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PARI Aground in France

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by K1W1, Jun 2, 2009.

  1. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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  2. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    i know accident can and do happen but there is no excuse for this. a $200 GPS could have saved the day... hmm.. the night.
  3. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    Even without a GPS a basic safety precaution such as an Anchor Watch would have done a pretty effective job of warning there was a problem and given time to do something about it- I am assuming here that the boat was not anchored 50 m off the rocks with 30 m of swinging room:)
  4. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    That's why I had suggested you grab a hook in calm PJ harbor that windy night last year when you went to the Thimbles. I can't sleep on the hook unless I have someone standing anchor watch even with an anchor alarm (afraid I could sleep through it).
    Wonder who was standing anchor watch on this one or don't these yachts think that's needed.
  5. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    well on a boat that size, with mutiple crew, it's obvious that maintaining a watch should be normal procedure.

    watching the forecast and anchoring accordingly is a must. in theThimbles for instance, you can pick your side depending on the winds, you obviously want to be on the lee of the islands to have time to react should the anchor drag.

    The buzzer on the Garmin I use is loud enough to wake just about anyone, (well maybe except the average teenager!). There is also a low battery warning although ialways put a fresh pair of AA in when i go to bed.

    what i like is having the ability to set the alarm based on the conditions like scope, amount of room available, etc... You can also set it pretty close so that a moderate wind shift will trigger the alarm. havign it next to the bed means that if it goes off, I can just look at the screen and see if we're dragging or if the wind just shifted. No need to get up as you'd have to with a remote buzzer off the main nav system.

    on this trip up, i must have spent 15 nights on the hook, the GPS allowed me to sleep well!
  6. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    LOVE GARMIN!!! Always use mine in addition to whatever is on board. It gives me a ton of info, exactly the info I want and has never blanked on me as Furuno, Northstar and just about all others have done. I too always awake to alarms or changes of the boat's motion, but still couldn't do the hook without someone awake and on duty no matter what the size vessel. I know sailboaters and trawlers do it all the time. I just have too many "What if's" running through my mind at all times.
  7. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    dont' get me started on Furunos...

    not too many what ifs if you take minimal precautions like checking the forecast, picking the right spot and most importantly using the right gound tackle. At night, I typically increase scope to 8 or 9:1, all chain which that alone insures good holding.
  8. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Not saying you're wrong. Just not for me. I've done a lot of anchoring and only had two drags (never when asleep or away from the boat), but that's enough to keep me awake. Two days ago I had a beautiful day and night before...except for the major squall that blew through for 1 1/2 hours starting at 0600. Yesterday was beautiful with light south winds ....except for the north blow in the early morning and the major blow that came in with 25kt. west winds at about 1600. I'll stay docked unless someone is staying awake.
  9. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    often, these blow are forecasted. I left Newport yesterday and came in Nantucket around 4PM... it indeed blowing 20 G 25 as forecast.

    obviously sometimes they're not. A memorable blow was last fall, we were anchored in Cape Look Out bight when the forecasted 20/25 became 40 to 50. Needless to say, I didn't sleep until things calmed down by dawn!

    otherwise, plenty of scope and the GPS will do it for me.
  10. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

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  11. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    Yea I heard about the "Pari" situation. Isn't that in the same general area as where the Sloop "Mirabella V" went aground some years ago?
  12. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Until it walks into my stateroom and throws a glass of cold water in my face someone is staying awake.:)
  13. Mike448

    Mike448 Member

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    Seeing any yacht in that condition is very sad and will give any mariner goosebumps. We can all sit in the warmth of our homes / cabins and comment on the whys and how’s, and easily point the finger of blame – heck I’ve done it before.

    But what worries me is the bigger picture. It has been inevitable that something like this would happen in our industry and unfortunately it probably won’t be the last.

    We have all talked about the work loads imposed on crew when guests are aboard may times before. It is no secret that even though agencies like the MCA are trying hard to regulate the minimum hours of rest for crew per week, but when we have guests aboard and are trying hard to put on a good show we routinely exceed these guidelines. We’ve all done it, and will probably continue to do so.

    This is especially prevalent in yachts with 6-10 crew. Consider the deck crew who are up at sunrise to shammy off and uncover. Then a hard day in the sun tending to the guests' needs, before standing paserelle watch while they have dinner or go out clubbing. And finally its up anchor or lines off at midnight to move the yacht 6 hours to the next port in preparation for another day. Considering that the average 30-50m yacht has 3-5 people in the deck department, incl the captain, there just is not enough hours in the day to do all this and get sufficient rest. But we do it anyway, because its “expected”.

    Now I’m not saying that this is what happened to Pari; we may never know really what happened aboard. But this kind of scenario will continue to happen, and in time another yacht will have another accident, whether dragging anchor, suffering a collision at night, or worse.

    What is the answer? I have no idea ....

    As a side note, I am lucky enough to now have 25 crew working for me. Whether at anchor or docked we always run a routine with 1 deckcrew & 1 stewardess working the night shift which means we always have someone “bright eyed & bushy tailed” on deck round the clock. In this way we are fortunate. But to be honest, I still sleep with one eye open when at anchor
    :cool:
  14. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Owners often act like they're allowing me to play and get paid for it when they ask me to move their boat. Rarely do they consider the time or trouble involved getting myself home, much less that I'm spending X hours taking care of someone's very expensive vessel and we can't stop concentrating for one second under who-know-what conditions. I doubt that many people give a thought to the fact that a crew may basically be on duty 24/7 for several days at a time. It's important for the captain of any size vessel to make sure his crew gets proper rest and time off duty. If a boat needs 5 crew and the owner authorizes 3 they have to get the work of 3.
  15. revdcs

    revdcs Senior Member

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  16. SeattleMike

    SeattleMike New Member

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    Two observations

    1) You have to wonder what kind of insurance are they carrying and who gets paid out on a claim?

    and

    2) This is a prime example of why we will never see nuclear-powered pleasure craft, no matter how safe (or small) they manage to make the reactor unit.
  17. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    1) I'd guess a 10% deductable so this is an expensive oops.
    2) :eek:
  18. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

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    Would that were true in the real world.
  19. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Mind you, I wrote that after doing 9 days straight of 8 to 12 hour runs plus fueling, cleanup, engine room checks and plotting. Preaching is much easier than practicing.:(
  20. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Saw this report and a couple of photos:

    Sailing Anarchy
    Does this scene look kinda familiar? The megayacht Pari went onto rocks this weekend, off Saint Jean Cap Ferrat, in the very spot where the Mirabella V grounded some years ago but, without a keel to hold her back, this one ended up closer to shore. The reason for the grounding is still not known, but locals assume that it was the same reason, the anchor dragging in a strong north easterly wind.

    Official reports say there has been no pollution, but locals say there is a strong smell of diesel. An anti-pollution barrier has now been put in place and there are plans to pump out approximately 30,000 liters of fuel as soon as weather conditions permit. Plans to remove the 40 meter yacht from the rocks are still under discussion, between the vessels insurers, the owner and the Affaires Maritimes, since divers have reported that the aluminum hull has been damaged in several places.

    The captain of the Pari has remained on board, but the seven other people on board were evacuated by the Croizet Fire Brigade, which was alerted by CROSS Med, together with the Marine Nationale’s Dauphin helicopter and the harbor tug Triton from Nice. Several large yachts, reported to have included Larry Ellison’s Rising Sun, offered assistance

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