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PLASTIC BAGS and our WATER WORLD

Discussion in 'YachtForums Yacht Club' started by brian eiland, Jul 7, 2008.

  1. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    and there be the rub as they say.:cool:
  2. jhall767

    jhall767 Senior Member

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    The problem with all these "solutions" is they are never thought all the way through. Especially those mandated by government.

    Lead additive was banned from gasoline. MTBE was going to be much safer. Now we find out that MTBE will penetrate into ground water and travel great distances.

    Years ago there was a big push around here to stop using paper bags because paper grocery bags were deforesting the planet. Plastic was much better...

    When they started recycling locally the residents were required to wash all glass containers before putting them out for recycling. When the did a study they found that the water and energy used for cleaning the glass was more than what was saved by recycling. They've since changed the policy.

    We're now moving to EF15 gas using 15% ethanol. Unfortunately it takes almost the equivalent petroleum energy to convert food into ethanol as it would to just use the gasoline in the first place. However the farm and automotive industries love it.

    We're switching to fluorescent bulbs for everything. In addition to poor light quality they are creating a mercury hazard in our our landfills as they are not universally recycled. Or they break in the recycling dumpster...

    I'm all for saving the planet but as others have said most of the things we are doing do a better job of making somebody money than cleaning up the planet.
  3. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Bottlemania

    Bottled-water companies haul in $11 billion a year in the U.S., with the help of marketing campaigns that describe the stuff as pristine and natural-that is, better than tap water. Yet 4? percent of the bottled water produced here comes from the same municipal sources as tap, and 85 percent of the 30 to �0 billion plastic water bottles sold end up in landfills. Or consider that shipping one million gallons of "untouched-by-man" Fiji water to New York City dumps 190 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, nearly 1 0 times as much as the average American produces in 3 year. In Bottlemania, Elizabeth Royte reveals these truths and more, as she examines the evolving debate over who owns water: the corporations that pump millions of gallons from springs and aquifers for pennies, or the locals who see little of the cash but must deal with environmental side effects and sputtering spigots.

    -BJORN CAREY

    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb242/is_200807/ai_n32306285/

    ...and you have to wonder where a LOT of those empty plastic bottles end up :eek:
  4. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    There's no stopping it as long as a dollar or yen is to be made. Why bother to fight it. Give in, let our race kill itself off and get it over with so more deserving animals can take over. Spend your time and efforts explaining to your grandkids why they will never have grandkids. All hail the cockroach and horseshoe crab.:rolleyes:
  5. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    'PlasTiki, out to draw attention to ocean pollution and acidification

    Sail-World Cruising followed Plastiki's crossing of the Pacific with six crew with regular updates. They weren't fast, in fact she sailed like a dog, but she was made of recycled material and owner David de Rothchild, sailor, explorer and global green leader was not out to go fast, he was out to make a point.

    The point was to draw attention to the gross waste and pollution of the Western world, and in this he succeeded brilliantly - now there is the book.

    In it he recounts the extraordinary Pacific-crossing voyage of the Plastiki, an innovative and mostly untested sixty-foot sailing catamaran that floats on 12,500 reclaimed plastic bottles.

    ....more here
    Sail-World.com : Plastiki - the book of a very Green adventure

    Attached Files:

  6. Old Phart

    Old Phart Senior Member

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    I dunno
    Did it cover all the Pacific trash from the Japanese tsunami?

    A book, you say?

    Is it online or in print?

    How many copies?

    How many trees died for the printing?

    How much Green will be added to his bank account?

    Reclaimed plastic bottles are the result of recycling.

    Is he against recycling?
  7. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    I don't know, can't you read :(
  8. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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  9. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Jacques Cousteau remembered

    The thought occurred to me that one thing we really need is another Jacques Cousteau, and those fabulous TV shows he brought to us. They made me want to become an oceanographer originally.

    Jacques Cousteau - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jacques Cousteau - The Aqua Lung - Jacques Cousteau Videos - Biography.com

    Jacques Cousteau Biography - Facts, Birthday, Life Story - Biography.com

    Perhaps we should start a petition drive for a TV network to begin a 'rerun' of these fabulous shows.
  10. HTMO9

    HTMO9 Senior Member

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    Plastic bags and bottles on our oceans.

    This "Plastic Problem" with floating junk on our oceans is getting bigger and bigger. And it is causing more and more (and new) problems.

    This men made floating islands meanwhile reach the size of a whole country. Not only, that animals get entangled in this junk and consequently die, this plastic stuff gets destroyed by sunrays and waves. The pieces get smaller and smaller until they get attractive for all kinds of species and mistaken for food. By this tragedy, this artificial material enters the food chain and finally gets on our plates.

