorge Lang Senior Member

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    Compensators can fail if there is a loss of water going to the mixer. Two interesting points if this happens. First if the mixer is not getting water there is a good chance the engine isn't either, therefore alarms should be going off everywhere with an overheating engine. Secondly, a compensator is typically installed above waterline. If it were to fail, I can't picture that much water coming to sink a vessel of this size.
  8. AlfredZ

    AlfredZ Senior Member

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    Hi all,

    The 8 crew are part of the regular crew on board, all of whom are french. They were managing a trip from a scheduled drydock service in Turkey towards berth in Greece. According to AIS info, they were running in stealth mode during the time of the incident, the first call was made at 00:30hours (Hellanic coast guard time) and because of the bad weather the rescue attempts were started at 07:30, and the manufacturer was informed during the 7 hours waiting time of the incident, as you might have read from the words of their spokesperson, the bellows broke off but there is a shut-off valve right underneath. Another thing mentioned in the primary reports is that the captain was warned of bad weather (which I don't think would cause such a disaster on its own). Under the waterline of the ship there are two aft holding tanks for the swiming pool located aft on the weather deck. A crazy chain of events is the only comprehendable cause at the moment for not one cause on its own (all but God's will) could take this boat down.
    All the crew are well trained (as publicized) and have operated the ship during the last summer charter season in the med.

    Attached is the last route and position of Yogi before going stealth, it shows an anchorage a day before the incident which a guess was the resting point for the crew that many are viewing as not adequate and I personally see as enough for the job if well planned like any sea trip should be.

    Glad the crew is all safe.

    May all those at sea have fairwinds and seas to their favor.

    Cheers.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  9. nilo

    nilo Senior Member

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    number of crew

    for those of us who has doubts that the number of crew was not sufficient to run a 60 meter boat during a delivery cruise; a good example from the commercial world where a 4500 teu ship of 250 meters loa has only 9...

    Safmarine receives first of Wafmax trio
  10. joyful

    joyful New Member

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    Thank you for the update. As I work in the industry (marketing - non technical) I am getting loads of questions from friends asking how can such a thing happen to a new yacht built to the latest class rules.

    All I can say is wait until the the report comes out as I have no idea.

    From your posts and some of the comments in the media, the exhaust seems to be the problem. It would be helpful if somebody with knowledge of new yachts and the regulations could explain a sequence of events how this might cause a yacht to sink.

    Surely there are:

    1) Warning alarms (AMS?) that show tempertaure increase, loss of water flow or water in the engineroom, and back up ways of shutting off inlets automatically or manually.

    2) Water tight bulkheads isolating areas such as engineroom so that a boat could not sink, even if the automatic? bilge pumps could not keep up.

    3) Auxillary emergency generators outside the engineroom to power bilge pumps

    3) I read something about a main door on aft deck opening and letting in water as the boat rolled in the waves, presumbably backing up, again surely the class rules are designed for these loads

    Any help in my ignorance greatly appreciated as I do find the sinking alarming for the industry and quite inexplicable for new built boat with all the rules and regulations that the industry has to operate under. Will they need rewriting yet again.
  11. C4ENG

    C4ENG Senior Member

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    This is what I usually see (not always) on modern 150+ yacht with 3500 series CATS.
    Follow the raw water discharge off the sea water cooling pump and the pipe splits. One branch goes to supply the gear box heat exchanger and maybe a fuel or oil heat exchanger as well. Follow the other branch and it leads to the after cooler. From the after cooler the raw water goes to the engine coolant heat exchanger and then the raw water cools the exhaust. The after cooler is the first place that gets blocked up when you have issues of unwanted muscle invasion or trash getting through your sea strainers. There still may be enough water flow to keep the engine from alarm point for a time, but not enough cooling water to cool the hot exhaust gasses that is making contact to that rubber bellows in the exhaust system down line. The rubber bellows becomes the weak link and the high water bilge alarm or fire alarm goes off first and then your whole day gets ruined.
  12. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    If these were really modern 3500 Engines you will find the FO Cooler is not in the SW System
  13. C4ENG

    C4ENG Senior Member

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    2010 44 meter Benetti Vision. 35 series CAT with a fuel oil heat exchanger sea water cooled circled in red.

