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Live aboard powerboat?

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by newtoarea94133, Aug 24, 2013.

  1. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Made a mistake on that link, here is the one in San Diego:

    1989 Pilgrim North Castle Marine Pilgrim 40 Power Boat For Sale -

    It sounds to me as though his primary mission is live aboard, and take the boat out for a few hours with friends every once in awhile. This vessel would accomplish that in fine fashion,...even with the addition of a girlfriend/wife.

    BTW, you might have a look thru this rather witty book about a Canadian couple who kind of backed into buying their first 'big' boat, and the learning processes they experienced:

    Seven Miles an Hour: Retiring on a Trawler, With Cats
    Seven Miles an Hour: Retiring on a Trawler, With Cats: Don Wallace: 9780972750165: Amazon.com: Books
  2. newtoarea94133

    newtoarea94133 New Member

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    That is the place I contacted for lessons. I guess you get a certificate after you complete it which will lower your insurance rates on the boat. I cant charter a boat with them until I take the course. Course is about $1000 so at this point Im trying to find a boat to sleep on for the weekend before I go further. I feel like thats a good first step. The idea of living on the water on a boat sounds amazing. But if I cant sleep on the boat because Im wondering if I drifting out to sea then whats the point haha. I know Im being extreme but I really am jsut wanting to make sure I feel comfortable sleeping on the water in a boat, seems like a good idea.
  3. newtoarea94133

    newtoarea94133 New Member

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    And Ive found a full time live aboard here with. Its a 1 year waiting list. Which is perfect because Im still in a lease and need time to research.
  4. newtoarea94133

    newtoarea94133 New Member

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    Thats an interesting boat, thank you for the link. But Im more leaning towards something like the link I posted. Id love to find something more modern with a nice inside living area with some kinda area to entertain on deck. I am interested in costal cruising also. That Sea Ray I posted seems like great but doesnt have anything really for entertaining on deck really.
  5. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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  6. newtoarea94133

    newtoarea94133 New Member

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    Thanks, I have to find something thats at a slip already. I dont want to take it out on the water. If I could find a boat thats docked and stay for a weekend that would be great. Im right at Fishermans Wharf so anything around the area even if I have to take a ferry to the other side of the bay.
  7. newtoarea94133

    newtoarea94133 New Member

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    I just seen thats at $800 a day. Is that what I should expect to pay to sleep on a boat for a weekend? This is discouraging haha
  8. MysticDolphin

    MysticDolphin Member

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    there are alot of marinas in SF bay..Sausolito has a huge water community... and many without waiting list.. owning a Carver.. after a long look at boats and for my needs the 4207 aft was the best boat for my needs and wallet.. there is alot of cabin space and huge state rooms for a boat.. there are several different models.. i dont have the lower helm or eating area which makes the salon alot bigger...
  9. newtoarea94133

    newtoarea94133 New Member

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    Thank you, I was thinking about Sausolito also. I was hoping to stay on this side of the bay . Working and living in the city is great but if I had to take a ferry over that wouldnt be a deal breaker. Ill check it out. Thx Mystic
  10. Dsybok

    Dsybok New Member

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    I think if the style of the Sea Ray motor yacht you posted is what you are after, you should probably confine your search to post 2000 boats. The style of 80s and 90s boats with very few exceptions is going to look VERY dated if you are in love with the mid 2000s Sea Ray look.

    Some boat builders never changed, like Grand Banks for example, they pretty much look the same as they always did, but most of the mainstream builders had a sea change around the late 90s away from pastel colored floral fabrics and white wood / formica interiors to what you saw in that Sea Ray.

    I still think a mid 2000s Carver would be worth a look. Check out recent vintage Meridians too, they are getting rather nice, remind me a lot of the 2000s Sea Ray Sedan Bridges. If they have any boat shows up by you, that is something to consider, or if you are in Los Angeles regularly, consider the Lido boat show in Newport Beach coming up towards the end of Sept as an opportunity to see a whole lot of boats potentially in your desired demographic in one place at one time.
  11. newtoarea94133

    newtoarea94133 New Member

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    Thanks, I like that boat that I posted, just wish it had more of an area outside than it does to entertain. A boat show is a great idea, Im actually going to LA this weekend. Too bad its at the end of Sept, maybe Ill shoot don again. I feel like Im learning alot and getting more zoned in on the kind of boat I want. Ive found out alot of info about slips here and live a boards. Its been very informative and interesting and Im lookng forward to moving forward on this. Im gonna look more for an individual thats maybe willing to let me have a weekend on the boat at the dock. Whats the difference between a sedan bridge and a flybridge?
  12. Dsybok

    Dsybok New Member

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    I think functionally a sedan bridge and fly bridge are more or less the same. Sedan style boats have a large salon/main deck area which may or may not have a helm station, a flybridge might only have the helm on the upper deck and no helm station on the lower deck, and a sedan bridge may have helm stations on both decks or only the upper depending on the builder. Sea Ray happened to call their mid 2000s Sedan Bridges.

    I wouldn't get too hung up on the terminology, you will also run into "convertibles" "opens" etc. There are endless terms for these things. Focus on whether the layout works for you
  13. Caltexflanc

    Caltexflanc Senior Member

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    Yes there are, but finding one that accepts full time live aboards, especially those who do not have another address is the issue. Many people pursue this because of the extremely high housing costs in the Bay Area and get very frustrated. I would be sure you read the lease and rules very very carefully before assuming anything.
  14. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    A couple of comments....

