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New Sailing Record Attempt

Discussion in 'General Sailing Discussion' started by YachtForums, Apr 16, 2005.

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  1. “Windrose of Amsterdam” attempts record transatlantic crossing...

    “Windrose”, the 152 ft schooner designed by Gerard Dijkstra, built by Holland Jachtbouw Zaandam, will attempt to beat her 2002 record for a transatlantic schooner crossing this spring. The bid to challenge the record will be made during the Rolex Transatlantic Challenge 2005, organised by the New York Yacht Club. The start is scheduled for 22 May in New York. After a race of almost 3000 sea miles, the race finishes at the Lizard in South England.

    “Windrose” made her record-breaking crossing in 11 days, 10 hours, and 25 minutes. This trimmed one day off the 98-year-old schooner record set by legendary captain Charley Barr in the schooner Atlantic in 1905. With which “Windrose” outstripped the oldest sailing record. The “Windrose” record is acknowledged by the World Sailing Speed Record Council.

    More than 20 mono-hull yachts will be taking part in the Rolex Transatlantic Challenge 2005. The yachts in the race are 70 ft. long, measured over the deck. The event is divided into three sailing categories: classic, performance cruising and grand prix.

    Prior to the Rolex Transatlantic Challenge, “Windrose” will be taking part in the Antigua Classic Race Week from 16 to 18 April. At the end of July, “Windrose” is set for the Tall Ship Race, which starts at Newcastle upon Tyne (UK) and finishes in Frederikstadt, Sweden. The season closes with Sail Amsterdam from 17 to 22 August.

    You can follow reports of the competitions and impressions of the races on www.windrose.nl. Gerard Dijkstra, navigator on board the “Windrose” will be updating the website daily with race reports during the Rolex Transatlantic Challenge.

    For more information on “Windrose”, visit: www.windrose.nl.

    Photo credits: Onne van der Wal
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