    Attached Files:

  14. C4ENG

    C4ENG Senior Member

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    Also not to mention that the fwd plate coolers on the modern 35 series that are sea water cooled are used to cool the fuel oil as well the engine coolant but I am not here trying to show how big my **** is.
  15. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    To avoid confusion the point I was trying to make was any fouling of the plate coolers will cause the whole engine a problem as everything is integrated.

    On a properly setup and installed one there will be a number of set points in the AMS that will draw your attention to a problem long before it leads to sinking the boat.

    Just because Benetti cheaps it out don't assume all builders do it.

    Even though it is called a 2010 Model, do you have any idea when the equipment was made?
  16. C4ENG

    C4ENG Senior Member

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    It looks like your avatar picture is of a 35 series sea water cooled heat exchanger that cools both engine coolant and fuel oil HAHAHA! I am sorry you put your foot in your mouth with me today
  17. AlfredZ

    AlfredZ Senior Member

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    Hi there,

    One question if I may ask, between the initial mayday and the rescue was a long period of seven hours, and I assume that the mayday was not initiated because they THOUGHT this will happen, they called because it has already happened! So, how long before that do you think the problem started for it to become beyond saving the day at the time of mayday? Then, as I think, the bellows problem is not enough to cause the flooding of the water tight compartment on the weather deck, and this engine room had 3 pumps, and both engines (or at least the functioning one) could be a fourth pump. There is for sure a more major factor than this that led to this catastrophy, any ideas? Some other forums are talking about the waterline glass frames giving way under pressure! Still not so convincing though arguable.

    Attached are the plans for the bilge, lower and main decks. (In a later post, because the size is rather bigger than 100k's!)

    Cheers.
  18. AlfredZ

    AlfredZ Senior Member

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    Hi all,

    Here are the plans in JPG format. Hope you find them helpful to finding more clues or guides.

    Cheers.

    Attached Files:

  19. AlfredZ

    AlfredZ Senior Member

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    This is the first report I read with many of the known facts put together!

    Source: ************* - Report by: Diane Bryne
    "Last Friday news spread quickly about the sudden sinking of Yogi in Greece. Dozens of websites both within and outside of the yachting industry have been reporting the news since then. Unfortunately, as is often the case in situations like this, incorrect reports have been published and assumptions have been made. In this editor’s opinion, the speculation needs to stop—now.

    First, the facts according to the Hellenic Coast Guard. The 204-foot (60.2-meter) Yogi was 19 nautical miles off the coast of Skyros, Greece, early Friday morning when the captain contacted the Coast Guard. He reported that Yogi had suffered mechanical failure, was unmanageable due to the weather conditions, and was flooding. Eight individuals, all crew and including himself, were aboard. As for the weather conditions, the Coast Guard reports that they were Force 8, a gale with winds between 34 and 40 knots and seas of 18 to 25 feet (5.5 to 7.5 meters). Two rescue helicopters were dispatched, as were additional Coast Guard vessels. A Navy frigate and four commercial vessels in the area also responded. Video footage shot from one of the Coast Guard helicopters shows all eight people aboard the megayacht were in survival suits on an upper deck when rescue operations began, and Yogi was on her starboard side. The Coast Guard states it took a little over an hour to safely get everyone off the yacht. They were then taken ashore for medical evaluation.

    Another fact, from Proteksan Turquoise, which delivered Yogi in 2011: Yogi had been at its yard in Turkey just prior to the accident for repaint work under warranty. (Some news reports have indicated the warranty work involved the interior.)

    Last fact, at this point: The cause of the sinking remains under investigation."

    Cheers.
  20. 84far

    84far Senior Member

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    Is it possible that Yogi could have lost her large side windows (near the waterline), when/if she turned side-on with the waves... with a lose of power she wouldn't of had use of her stabs, and she would really start rolling...?

    Personally I can see **** really hitting the fan when those windows blow out, and really adding to there problems. (Speculation)

    Far

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