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New 55 Hatteras SF, 1271TI's

Discussion in 'Hatteras Yacht' started by g collis, Oct 26, 2015.

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  1. g collis

    g collis Member

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    Nearly swallowed my tongue yesterday. Was talking with the previous owner about his new boat and he said he was going to change his oil. His new boat has the same engines as mine, 12v71TI's and he was using Delo 15w40. Told me he used it in my boat as well. My oil only has about ten hours on it. I explained that DD is very clear about what oil to use in the two stroke. But.....he wasn't convinced. Anyway, when Detroit reopens on Monday I'll get twenty gallons of DD 4oW
    and do a change.
  2. Caltexflanc

    Caltexflanc Senior Member

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    We too were full time liveaboards. As expected the Hatts are heavier boats, my 56MY being 74,000 "dry". (18'2" wide as well).
  3. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    You can use 15w-40 in Detroit Diesel 2 strokes if it's CF-2 rated, D.D. sells 15w-40 that's cf2 rated. That's what D.D. recommends for colder climates, if I remember correctly. Some dealers use it here on DDEC motors from what I've seen as well. I prefer straight 40w in the D.D. 2 strokes.
  4. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    CF-2 in a multi weight?

    DTS.

    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
  5. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    From THE book;
    ddc 2S oil 001a.JPG ddc 2S oil 002b.JPG
  6. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    3. For continuous high temperature operation (over 200 F or 94 C coolant out), the use
    of an SAE grade 50 lubricant in DDC two-stroke cycle Series 53, 71 and 92 engines is
    required. SAE grade 50 lubricants are also required for all Series 149 engines where
    ambient temperatures are above 95 F (35 C).
    4. At ambient temperatures below freezing (32 F or 0 C), sufficient starter cranking speed
    may not be achieved to start the engine with SAE 40 grade oils. Where starting aids are
    not available or at very cold temperatures (0 F to -25 F or -18 C to -32 C) even if
    starting aids are available, the use of multigrade SAE 15W-40 or monograde lubricant
    SAE 30 will improve startability. These lubricants must possess a High Temperature
    – High Shear Rate Viscosity (measured by ASTM D 4741 or equivalent) of 3.70 cP
    minimum. These oils must be replaced with monograde SAE 40 lubricants as soon as
    ambient conditions permit. Do not use multigrade or SAE 30 grade lubricants in
    two-stroke cycle marine engines or Series 149 under any circumstances.
    5. At lower ambient temperatures where sufficient starter cranking speed may not be
    achieved to start the engine with SAE 50 grade oils, SAE grade 40 oils may be used. SAE
    50 grade oils are not recommended below 45 F (7 C) ambient.

    https://www.demanddetroit.com/public/technicianguides/technav.asp/

    See #4. It is recommended you run straight 40 weight in a 2 stroke almost always, unless in weather that gets below 32F (without starting aids: block heater etc.) . But, Detroit Diesel does sell a CF2 rated 15w-40, I forgot the part number for it and it's murder to try to find the part number online. But for cold weather, they do allow use of a 15w-40.

    Rcrapps- you beat me to it, but on your chart for marine, under secondary oil #4 is listed, but see figure 2-2 and number 4.
  7. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    32F is not the norm around here or Panama City Florida.
    Neither is running 15w40 in a 2 stroke.
  8. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    No and No, but it can get down to below 32F in Panama City. I'd talk to the local dealer as I've seen them recommend it in winter regions where ambient temp is regularly below 60F and the motors didn't have block heaters. Personally I'd use 40W, but don't necessarily feel that 15w-40 is the end of the world to use in a 2 stroke in Panama City in the winter, if it's rated properly. I can tell you that trying to get a 12v71 to light off with 40W oil when it's 50F is a real mother. If the motors don't have block heaters, I'd be inclined to wait until March to change it to 40W.
  9. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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    Considering the lowest water temperature in PC is around 60*F in the dead of winter it is unlikely that the engine or engineroom temperature will be in the 30's.

