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Opinion regarding a particular 65'

Discussion in 'Donzi/Roscioli Yacht' started by Manny, Jun 11, 2009.

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  1. Manny

    Manny Senior Member

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    Hello all

    I'm making this thread to see what everyone else thinks regarding a particular 65' Donzi I'm considering to buy. During the Miami show, I made a side-trip to see an enclosed 1990 65' Donzi, and see if I'd try my luck once more in buying a Donzi. I went to see it and the boat was absolutely spectacular. Beautiful inside and out with hundreds of thousands of dollars put in on updates. THe interior woodwork was completely redone beautifully and the entire boat was painted no more than a year ago. Electronics couldnt be any better: 2 navnet GPS's, new built-in computer, new trimtabs, new autopilot, absolutely every single electronic made new. Even has this really expensive night vision that projects in some color at night. It has 2 brand new 25KW Onan's. Engines had only 40 hours. After I was done seeing the boat, I made an offer for $400,000, and the owner accepted. that made me consider buying it.

    On top of all that, it's my favorite model year(1990) with my ideal interior.

    This is the catch that's still making me hesitate.

    It's underpowered with 12v92 engines. THat very same boat was owned by a good friend of mine when it was new, and I remember that boat cruising no more than 18 knots, and probably not even that.

    So what do you think, should I go ahead and buy it despite the engines or should I wait a little longer and see if I can find another with better engines. THing is, to find another in condition like this and for the same price(or even close to this price) will be extremely hard.

    WHat do you all think?

    THanks
  2. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Well the speed is a consideration that is based solely upon your cruising. If you mostly travel 5 miles and start trolling all day, then what is an extra 7 knots of cruise speed going to do for you. You could always repower and sell the 12v92's and put whatever you want in there if the price of the vessel or you plan on keeping it a long time and that justifies it. If it's completely what you want otherwise, unless you plan on taking 100+ NM trips on a regular basis I wouldn't worry about it. It sounds like a very nice boat.

    However, I would never make an offer unless I was prepared to buy something. Why waste someone's time and get their hopes up unless you're serious. I could see backing out based upon a bad seatrial or something.
  3. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    As Capt J said, only you can decide how important the cruise speed is.

    If you have an offer that was accepted, your contract should include a sea trial, surveys, etc..

    Do the sea trial and see how the boat performs. basing your decision on what you remembered from years ago isn't enough.

    If the boat is underpowered and doens't performed to your expectations, you can reject the vessel and will get your deposit back. Do that before spending any money on surveys.

    As to repowering, it's an option... expensive and not always easy but if it is your dream boat, if the price is right, why not... If original and the boat was used, the almost 20 year old DDs, must be getting there...
  4. Manny

    Manny Senior Member

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    When I first saw the boat I fell in love with it and was sure I wanted to buy it. I made the offer and told the owner that I'll buy if I get to sell my 54'. I can't have 2 large boats at one time anytime, particularly now that no one's buying boats. It was only afterward that I started thinking about the engines and the cruising speed. I'll definitely do a sea trial once I sell my 54', though. Unfortunetaly the owner doesn't accept trade-in's, so that's out of the question.

    Wouldnt the engines be a bit strained pushing such a heavy boat?

    I'd definitely repower if I could, but that would be too much money. I'd probably do it in the future once I get the money to do so and be comfortable spending it.
  5. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    If the engines are propped to achieve the proper 2300rpm top end then no they won't be strained pushing a heavy boat. Keep in mind I've run several 70-75' Hatteras MY's that are much heavier and have 12v71's put in by the factory.

    Boats are selling right now if they're priced competively. If you're getting a great deal on the Donzi, drop the price on the Bertram and move it. You might be getting less for the Bertram than what you think it's worth, but at the same token you're getting the boat you're buying at less then the seller thinks its worth also.
  6. Manny

    Manny Senior Member

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    yeah but my idea is to sell the bertram for more or less the same as what I'm going to buy the Donzi, that way I won't spend THAT much extra money, so it'd be easier to convince my wife:eek: but in the end I may have to do what you're saying.
  7. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    hehehe, yeah but it's kind of hard justifying a 54' Bertram being worth as much as a 65' Donzi that's updated..... hehehe
  8. Manny

    Manny Senior Member

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    Here's something that's spicing up the decision.

