Click for Lurssen Click for Alexseal Click for JetForums Click for Mag Bay Click for Bering

Kleven 107m Expedition Yacht

Discussion in 'Unique, Custom or New Yachts' started by germanyachting, Aug 21, 2014.

You need to be registered and signed in to view this content.
  1. germanyachting

    germanyachting Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,446
    Location:
    West Coast
    Recently, another site showed the hull and superstructure for this yacht underway in Norway. They also mentioned that she will not have a faired hull. What does this do to the price and construction time of the yacht? Does it significantly reduce them both? In the link below, there is a rendering of this new vessel. It looks like one of their offshore vessels. This must cut costs as well I assume.

    Kleven - To build Expedition Support Vessel
  2. Milow232

    Milow232 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2011
    Messages:
    1,449
    Location:
    Germany
    I can not recall correctly but I think the fairing, painting etc on "Quattroelle" from bare steel took at least 10 months or even more.
    But I do remember a discussion here about a paint job of "A" which can very well take up to 18 months. I guess it also depends on the paint system and if they get it right at the first time. Which seems to be not that easy, it is definitely hard (physical) work.

    But I would also guess that this has got a positive impact on budget and construction time.

    Anyway I leave it to the knowledgeable members here to give a profund and exact answer. Hopefully as I find this interesting as well.
  3. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    I hope their engine fitters have more tools available to them than a big crescent wrench.

    If this photo is supposed to represent the standard of their mechanical work it raises a few questions.

    Attached Files:

  4. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,158
    Location:
    Sweden
    Don't worry, it is a Bacho wrench...
  5. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    Ah so ... does that mean this is a Bacho moon in Swedish? :D

    Attached Files:

    • moon.jpg
      moon.jpg
      File size:
      12 KB
      Views:
      2,227
  6. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    7,390
    Location:
    My Office
    Bacho are probably the best of the adjustable wrenches, if I recall correctly they were the first to have a marked size and the worm turns the opposite way to its competitors.

    That said, in reality Adjustables should be kept under lock and key and only used when nothing else is available not as a convenience tool.
  7. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    Funny you mentioned that ... I was using a large "crescent wrench" to hold a pipe union on a boat a couple of days ago and every time I tried to tighten it the darn thing got looser. It took a moment to realize that the thread was opposite. :eek:

    I didn't notice a name on it but will have a look next time I am on the boat.
  8. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    7,390
    Location:
    My Office
  9. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,158
    Location:
    Sweden
    You are right, it was initially B.A. Hjorth & Co 125 years ago, when they got the rights to produce the patented adjustable wrench from the inventor J.P Johansson.

    So in Sweden we think all the copies are turning the wrong way...
  10. mediterannean

    mediterannean Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    71
    Location:
    europe
    Talking from practice..Depending on the deflection of surfaces and the paint system for fairing/topcoating it takes around +-30 hours per sqm( for a well experienced paint teams, and respecting (!)Paint Specs)

    When talking about vessels above 80-90m then you need a paint applicator that is used to large volume surface applications.
  11. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    Sounds expensive. I have always just used a rattle can or dipped the handle in this stuff:

    Attached Files:

    • DIP.jpg
      DIP.jpg
      File size:
      49.5 KB
      Views:
      2,730
  12. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    9,932
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    Fairing and painting a steel hull adds quite a bit of time and money to the boat.
  13. mediterannean

    mediterannean Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    71
    Location:
    europe
    And aesthetics..which is what Yachting is mostly about!
  14. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    Even when one of the industry leaders fairs and paints, the results are not always what you expect.

    Attached Files:

    • WOW.JPG
      WOW.JPG
      File size:
      74.1 KB
      Views:
      1,332
  15. mediterannean

    mediterannean Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    71
    Location:
    europe
    Yacht Painting deserves time and attention to detail, no rush jobs..
  16. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    9,932
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    But I think an Expedition yacht of the size we're talking about. An unfaired hull fits in. It is an Expedition yacht after all. I see it kind of like putting a flawless paintjob on an army tank......
  17. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    7,390
    Location:
    My Office
    Hi,

    Show me a yard where there is enough of each that produces a perfect job.

    I can PM you my e mail addy if you like as I might no longer be posting here by the time this miracle surfaces.
  18. mediterannean

    mediterannean Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    71
    Location:
    europe
    My comment was in ref to the blue topcoated surface picture, where we can identify some problems such as:framing effect( most probably construction problem -not enough internal framing maybe?, a non-acceptable fairing above the fender bar,( which could have been seen and fixed at least after showcoating)and not correct gloss appearance in overall! Problems that can be avoided if there is a mutual standard expectation set up in the project( applicator, Yard and paint consultant)

    Not enough reason to point only a Yard or applicator of not giving enough time and attention,it is a combination!There are big projects delivered on the very right quality ( much better than what we see in the picture) even if not very perfect. I know projects where there is good motivation from all involved parties , the expected standards clear from the very first date , strict controls during the process and final results really encouraging.


    We should not become boring here on the forums to readers ,by going so deep in technical language. Always welcomed to PM me..
  19. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    I think it is worth becoming "boring" because the photo is of a yacht taken very shortly after delivery from one of the most highly regarded yards in Europe.

    I have my own ideas about how that finish was allowed to see the light of day and few of them are related to paint chemistry or meteorology but my point is the best paint consultant in the world isn't going to the pyramid of issues which lead to what that photo illustrates.

    You wouldn't be a paint consultant by any chance?
  20. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2009
    Messages:
    993
    Location:
    Dana Point, Ca
    The Golden Shadow, built in 1995 by the no longer existing Campbell Shipyards in San Diego was "not faired". The steel workmanship was remarkable for this yard that specialized in building Tuna Seiners (probably the most "fair" commercial vessel types built) and you would not visually see enough "unfairness" to ever register. And yes, she had many complex curves and shape in her beautiful sheer line.

    Was able to board her under construction and she was done absolutely perfect for the intended role of this vessel. My all time favorite expedition/support vessel:

    http://*********************/motor-yacht-2788/golden-shadow.htm

Share This Page