    First, I would take advantage of the year to at least do a little coastal cruising. I fell in love with the water years ago, being on it, moving on it, boating. You may find it's the greatest feeling ever or that it just doesn't do that much for you. That can influence your choice of boat greatly.

    Second, I would suggest considering boats with flybridges. This gives you the outdoors space without taking away the inside space. I just did a quick search. I didn't aim it at your area as I was just looking for ideas. I found several 50 foot Carvers with flybridges, 1996-2000, under $200,000. (Also, I would lower my desired purchase price a bit so I knew I could enjoy using it). I found older Sea Ray convertibles. I know you say not your style, but some great Grand Banks in that range. 2000-2001 Sea Ray 45' Express Bridges. Some really nice Ocean Alexander's. Older Hatteras yachts but the way Hatteras often holds up, they can be great buys. Beautiful 2002 Sea Ray 40' Sedan Bridge. 2000 model Sea Ray 420 Aft Cabin.

    Oh and I do love researching boats. I swear my wife and I have researched nearly every brand on the market in making our selections.
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2013
  15. Boatgalz

    Boatgalz New Member

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    Living Aboard in SF Bay Area

    Not sure if you made the move or not yet...

    I am not a full time live aboard since I travel a bit. But I do stay on my boat when I am in the Bay Area and discovered this a couple years ago. Haven't regretted it at all and saved a ton of money. I already owned the boat so it was a no brainer. And, it can be a better experience than renting a generic, overpriced apartment in the Bay Area. Purchasing a boat that has been well maintained will be key to limiting your maintenance expenses. My boat is a Sea Ray 370 Aft Cabin and was very well maintained; so, I haven't had any major issues. It's the perfect size for me; but, I am a fairly petite person. Would recommend a 42'+ boat for anyone more normal sized.

    Also, there are a few marinas where you don't have to wait to liveaboard not too far from SF. Oyster Point in SSF is one option although the wind can be pick up out there. Fisherman's Wharf is rough from what I hear from other liveaboards... the waters rip through there and make it pretty rough. I stayed at South Beach Harbor this weekend and can attest that that area is much worse than where I am (in Half Moon Bay which also allows livaboards without a wait). Had a bunch of folks help me out when I was making my decision and happy to do the same for others. Feel free to e-mail with additional questions.
  16. Belle

    Belle Member

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    Sounds cool, Boatgalz. I see the sign now, "No Tall People Allowed." When I was single I wasn't near the water and didn't know how great it was but I am totally onboard with the live aboard idea now. Affordable way to own a boat. Unfortunately, it's getting a bit harder to do in many places.
  17. martind.

    martind. New Member

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    living aboard

    Take a hard look at a hatteras 43 aft cabin motor yacht, circa 1970-80. These boats are virtually indestructable, have about 600+ sq. ft living space (2 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room, kitchen) 6ft 3" headroom, usually come with Detroit Diesel engines, and are very easy to maintain. The back deck is in the 150 sq. ft. range. You can pick up a good one: cosmetics done, engines rebuilt, $1000's of upgrades, for around $100K.
  18. NEO56

    NEO56 Member

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    I'm sorry but this is a total crock! As for not leaving the dock will cut down on maintenance costs is completely not true! Belts, fittings, seals, Engine parts, shaft seals, stuffing boxes, all need to be lubricated, including transmissions. Buying a boat to live aboard and not use her is a fatal mistake! If that's the case, just stay where you are and donate all your money to charity. Boats REQUIRE to be taken out, and put through their paces in order to keep all lubricants, engine, transmissions, power steering, and any hydraulics on board in working order.

    And as for the new guy in San Francisco, do not factor in a mortgage payment into the equation! Take a deep breath, and start stashing your money until you can pay cash for the boat. And preferably buy a new boat. That way you have warranties on your side, and you've given yourself two or three years of no costs, except for oil changes and other "must do" items. I have been pondering the same thing for years. But I'm going a different route. I'm having a 105 built (actually a 95 with a 10' cockpit.) Buying a used boat, without being a certified mechanic, is asking for bills that would choke a horse! My boat is not only going to be my home, but an entertainment platform, for our Clients, and Investor's. O.K I'm off my soapbox for now, but don't take Dsybok's opinions as gospel...it just ain't so.
  19. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Welcome to YF NEO56.

    You're absolutely on target that boats need to be run. They sit, they rot; not to mention what grows on the bottom. But I have to disagree with your view on new vs pre-owned. I would always recommend against buying new from a financial standpoint. The only reasons for going new is if you're one of those people who needs new everything or financing. The resale value you'll lose in the first 3-5 years should be way more than you'd spend on what might otherwise be covered repairs under a warranty. Add to that the "new boat bugs". Even if they're covered under a warranty you'll lay out thousands just bringing the boat into the authorized yard. Once a boat is out of warranty you can bring the it to the mechanics, etc. of your choice. I had one client who traveled his boat 60+ miles maybe a dozen times the first 3 years going to the authorized yard, and the boat was laid up for most of each of those seasons. On top of that the first owner pays for all the extras from electronics to cutlery. When buying a pre-owned boat you always consider all electronics to be obsolete (you don't consider it in the price), yet you may well get 5 years or more out of it.
  20. SomeTexan

    SomeTexan Member

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    It makes me laugh when people think you can let a boat sit in a slip in the water for 10 years, then it will fire up and work perfectly when they try to sell it. If you want a floating house, buy a barge and build a house on it. If you want to tour the world without leaving your house, buy a yacht/ship/boat.