    DD has its reasons to make the use of multi-grade lube an exception, not the rule. The propulsion world is full of short term special condition exceptions to manufacturer's recommended fuels, lubes, and operating conditions. You can pour cod liver oil or baby oil in the engine and run it for a while, any oil will work for a short period but that doesn't mean it's a good practice.
  10. g collis

    g collis Member

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    Well, I solved the whole issue. Went over to DD in Panama City and ponied up $500 plus for their 40Wt and filters. Changed it all out. Now I feel better.
  11. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    If that was 15w40 in the engines, do not be alarmed when you see a total different oil pressure profile during your ships operation.
    Your next oil change may be different again. After that, get use to what oil pressures you see during your fast/slow, hot/cold operations and use them as your operating profiles.
  12. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Marmot again has a good comment about our operating areas and temperatures. Buy the time you make Charleston, you will be back in the same environment as P C. Stay on plan. Block or E R heaters can help if you have any cold (COLD) weather starting issues.
  13. g collis

    g collis Member

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    That is exactly what happened. When I cranked hem up oil pressures were all over the gauges, settling at 30psi at idle and cold. Before the oil change they were around 50-60 psi cold and holding 40-45 psi once at temperature. We took the boat out that day and pressures went to normal later appox 20 minutes of low rpm running. Cranked yesterday and both were normal 50-60lbs idling and cold.
    Today I will adjust the tensioning spring for the governor's. Had DD tune up both engines while on the hard and part of that process resets hat spring to a looser setting. Hence, throttle will not hold speed always want to return to idle. Talked with Rick at Glendenning. He sent me the instructions on how to readjust the tension spring. Seems straight forward enough. He even said to just call him back if I have any problem or concerns with tightening the spring. Very helpful people a Glendenning.
  14. g collis

    g collis Member

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    Block heaters are inop. But she doesn't seem to mind and they light off pretty quick. Kills every bug within 500 feet for about 15 seconds though. Until I get the block heater replaced I'm placing two ceramic space heaters down there. They will keep it comfortable for the old ladies to start up while cold.
    Pretty sure I know the answer to this. But......will I have to drain the coolant down to install new block heaters?

    Thanks, Gary
  15. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    NO

    My Kim heaters install at the coolant elbow above the oil cooler. The thermostat on the far head water rail.
    Every few years one of mine fail, usually the stb for some unknown reason.

    I doubt I loose 1/2 cup of coolant.

    Do not drain. Do not loosen the expansion tank cap (radiator cap).
    If the new heater does not already have some dope on the threads, apply some now.
    Remove old heater with wrench or deep socket. Don't hurry or race, not much water comes out.
    Don't dally either.
    Install new heater, snug down.
    Let the dope seal the thread and not over torque the heater in. You will probably replace it in the future again.

    Do not apply electricity to the heater in at this time. There is probably a little air around the heater element that must be removed by running the motor first.
  16. JimmyL

    JimmyL Member

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    Thanks to rcrapps for the below chart..
    Not wanting to take away from the topic too far but does anyone have something similar to the below for an Ocean Alexander 440 CPMY? Dry, it should be about 27,000 lbs and has a 300 Gallon fuel tank running twin Cat 3208's.
    I'm new to this boat and gathering info so any help is greatly appreciated.
    Bert Fuel 001a.JPG
  17. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Most of the 12v71 TI's I've run, will have an idle oil pressure of less than 12 lbs, one would be around 4-5 lbs at idle with hot oil. 1900 rpms would generally net somewhere around 35-50 psi depending on how worn they were.
  18. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Make one yourself. Get a propellor curve chart from CAT for your HP, and read the fuel numbers at a given RPM off the propellor curve chart (provided your RPMs reach WOT), you're fuel burn will be within less than 5% of whatever the chart reads, record your speed at each given RPM. Wait about 2 minutes after bringing it up to each RPM point for speed to settle out.
  19. g collis

    g collis Member

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    Ran her on Friday for four hours at 1800 rpm. Smooth as silk. All went well. Love this forum.
  20. Bamboo

    Bamboo Senior Member

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    Quite the encouraging comment; frankly I post in hopes that others will feel this way and I read so that I might learn something new. Cheers.