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Navel Academy Patrol Boat for sale

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by Bishop6042, Aug 24, 2014.

  1. Bishop6042

    Bishop6042 New Member

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    Anyone seen this or have more information on it?
  2. Old Phart

    Old Phart Senior Member

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    I dunno
  3. Bishop6042

    Bishop6042 New Member

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    Thanks. I was on the phone. I guess I messed up the link.
  4. 993RSR

    993RSR New Member

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    annapolis/ft lauderdale
    You need 2 officers and 4 enlisted before you leave the dock. Oh yea and $150,000. for the refit.
    12V71N 28GPH at 10 knots. Pretty sweet for that old girl.

    YARD PATROL CRAFT - YP

    Description
    Yard Patrol craft are used for training and for research purposes.

    Background
    The YPs are used to teach familiarization with water craft, Basic Damage Control and underway instruction of Basic to Advanced Seamanship and Navigation. Yard Patrol craft provide realistic, at-sea training in navigation and seamanship for midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., and candidates at Officer Candidate School, Pensacola, Fla. These craft can cruise for 1800 nautical miles at 12 knots for five days without refueling.

    The YPs are used at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Keyport, Wash., to measure mobile underwater target and torpedo radiated noise plus ambient water noise conditions; serve as a platform for deployment of suspended, stationary, in-water acoustic targets during on-range torpedo proof and test operations; deployment of countermeasure emulator during torpedo operations; and deployment of oceanographic measurement instrumentation to determine seawater conductivity and temperature at the depth(s) of interest.

    The new Training Patrol Craft (YP) are designated the YP 703 class. The general craft characteristics of the YP 703 class emphasize habitability, training areas, hull structure, integrated bridge, maneuverability, propulsion plant configuration, and, for training purposes only, simulated Underway Replenishment. The main and auxiliary systems and electronics are state-of-the art, Commercial-Off-The-Shelf equipment. Design, construction, and selection of systems, sub-systems, and equipment along with associated software are consistent with reduced Total Ownership Cost and shall facilitate system maintenance and periodic upgrades.

    The primary mission of the Training Patrol Craft (YP) is to provide the midshipmen professional training course with practical training afloat on a robust platform to conduct professional development in a safe shipboard environment equipped with systems essential to modern seamanship and navigation. Such training is designed to develop within midshipmen the abilities of an Officer-of the Deck, a proficiency in navigation, and a working knowledge of afloat operations.

    Point Of Contact
    Office of Corporate Communication (SEA 00D)
    Naval Sea Systems Command
    Washington, D.C. 20376

    General Characteristics, YP 676 class
    Primary Function: Training.
    Builder: Peterson Builders (YP 676 through 701)
    Marinette Marine (YP 683 through 700)
    Differences between the YP 676 class and the YP 696 class are only minor configuration changes.
    Propulsion: 12V-71N Detroit diesel engines, 2 propellers, horsepower rating 437 shaft horsepower @ 2,100 RPM.
    Length: Overall: 108 feet (32.9 meters); Waterline Length: 102 feet (31.1 meters).
    Beam: 24 feet (7.3 meters).
    Draft: 8 feet (1.9 meters).
    Speed: 12 knots (19.6 km/hr).
    Range: 1800 nautical miles (3300 km).
    Hull Material: Wood hull, aluminum superstructure.
    Crew: Officers: 2 Enlisted: 4; Safe Capacity: 50 people.
    Ships:
    (YP 676-677, 680-692), United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (USNA)
    (YP 694), United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (USNA)
    (YP 695), United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (USNA)
    (YP 697), Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Keyport, WA
    (YP 700), United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (USNA)
    (YP 701), Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Keyport, WA
  5. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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    Is that the one they ran aground near Kings Point a couple of years ago?
  6. Savasa

    Savasa Senior Member

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    I heard or read somewhere that it sank and was re-floated in Norfolk, VA I think. If that is the case, a re-fit would probably cost as much or more than it would ever be worth.
  7. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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    I finally read the thread title ... isn't that the nickname for the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center?
  8. Savasa

    Savasa Senior Member

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    Marmot. Tsk, tsk.
  9. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I'm pretty sure that boat has been anchored in Great Bridge, VA near/across from Atlantic Yacht Basin for several years now. Never saw any activity on it.
  10. Opcn

    Opcn Senior Member

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    It was a training boat. Even if it didn't run aground you can bet it ran into some pilings really hard. There is nothing special about Alaskan cedar that would make it more rot resistant. 30 years in salt water in not terrible for ceder, but 30 years of mistreatment at the hands of new sailors probably didn't do it any favors.
  11. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    I can sense some warm evenings around a fire made of this boat as the most sensible way forward but will probably be proved to be premature in this by some illusionist with arms long enough to reach the bottom of his pockets for a while at least.
  12. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    What I cannot understand is, why is it a wood hull and aluminum superstructure, it would make a lot more sense if it was the other way around..........Kiwi just think of all of the smores you could make with all of that cedar!....... This boat has sat idle, anchored in front of Atlantic Yacht Basin deteriorating for at least 10 years......
  13. Opcn

    Opcn Senior Member

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    The superstructure is smaller than the hull. It's easier to fabricate the sharp corners and corridors of a superstructure in aluminum than it is in wood (a welded corner is much stronger than two boards meeting at an angle). The aluminum superstructure is more similar to a ship that they might work on as officers. A wooden hull can take more hits without deteriorating than an aluminum hull suffering from work hardening.
  14. Old Phart

    Old Phart Senior Member

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    How were PT boats constructed?
  15. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    All wood (plywood), both hull and superstructure. They did build 1 PT boat totally out of Aluminum. BUT, PT boats weren't built to last. They were built to be light, fast, and disposible. Which they did with most of them. They ran them up on the beach in the Phillipines and burned lots of them or donated them to the Phillipines.

    As for taking a lot of hits. They build oil rig crew boats out of aluminum and slam them into seawalls and oil rigs, day in and day out and they seem to last just fine. I just ran one from MS to Ft. Laud that was 77' and a 1981. The aluminum was actually in REALLY good shape. I think it was preserved from all of the oil washing around in the bilge from the 12v71 TI's.
  16. NEO56

    NEO56 Member

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    Hey Marmot, do you know the University of Florida cheer?

    "Alligator, Alligator, Alligator, Gar, We ain't as dumb as you think we is":D
  17. Opcn

    Opcn Senior Member

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    Aluminum can be built to a spec that can handle work hardening and not break apart, but that's a heavier more expensive hull than a wood one. It's also more capable of taking the really big hits than a wood hull. Wood, if not allowed to rot, is really good at taking little knocks and bumps. There are trees that have been standing with dead wood cores for literally thousands of years, and every gust of wind is a stress. Another point in favor of a wood hulled training craft is that the aluminum boat that could stand up to decades of abuse (or steel boat) would also be a battleship that could do some real harm to the other vessels. While wood can take decades of hitting the pier a little too hard if you T-bone the destroyer all that wood prematurely ends up in K1W1's fire pit.
  18. NEO56

    NEO56 Member

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    Captain J, Didn't PT boats have those big Merlins in them? I'm still amazed that they didn't fall through the bottom of the boat, or twist the transom off. I wonder what the stringers were made of?
  19. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I have seen this boat firsthand 5 years ago maybe less, and it belongs in a fire pit. It has been in derelict condition for a long time. The sales price should be an indication of that.
  20. Opcn

    Opcn Senior Member

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    The broker who bought it swept out the dirt, threw on a new coat of pain, doubled the price, and hired a SEO firm to get the word out. Someone might make the mistake of believing that a new coat of paint adds value rather than covering up what's wrong.

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