Click for Lurssen Click for Ocean Alexander Click for JetForums Click for Fendertex Click for Mag Bay

Long-Range Trawler / Explorer Yacht Brands

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by ThirdStew, Mar 17, 2020.

  1. gr8trn

    gr8trn Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    280
    Location:
    Portland, OR
  2. mapism

    mapism Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    584
    Location:
    Sardinia
    Thanks for your thoughts, I appreciate.
    I can't complain actually, because while I am obviously subject to the countrywide movement restrictions, I am onboard a beautiful Canados of a friend of mine in Sardinia, which is also one of the least affected areas. So far at least, fingers crossed!
    I do have many friends in N Italy though, and a couple of them have been infected.
    Nasty situation indeed, in general.
    But I'm confident that we are doing whatever it takes, and we will eventually get out of this sh!t, hopefully even stronger.
    All the best for your project, and feel free to PM me for anything IT-related.
  3. Fishtigua

    Fishtigua Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Messages:
    2,695
    Location:
    Guernsey/Antigua
    Haha. I once ran a boat built in Argentina. The electrics were a bloody nightmare. the system was 12, 24, 36, 110, 220v all mixed together. Stupid!
  4. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    12,741
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    This wouldn't be from a brand that liked to use 12-14 fuel tanks all linked together to make 2 or 3 tanks would it? LOLOLOL
  5. ThirdStew

    ThirdStew New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2020
    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    New York
    What's wrong with that?


    /sarcasm
  6. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2019
    Messages:
    695
    Location:
    Ft Lauderdale
    I've actually daydreamed about Kohala, an 85 Burger born I think as a 72. Cockpit added speed, economy, and doubled range. So even if you won't ever fish, and why wouldn't you, the boat on paper just seems like a terrific foundation for extensive cruising. I'm not in the market and love my own evolving Burger, but I like the concept...
  7. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    12,741
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    They were all aluminum tanks, in between stringers, connected with rubber hose...….and had to wait for them all to equalize etc.....not everything would drain out of them to transfer.....to totally drain the bow you had to be on plane......to totally drain the aft you'd aft to be at hull speed or slower.......so on a 100-105' yacht, you'd have 6 different small aluminum fuel tanks all connected together to make 1 tank, with holes in the stringers for the top and bottom hoses.....could access some tanks, not access others......it was a F'ing MESS of a design. As was the electrical and everything else about the boat......the engine room was laid out pretty well though.
  8. ThirdStew

    ThirdStew New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2020
    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    New York
    Engineering at its finest!
  9. TimL

    TimL New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Puget Sound
    I would love a trawler - one of my favorite designs was by Dick Boon/Vripack - Doggersbank 84 (they have designed longer and shorter models also). I would have Vripack do the design architecture and have Mulder or Van der Valk build it. Both good yards and Vripack is well known. If you want to stick to American - Burger is a good yard and I love their older designs from the 1960-80s. I envy your position. Good Luck.
  10. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    9,868
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Although most of the boats I see mentioned here are beautiful a lot are designed more for shall we say a sedate style of cruising. When you're taking about world cruising you need to be ready for whatever you might hit. That leads me to yards with a commercial lineage. One of my all time favorite yachts was Zopilote from Delta. (Picture was borrowed from a previous thread.)
    [​IMG]
  11. mapism

    mapism Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    584
    Location:
    Sardinia
    +1, and not only for Zopilote (now called Holiday, as I recall).

    Here's another couple of almost sisterships, as spotted by truly yours.
    The first in Marina Bay (FLL) about 10 years ago, and the second 5 years ago - no need to mention where, as pretty easy to recognize! :)

    That said, even if Delta Marine and a few others indeed build some battleship-like plastic boats, a double bottom steel hull is what I'd rather have for cruising the seven seas, if given the choice.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  12. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    9,868
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Depends where plans are to cruise. Steel burns a lot of fuel.
  13. mapism

    mapism Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    584
    Location:
    Sardinia
    In that respect, the Dashew's FPBs are even better.
    Different strokes for different folks, as always with boats....
  14. JWY

    JWY Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2004
    Messages:
    1,247
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    Delta unquestionably builds a good boat. Nice to see the pics of Oasis. But I never understood after the sinking of Zop I after hitting an uncharted rock, how BK could build another fiberglass boat.

    NY Cap: please clarify what you mean with "steel burns a lot of fuel." What are you basing it on? What are you comparing it to? How much is "a lot?"
  15. mapism

    mapism Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    584
    Location:
    Sardinia
    Far from pretending to answer on behalf of NY Cap, but my understanding of what he meant is simply more weight=more fuel.
    Which is somewhat true of course, but the way I see it, neither fiberglass nor aluminum (as in FPBs) are the right way to save fuel.
    Sailboats are more like it! :)
  16. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2019
    Messages:
    695
    Location:
    Ft Lauderdale
    I drove right past that. Had steel boats. They never sipped an ounce of fuel. Engines, on the other hand....but they don't care what they're bolted to in performing that feat.
  17. mapism

    mapism Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    584
    Location:
    Sardinia
    Funny you should mention her, J.
    Not sure if you remember, but during my stay in another boat (the MS75 which I think you know) from which I took that photo, we met for lunch in the marina restaurant!
  18. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    9,868
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Weight.
  19. JWY

    JWY Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2004
    Messages:
    1,247
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    Of course I remember! A special day. But c'mon, how is looking at yachts in FLL and waterside lunching not a memorable day - regardless of how many times over and over. Never get tired of it! But yes, some days are more special ;-)
  20. JWY

    JWY Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2004
    Messages:
    1,247
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    So for example, a Cape Horn 63 weighs about a hundred tons and burns 8gph and has a range of approximately 5,000nm with its single Volvo. I can give dozens more examples. Is this what you consider "burns a lot of fuel?" Is whatever fuel economy you're looking for worth giving up the benefits of steel?