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Princess or Sunseeker

Discussion in 'Princess Yacht' started by dino_dino, Jun 17, 2010.

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  1. dino_dino

    dino_dino New Member

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    Hello all

    Well, I did get my first boat here, a 32 Windy. Nice boat, but to to small for what I wanted. Why I did go for it?
    Well, I was new to boating, and wanted to start out with a small boat and work my way up.
    Now I feel I am ready to try something bigger. I have tried 45 Princess the last 3 weeks, great boat. And the view from the flybridge is just superb:)

    I have been looking around and I like to get a flybridge boat, 40-50 feet.
    The boats I do like in stye and quality feel are the Princess and Sunseeker. I just like the solid feeling.
    Am I right in that?

    But, price......Will I be better of with a 2-3 year newer boat from Princess, than more used and older from Sunseeker.

    Some tip/help is good for me. Also, something I need to look out/for when seeking around for a boat like these?

    Thanks
  2. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    When I'm with clients looking for a boat and their debating whether to go for say a 40 or a 45 I always tell them to go for the bigger one as they'll be there within 3 years anyway, and this way they'll save one brokers fee. Princess and Sunseekers are both very good boats. What it really comes down to is style. Sunseekers are more glitzy and generally faster. They're also generally more expensive to run and maintain. My experience with Princess is from the Viking Sport Cruiser which is the Americanized version. The Sunseeker gets more ooohs and aahs at the dock from the average layperson, the Princess gets them more from real boaters. I personally like the handling and seakindlyness of the Princess more (Sunseekers tend to pound in a head sea) although it's fun cruising at 36 kts. as long as I'm not buying the fuel.
  3. dino_dino

    dino_dino New Member

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    Thanks for helping me.

    Well, I do see what you mean, the Sunseeker is more a sports car on water, which makes it more expensive to run and own.

    Then I will look more for a Princess/Viking boat and also look more for a larger end one, and maybe step back some years in order to get a 45+ foot one.

    Thanks for helping me, all help and information is great
  4. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    I used to run an '02 50' VSC. Can't find much bad to say about it. We had the small Volvos, cruised at 19-21 kts. and topped out about 26 kts. Respectable. We burned up to about 33gph. The smaller moters left plenty of space in the engine room to move about. You have another fellow on here (Silver Lining) who bought an '' '01 I believe, with Cats. He accessed the engineroom from the salon as opposed to the aft deck access on the '02. The Cats were a bit cramped and I wasn't thrilled with the salon access, but I hear he's thrilled with his boat and has been doing extensive cruising with it.
  5. MaxPower

    MaxPower Senior Member

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    i had the opportunity to drive around a princess 62 for a while & was quite impressed by the way she handled. i really loved the boat ... it was on my shortlist at no. 2 ...

    i haven't driven a sunseeker tho ...
  6. dino_dino

    dino_dino New Member

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    Well, thanks all for the information and help.

    Yes, I love to have a Sunseeker, but my budget says no.....Yes, from what I am told, and able to find out I CAN get one, bit it will be a lot older than a Viking/Princess and cost me more money.....hmmmmmm.......


    THe Viking/Princess are not bad boats, just more relaxed in style, if one can say that.
    Wil go and look at a V55 tomorrow, will let you all know how it turns out


    Thanks for helping me
  7. dino_dino

    dino_dino New Member

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    Hello all

    well, sorry it was a P50 Princess and not a V50 I did have a day in.
    But, what a boat. I am far far from any expert, but I do get the feeling that Princess/Viking SC are well made boats.
    She was well putt together, easy to access engine room, easy to move around there. Nice helm, good visibility, I think so, and the flybridge helm really makes it "easy" to maneuver around in the harbor. Ups, talking like a real captain now, but it did feel easy, was able to look all around. Nice feeling.

    Also the electric quite flus toilets was great, so much better than the vacuum one. Yes, I do se the need for the vacuum toilet where it is rough sea, but here on "my" lake, no ned in my mind.
    Bow thrusters did help me a lot.

    Washing machine is nice to.

