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Need Info on early 1980s 72' raised pilothouse

Discussion in 'Broward Yacht' started by WA2DDL, May 22, 2019.

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  1. WA2DDL

    WA2DDL New Member

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    Thinking of buying a 1981 72ft. RPH and one thing I am having a problem with is the fuel capacity that is reported on it (I searched the threads and found nothing for these specifics of year and length). I know many brokers just want to get something "out" to the public, so numbers are fudged and mistaken in haste. Things like length have been called into question, like this one...is it 72 LWL or LOA...probably LWL, but no stipulation in the specs.

    Still with me? ...Good. So. the listing I have shows only about 2300-2500 gallons total (depending on which ad you read). I find this a bit hard to accept when other Browards of same timeframe list 3500+. So, what is it for this boat? 2500 is "ok" but a bit low if you ask me, and although I sure wont run around with full tanks all the time, I'd like to know I can have a safe margin of fuel remaining when entering the harbor in Bermuda or Panama, etc. Heck, I'm not sure if 2500 gallons is even accurate...hope it's more. Let me know if you have owned or Captained on one.

    ANY other info on this boat would be great. Anything on quirks, idiosyncrasies, entry into waves vs. Hatt/Burger, handling in foul weather...Big question is, if you owned a Broward, would you buy another?

    Will probably be purchasing that or a Hatt this summer if the job offer gels.

    Thanks in advance
  2. chesapeake46

    chesapeake46 Senior Member

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  3. WA2DDL

    WA2DDL New Member

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    Thanks, I'll check that out right away
  4. WA2DDL

    WA2DDL New Member

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    I gave them a call and they were unable to help but gave me the name of a naval architect who used to work for them, although not during the time that particular boat was built. We have a loose appointment give each other a call in the next couple of days to talk. Thanks again for the direction but you got me started in, I'll let you know if it turned into anything. By the way this guy seems to have some spreadsheets mainly on the Florida boats not the Michigan built Browards. Again I'll let you know what I found out... Thanks
  5. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    2500 gallons is a bit low for a 72' MY? Are you crazy? That's a ton of fuel for a 72' MY.
  6. WA2DDL

    WA2DDL New Member

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    No, don't think I'm crazy but I might be...I mean, I am thinking of buying a boat; what does that tell ya?

    Now, on to the fuel... I realize 2500 gallons is a healthy amount but in comparison to other Browards of that era, it's significantly less and I am just wondering why, that's all.

    Several others have around 3500 gallons, with one built in 1976 that has 4500 gallons of fuel capacity on it. Yes 2500 is a significant amount, just wondering if it was an accurate figure and if so, why is it so far under all the other Broward fuel capacities I have seen?
    Last edited: May 24, 2019
  7. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    It's been decades since I've run a Broward. BUT, the ones I ran. A 98' and a 103'. Those were both larger held around 3500 and 4500 gallons if memory serves me right. BUT, most of the ones you see with big fuel capacities had cockpit extensions and needed the large fuel tank in the cockpit (had to be used last) for ballast and so the trim was correct after adding the extension.
  8. WA2DDL

    WA2DDL New Member

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    Thanks for the info on that. I could understand that the larger ones would obviously need a little more fuel in them and the ballast reasoning is one I have heard before as well for extended hulls.

    A good example of what I'm talking about is a boat that still might be for sale out in Key West. I'm recalling from memory so the numbers might be off a little bit but they're pretty close... It is a 75-foot Broward named "Brat". This boat has a 4500 gallon capacity if memory serves me correctly. And I don't believe it has been extended.

    I really don't want to make a big thing about this, in fact the numbers on the boat I am looking at purchasing might be incorrect to begin with and may actually be much more then published. We all know that happens as Brokers hustle to try to get spec sheets out into the public, many times numbers are mistakenly printed out. So, a 3500 gallon fuel capacity may have incorrectly been entered as 2,500 gal by some secretary who misread the number sheet she was given.

    Ideally, I would love a 3500 gallon capacity. Again, not that I would keep full tanks, it costs fuel to tanker fuel, we all know that. But on longer trips it's nice to not have to be constantly computing fuel burn because you are cutting it so close. I think we all understand that.

    Thanks again for the info on that, I will look to see if some of those vessels may have been extended.
  9. WA2DDL

    WA2DDL New Member

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    Oh, one more thing... You might be thinking, "well why not just ask the owner?"

    Simple, he passed away. His son is selling the boat to me on a private sale but knows nothing about the boat itself. No spec sheets exist, no information or records exist, and because of the fire at Broward back around 1996 or so, there's no history to be able to draw from. Aside from just filling the tanks up one day from empty to see what they would hold, I think this might be a less expensive method.
  10. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    On every Broward I have been on, the fuel capacity of each tank is usually listed on a placard in the engine room, usually on the forward bulkhead. If you look at the boat, it will probably be there.
  11. WA2DDL

    WA2DDL New Member

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    Now that is information I could use! The boat is undergoing some extensive work right now, I'll take a look as soon as the engine room is finished.
    That is perfect... Thanks again