    A fairly new problem is the danger for the shipping world. We get reports of commercial ships, which had emergency engine shutdowns in mid ocean, because of floating plastic entering the cooling circuit and clogging the raw water filters and their bypathes. In order to prevent overheat, the engine shut down. That is no fun no more.

    My question to that problem (and maybe one kind of solution) is, how can we stop that pollution and recover this junk from our oceans????

    It seems to be, that certain people on this world have no attitude towards our nature and their preservation. The only way to make them recognize this problem is, to make saving mother nature profitable.

    So, let them find out, that recycling carbon hydrogen based materials is more profitable than throwing it away. We have to teach them by acting as a model. Waste separation and source segregated recycling works, it has been proven.

    But what shall we do with all that stuff, floating around allready on our oceans? It will not diseppear on its own.

    Why not start harvesting it. I did not say collecting, I do mean harvesting, in order to make profit out of it.

    Allmost anything that floats, will burn (not ships, gentlemans:)). Several little fleets, composed of a self loading bulk carrier and some fishing trawler type boats with large surface nets, could collect that plastic material, hand it over to the bulk carrier and he transports it to shore based power stations or recycling plants for further treatment. We are talking about high value recources!!!!.

    The biggest problem, I see with this method at the moment, are those animals like turtles or dolphins living or hiding in these junk clouds. The fishing method would have to assure the survival of those species during the harvest.

    TBC
  11. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Turning Plastic Back into Oil

    I'm assuming you saw some of these previous postings,....like this?
    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/85297-post51.html



    Turning Plastic back into Oil
    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/yachtforums-yacht-club/15281-turning-plastic-back-into-oil-came.html

    Converting Plastic into Oil
    Converting Plastic to Oil
  12. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Think Your Plastic is Being Recycled, Think Again?
    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/09/18/1239747/-Think-your-plastic-is-being-recycled-Think-again?



    Think those plastic items you carefully separate from the rest of your trash are being responsibly recycled? Think again. U.S. recycling companies have largely stayed away from recycling plastic and most of it has been shipped to China where it can be processed cheaper. Not anymore. This year China announced a Green Fence Policy, prohibiting much of the plastic recycling they once imported:

    For many environmentally conscious Americans, there’s a deep satisfaction to chucking anything and everything plasticky into the recycling bin—from shampoo bottles to butter tubs—the types of plastics in the plastic categories #3 through #7. Little do they know that, even if their local trash collector says it recycles that waste, they might as well be chucking those plastics in the trash bin.

    “[Plastics] 3-7 are absolutely going to a landfill—[China's] not taking that any more… because of Green Fence,” David Kaplan, CEO of Maine Plastics, a post-industrial recycler, tells Quartz. “This will continue until we can do it in the United States economically.”
    U.S. recyclers are scrambling to come up with a solution now that China is drastically cutting back on their top import from the U.S.:

    China's demand for low-cost recycled raw materials has meant waste shipments from Europe, the US, Japan and Hong Kong have arrived thick and fast, with scrap becoming the top US export to China by value ($11.3bn) in 2011.
    China controls a large portion of the recycling market, importing about 70% of the world's 500m tonnes of electronic waste and 12m tonnes of plastic waste each year. Sudden Chinese policy changes therefore have a significant impact on the global recycling trade, which puts pressure on western countries to reconsider their reliance on the cost-effective practice of exporting waste, a habit that's reinforced by a lack of domestic recycling infrastructure and a lower demand for secondary raw materials.

    China's Green Fence policy just might spur the U.S. government and recyclers into much-needed innovation:
    Historically, higher labor costs and environmental safety standards made processing scrap into raw materials much more expensive in the US than in China. So the US never developed much capacity or technology to sort and process harder-to-break down plastics like #3 through #7.
    Green Fence might be a chance to change that, says Mike Biddle, CEO of California-based recycling company MBA Polymers. “China’s Green Fence offers a real opportunity to the US government and recycling industry to step up its efforts on recycling and catalyze a strong domestic recycling market in the US,” Biddle said at a recent webinar on Green Fence.
    Some U.S. recycling companies are applauding the news:
    The policy also has leveled the playing field by allowing large-scale companies that have invested additional money in pollution control and recycling services to operate at a more equal and fair-cost level, according to Kathy Xuan, CEO of full-service recycler Parc Corp. of Romeoville, Ill.
    With China taking a harder look at the plastic waste it imports, U.S.-based recyclers are looking for opportunities in the changing global market.
    Parc has doubled production in the last six months, Xuan said in a July 2 webinar hosted by the Society of the Plastics Industry Inc. of Washington.
    The opportunity for big change (and big profits) is there. Let's hope the U.S. government and recycling companies don't throw away the opportunity to lead the way.