    So, yes she has a lot of toys, things my last boat did not have, but things that will make the say on board more comfortable, and then she will be used more. I do seek a boat that will be used as a home away from home.
    Will I go for her?
    Not sure, have to go and take a look at one V50 next week. But, the flybridge layout was nice.........

    Thanks for looking all
  8. MaxPower

    MaxPower Senior Member

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    i personally found the advantage of the flybridge at night ..... unlimited visibility, as opposed to helm instrument reflection on the windscreen down below.

    in these waters where i sail, there are too many tiny craft running around, and extremely difficult to see at night. the flybridge becomes a welcome advantage.
  9. dino_dino

    dino_dino New Member

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    Thanks for the reply.

    Well, that sounds just right. Also here it is LOTS of small crafts around, so the Flybridge will help me also away from the berth, harbor area.

    Thanks for good help
  10. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    That brings to mind a few downsides for the bridge boats: In a crowded area you may be held down to 4 kts to avoid ticking people off with your wake whereas, with an express style you can usually get away with 7 to 9 kts. in the same situation. Docking an express is easier since you carry less windage, and visability when reversing into a slip is much better. In large, following seas an upper helm can be like riding a rollercoaster although our 50VSC also had a lower helm station which was great in rough seas and bad weather. The cabin on an express is a bit like being in a basement though which makes the bridge boat better for entertaining. The 'WOW factor' is certainly more with a bridge boat.
  11. dino_dino

    dino_dino New Member

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    Oh......Have not had that in mind.....:rolleyes:
    Well, oh, what shall I do????
    I also did not think about the wind, I am on a lake, but really there is a lot of wind. And the docking here can be in very, for me, small and narrow docks......Hm. Maybe I am better of with a express after all.
    But, the express does offer less saloon area than the flybridge.

    All I know for sure is these:
    I do like the style and look on the Princes boats, express and flybridge.
    The boat will be used as a home away from home, short trips, long weekends and so. 2-3-4 adults at the time.
    The flybridge gives more saloon room, space for us all.
    BUT, I am far from a experienced captain. So, with that in mind, maybe I better look for an express and move up to the flybridge next time.

    Thanks for help and tip, I need it:)
  12. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    What to do is simple. Consider your needs, list your priorities, count your money and decide what is best for you. There is no right boat for everyone.
    You've mentioned that you're on a lake. How big a lake is it? What style boats are most used on your lake? There was some discussion on another thread with someone who wanted like a 90' yacht when the biggest thing on their lake was about a 60' houseboat and there were no diesel mechanics anywhere close. Will you be using it mostly for day scoots to a swimming hole and an overnight here and there or will you be doing exteended cruises for a week or more or loading it with 10-15 partiers? You mentioned long weekends with 2 to 4 adults. How old and adventurous are they. I'm at an age where a pull-out sofabed isn't appealing. A few years ago a sleeping bag would have been fine. Kids??? Kids tend to enjoy smaller boats more. Had a client with a 51 SF who had to fight to get his kids on board. When they did come they hung in the cabin playing video games. The boat rarely fished, rarely hit rough water and he had outriggers because he liked the way they looked (never got used). Once I left his employ the boat rarely moved because it was a project for just the family to take out. They'd have had so much more fun with a 30' express. Forget other's opinions about what is best other than brand. This one is for you and your family. The right style and size is the one you will get the most use of. I'm not much of a lake person, but I just made a run through Lake Erie (one of our "Great Lakes". If I boated there I'd want an express under 45'. The lake is I think about 200nm x 25nm maybe. A bigger boat would be a hassle to get into some of the more interesting areas like the western Erie Canal which has low bridges.
    The bigger the boat the more maintenance involved and the bigger a project it is to take it out. On our 50 VSC the owner used my services, but mostly just as a ride along. He started with a 46 Carver on which I taught him. That boat could be handled by 2, but it broke down so often he just didn't feel safe without me, plus it was lousy in rough seas. When he moved to the 50VSC, that boat was complex enough and we expanded our cruising area to where it was just a good idea to have a captain even if he did most of the driving. I handled the deck, maintained the boat, watched over his shoulder to make sure he stayed safe and took over when things got tense. (BTW, with a 50+ it's a good bet that your insurance company will require you to have a captain for the first year at least). That owner just downsized to a 40 express after 6 years of boating. This he can take out by himself for a scoot around the bays. I'm now teaching him to single-hand. I'll go along on longer runs. Lots of things to consider, and for the amount of money involved there should be. Good luck.
  13. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Not always so. It's more a balance of the right number of hours for the right number of years and how the boat was treated. I'd rather a 5 year old boat with 900 hours owned by an experienced boater with no kids and who didn't sleep on board than a 3 year old with 80 hours owned by novice with 5 kids. Warranty is another issue. I'd rather an out of warranty boat for less $$ over one with a year left. That way I'm not stuck trying to get service from someone who doesn't care. Save me the money up front and I'll put it back into the boat where I think it's needed using the people I know to be good.
  14. dino_dino

