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luxury motor catamarans in excess of 20m

Discussion in 'General Catamaran Discussion' started by vacationboat, Aug 14, 2006.

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  1. vacationboat

    vacationboat New Member

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  2. KCook

    KCook Senior Member

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    Interesting projects. Looked through much of their web site and could not find anything on how long they have been in business???

    Kelly Cook
  3. Innomare

    Innomare Senior Member

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    In their newsletter, it is mentioned they were established in 2003.

    They own a production yard in Marocco, which is quite unique. Their engineering and design office is in France (Cannes).

    Bruno
  4. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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  5. TRY

    TRY Senior Member

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    All above 20 meters

    A total satisfaction to the initial request of information about powercats of more than 20 meters, here's the TRY family of powercats - designed by Master Lars Modin, respectively 30-40-50 meters.

    Attached Files:

  6. KCook

    KCook Senior Member

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    Interesting treatment for a cat. The side profiles give no hint that these are cats.

    Kelly
  7. TRY

    TRY Senior Member

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    About time!

    Till now most of the known powercats looked like modified sailing cats or like floating caravans.
    Since aesthetics are a determining factor when it comes to choosing a boat (yacht) cats can only break through if they LOOK like a yacht, which Lars achieved perfectly with these designs.
  8. Francois

    Francois New Member

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    Try,those three examples are really awesome.Nice design Lars.Their is something about it as Kelly said that make them look diferent from the side.

    Its also the symetry of windows and more.Wow I like the 130 ft :cool: .Is it for steel/alluminium or composite construction ?

    I have seen some power cats that look more like a humpback whales ;) in my lifetime of working on yachts and man they are slugish at sea,heavy on the stern.

    I need to spread the word around here for those nice cool designs.

    Francois
  9. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    Agreed, Cats have potential (alot when you think about it). They give times better ride than a monohull. I often wonder why they are not many megayachts in the form of cats other than m/y Spirit and m/y White Rabbit. They also tend to have the potential of being more spacious than a mono hull.. Stabilty is there also. With all these pros why people do not commision more cats? Afraid of change peoples? Cha!
  10. Barney

    Barney New Member

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    Yeah White Rabbit is the only big one I know that springs to mind. The biggest problem with them is the cramped engine rooms are a pain in the arse to work in. I think there is potential but when you look at the cats that are out there compared to the "traditional" yacht they just dont have the same appeal to most people.
  11. KCook

    KCook Senior Member

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    Yes, but it may be empty space, so to speak. Size for size, a monohull will carry a greater load than a multihull. Then there is the issue of finding a berth for the yacht that can accommodate the extra beam. As a practical matter a cat design, with the same capabilities, will just be a lot more costly than a monohull. Of course in the yachting realm cost is often not a priority. So I do agree, that it's odd there aren't more multihull yachts. Luv White Rabbit.

    Kelly
  12. TRY

    TRY Senior Member

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    There's more of them at every show!

    Last Friday, on the first day of the Paris Boat Show, I did a quick round-up of large(r) catamarans, as per definition of this thread, over 20 meters.
    Not too much of a surprise, there's more of these at every show.

    The same will happen as in open ocean racing, today you can't win on a monohull!
    Tomorrow cats will be the hot thing to have!

    A non-exhaustive list of (both sailing) and power catamaran yachts over 2OM:

    Sailing cats first (this is not too much a sailing forum but one has to be catamaran-ly correct!):
    Switch 77' (F)
    Alliaura Marine 74'5 (F)
    Blubay 92' till 130' (F)
    Catana 28M (F)
    Celebrity 72' (Thailand & China)
    CIM Shipyard 72' till 116' (F)
    Multiplast Exclusive 76' (F)
    Serenity 71' (Thailand)

    Power catamarans:
    Blubay 82' (F)
    Ocean Vision 22-27-32M (F)
    African Cats 64' (South Africa)
    CIM Shipyard 130' charter cat (F)
    Santorini 20M (F)
    Galileo 75'-75' (Morocco)
    KKG 20M (Austria)

    These lists are probably far from complete, so please feel welcome to add the ones I missed!
  13. MaxResolution

    MaxResolution Senior Member

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    I just spent an hour trying to get the jist of all the technical pros-and-cons of motorsailers, particularly 'cruising cats.' Below is a quote I found particularly appropriate, the author's theme is 'real world' performance, and ultimately 'survival'...

    Suitable cruising boat
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    There is a real difference in the type of boat one needs for coastal cruising and that for ocean crossing. With modern weather forcasting, the danger for coastal boats is grounding and collision, not big seas. However, when you cross oceans you still have these two at each end of the passage, and weather forecasting only goes so far. You just might just get caught in something nasty. Its then that the large volume, mass-produced boat might let you down, although proper tactics should still get you through most things. I do want a boat that will look after me if I get it wrong. I believe my catamaran (a Manta 42 Mk II) meets that requirement for me and my wife and children who cruise with me. We have just crossed the Caribbean and the Pacific, and on the former experienced very rough, but not dangerous, weather. Still, a monohull near us was hanging to a sea anchor whilst we thought it was quite enjoyable, so I trust my boat. I will never go out on a big ocean in any Hunter or Bavaria, although I might in a larger Beneteau. The fact that they do get away with it, and have a European RCD rating of category A is not enough. The ocean is often difficult and uncomfortable, but surprisingly rarely does it become truly dangerous. Friends have just completed a 12 year (really!) circumnavigation, and never saw more than 35 knots of wind. Several yachts were lost during this year's crossing of the Pacific, but as far as I know, none to severe weather, so an unseaworthy vessel is more likely not to be tested. However, last year several were lost North of New Zealand. This proves that occasionally yachts do have to face awful conditions. Then their stability and strength will be put to the test. Cruising World and other magazines are happy, indeed honoured, to publish material by leading authors and seamen, but they ignore what those experts say when doing their boat reviews. We can all understand the advertising pressures, but they should be more blunt about righting moments, ballast design etc. Instead they enjoy a sail up Chesapeake Bay appreciating the responsiveness and performance of a lightweight stiff hull, and forget to mention that that same vessel will be unmanageable in a heavy sea and will capsize if a small breaking wave hits it on the beam, whereafter it may take an age to re-right itself and will certainly emerge minus its rig. Buyers are besotted with interior volume, island berths and form stiffness. Well fine, but keep it on the coast, or get a catamaran!
    __________________
    Arni
    Catamaran 'Jade'
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