    Perhaps its time to look at that solution in the preceding posting above,....turning it back into oil...
  13. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Adidas brings its ocean plastic footwear to the masses

    There's a huge amount of plastic swirling around in the ocean and some long-term plans to clean it up, but Adidas has some short-term plans to put at least some of it to use. The sportswear manufacturer has today announced that its footwear made from the ocean's plastic waste will be available to buy this month, and has put together some recycled plastic jerseys for a couple of big-name soccer clubs to help mark the occasion.

    Adidas has teamed up with environmental organization Parley for the Oceans to make the shoes, which draws the plastic waste materials from the coastal areas of the Maldives. The two joined forces last year to help increase awareness and drive new technologies to retrieve and recycle ocean plastic debris. They first produced a limited run of 50 recycled plastic shoes last year, and are now bringing the eco-minded footwear to market.

    The knitted upper part of Adidas' UltraBoost Uncaged Parley trainers is made from a mix of 95 percent recycled ocean plastic and recycled polyester. The rest, such as the laces, heel cap and lining is made from recycled materials.

    Meanwhile, two of Europe's soccer giants in Real Madrid and Bayern Munich will this month take to the field in jerseys made from Parley's recycled ocean plastic. Bayern's recycled red shirt will be on display when it takes on TSG 1899 Hoffenheim on Saturday, while Real Madrid will show off its white version later this month on November 26 against Real Sporting de Gijón.

    Both jerseys will be available from the Adidas online store (Bayern Munich's from today and Real Madrid's from November 24) though there is no word yet on pricing. The footwear will be available online from mid-November and priced at €200 (US$222). The company says, however, that it will make one million pairs in 2017, a tally that would remove eleven million bottles from the ocean.

    http://newatlas.com/adidas-ocean-plastic-footwear/46295/

    adidas-plastic-shoes-4.jpeg
  14. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    ...from another forum where I posted a similar subject thread...

  15. Das Scorpion

    Das Scorpion Member

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    Plastic bags? Paper of plastic? Lord how much I hear about plastic bags when im at the cash regester, yeup im a squidward. I have an attitude when I am up there. LOL! I had an idea, recycle the plastic, it can be done. Or find a rocket load it up and shoot it into space, deep space. Plenty of el-cheapo rockets out there, load it up and launch it. Remember our planet is but a speck of sand in a large ocean of stars, who would really care? Vulcans? Nah....;) Load -n-launch to deep space, bam done!;) ariane-5-rakete-mit-zwei-satelliten-an-bord-gestartet-190621-99-736679-image.jpeg.jpeg.jpg
  16. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Marshall Medoff unveils to 60 Minutes his innovative method of turning plant life into fuel and other useful products

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/marsha...ing-inedible-plant-life-into-fuel-60-minutes/


    excerpt....
  17. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2020
  18. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    Yes plastic in the ocean is tragic, I think we can all agree to that.

    But the bulk of it doesn’t come from the developed world it comes from xxxxholes like China, India, Pakistan and the likes.

    effective Jan 1 at the Bahamas has banned the used of single use plastic. Hey that s great... many cities here in the US have banned plastic bags as well along with styrofoam. Is it going to make a diffwrwnce to the massive amount of plastic floating in the pacific, of course not

    I guess whoever produces that slick video decided to be PC and depicted aplastic bottle dumped off the US coast... that s BS. Again point the finger at China who is not going to change their attitude anytime soon. Heck they can’t even give their citizens basic hygiene and are a repeated source of deadly viruses...

    we often take trash bags with us when going to ocean side beaches in the Exumas and collect trash. Guess what? The printing or embossing on most of the trash isn’t in English... it is in chinese, Russian, Arabic etc... yes even in the Atlantic!!!

    but hey like global warming, recycling and plastic recovery is big business... lots of money to be made by taking us on a guilt trip so elaborate it would make a catholic priest drool with envy :) those two guys selling bracelets on TV are paying the ads, and their staff, with hard cash...

    Sure some plastics can be replaced. Like styrofoam with carton or other forms of disposable like palm front plates which we ve been using for a while. Heck they only cost on 10 times the price of plastic but for us it s not problem. Now how is this going work at a fish fry in the Bahamas or a food shack with locals that have already been taxed to poverty with 12% VAT?? They can’t afford to pay 5 to 10 times more for a disposable plate or burger box or conch salad bowl... while the Commies in China dump their trash in their rivers ....
  19. Sea Gull

    Sea Gull Member

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  20. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    If we could find a way to use this plastic for rocket fuel.