    dino_dino New Member

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    Hmmm..Thanks a lot:)
    Yes, as you say, I need to make a list of what the boat will be used for.
    Well, she will be used as a home, away from home. And the adults onboard are seeking comfort, and not just a small pull out bed. So, it will need to have cabins for 4 adults.

    She will be used for day trips, one or two nights or longer trips, like a weekend, a week and so.
    The lake is 68 km long and 3-5 km wide. There is a lot of sail boats here, windy here, and small to medium boats. Well, that is from 30 feet and so. The biggest boats are around 55-65 feet. So, I am in the upper league, if I go for the 50 feet boat.
    There are lots and lots of small docks, with good food and so, but maybe hard to access with a larger flybridge boat.

    Well, I am off to look at a V42, express from Princess/Viking, a 2007 model. Will let you all know how it goes.
  15. dino_dino

    dino_dino New Member

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    Thanks for the good tip and information.

    The V42 I am off to look at is a owned by the Princess dealer here in Switzerland. So she is with warranty, and I guess also taken care of. Not been used for over nights and also the kitchen never been used for more than making client coffee.
  16. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    If my conversion is correct that's about 35 miles by 2 miles or so. Very small for a 50' yacht that can go end to end in about 2 hours, but I understand the housing need. Around here we'd be looking for a houseboat on a lake like that. Are places you'd want to go (restaurants, bars, etc.) accessable to a 50? I'm pretty sure that in Europe this won't be a problem, but let's check anyway. Do you have diesel fuel stations, diesel marine mechanics and haulout facilities accessable and can such a yacht be transported to your lake?
    Lots to consider, but better now than after you put money down.
  17. dino_dino

    dino_dino New Member

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    What shall I do with out your help??
    Thanks.

    Well, yes, there are Princess mechanics here, for Volvo boat engines and so. there are several boat shops with dock and mechanics.
    There was sold a new Princess Flybridge V42 here 2 weeks ago. I did talk to the owner, and she told me she was happy with that size, used to have a 440 Princess.

    Some of the bars and restaurants are accessible with a V42 she sad, even larger to, not all of them.
    Diesel is also not a problem along the lake, swiss and italian side.

    Yes, we in europe are crazy, a 42+ boat is large for that size of a lake, but the boats here are used a lot as homes, and the house boats do not look so good.....:)
    The boat will also be used during winter time.

    Thanks for helping me
  18. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Know what you mean about the houseboats.;) Good luck. Keep us posted on your progress.
  19. MaxPower

    MaxPower Senior Member

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    as a mute point ...

    i had a 12m (42') cabin cruiser ... and loved it's handling ...

    when i decided to upgrade to a 63' flybridge boat, i believed that the learning curve would be steep, in terms of coming to grips with the extra size while berthing.

    i have to admit that altho i was petrified of dinging the boat on day one, she was easier to handle than my 42', probably due to it's extra weight.

    day 2 onwards, i found there was no need to even use the thrusters for berthing/unberthing.

    my $0.02 ...
  20. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    You got that exactly right. The only real hard part is getting over the intimidation factor. Another one comes when people move up from single to twin I/O until I tell them "You don't know how much easier your life just got". 63' is more work than 42 though and really needs someone to deckhand where a 42 can be single handed much easier. It's also more expensive when you screw up, which may account for much of the intimidation factor:eek: .

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