    A friend of mine is thinking about selling his Donzi, and wants me to buy it. Although a price isnt set in stone, I can probably buy it for about the same as the enclosed Donzi in Miami. This one is open, with 16v92's, so it's faster. It also has new 25KW Northern Lights. The boat's in excellent condition with recently rebuilt engines, each having about 450 hours. Only thing is that this one is an older 1987 model, and the interior doesn't appeal to me as much as the enclosed one does. The electronics need an update, and I personally don't like the salon layout. It doesn't have any custom etched windows/mirrors(it's something rather important to me:eek: ). There are just things this one doesn't have that the enclosed does.

    But major advantages that surpass the enclosed is that it's already here, so only there I save about $30,000 that would be spent on any Donzi I'll bring down from anywhere in florida. It's also open, and I personally prefer the open Donzi more. it's considerably faster with the 1692's, but with that it spends more fuel than the enclosed.

    Which one do you think is best?
  9. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Well the interior can be redone to your tastes at your leisure, and you can make a nice interior for $30,000. You know the history of your friends, so there shouldn't be any survey surprises. You can't easily make an enclosed bridge an open bridge. You can also put the electronics you want on it. Well, see what the price is on your friends and go from there. Also, the machinery is the most important part.
  10. Manny

    Manny Senior Member

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    That's what I had in mind if I buy this one instead; redoing the interior completely. I'm just curious on how much it would cost to take out the old bulkhead window, have a new custom etched one made(or buying one already made), installing it, and putting in accent lighting for it. It's something I really want if I get a Donzi. Capt J, would you happen to know how much that would cost?

    I know for a fact that the machinery is just fine. Whenever the owner finds something broken or if something isn't working as it should, instead of fixing it, he replaces it new.

    However, the boat is deteriorating. The full time captain he used to have left about 8 months ago and now he has someone working part time, and a boat with teak and varnish requires someone working full time to keep it neat. The wood requires repainting and some sanding. It needs quite a bit of work, but it's nothing TOO major.
  11. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I have no idea what it costs to etch a window. However I have seen companies here etch a door while it was in-place, they sandblasted it and it looked great and was only about $150. I do not know if that can be done on like a Salon window, but don't see why not.

    Well, come to an agreement on price that's low enough to deal with the hassle and figureing in the cost of redo-ing the varnish and such. If it's just varnish and cleaning teak and painting, I'd figure the labor would be pretty reasonable in PR versus the US. If it's replacing an entire teak deck......well that can get pretty pricey in materials. If you're friend wants to sell it to you, and there aren't any brokers involved and your friend doesn't have to pay a commission.......figure that into the price you offer him.
  12. Manny

    Manny Senior Member

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    On a side note, how much would it cost to put in railing and a teak deck and transom on a boat that has no railing and no teak deck?
  13. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    There is no problem on a boat that money can't fix. Having said that I'd rather spend a few bucks on some etched glass and an interior rehab vs the considerable cost of a re-power. Also, is there a warranty on the 40 hour SMOH 12V92's? I've been told you need to get +100 hours on a rebuilt Detroit before you can be sure that the overhaul OK. If I am wrong on that I'm sure someone will let me know. As far as your plan to sell your old boat for top dollar and steal your bigger better newer boat for about the same $$$. Well, thank you, I needed a good laugh today.
  14. Manny

    Manny Senior Member

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    lol. seemed feasible for a moment. But I realized it's not possible. Only way to pull something like that off is if a hurricane buys it for the insurance cost :D only then will I have that money directly. But I wouldnt ever purposely let that happen.

    as for the warranty, no. that warranty expired years ago.
  15. SHAZAM

    SHAZAM Senior Member

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    Manny, did the owner of the 65 that you're looking at used to own a 50 bertram?
  16. Manny

    Manny Senior Member

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    The owner of the open flybridge one used to own a 54' bertram. the enclosed I dont know. why do you ask?

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