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Info on '68 Roamer

Discussion in 'Chris Craft Roamer Yacht' started by Jim Isbell, Jun 6, 2005.

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  1. Jim Isbell

    Jim Isbell New Member

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    I am tracking down the owner of 46' Aluminum Roamer that I may purchase. It is a 1968. I was told it had a single gas engine, but when I saw the boat it was obviously a twin. I could NOT go aboard so dont know which. The exhausts are only 3" so I am assuming that it is NOT diesel, but that may not be a valid assumption as my last boat had 2" exhaust on a 6-354N Perkins diesel.

    Is there anything I should pay particular attention to during my inspection prior to purchase. Yes, I am having it surveyed by a person very well informed on aluminum hulls (he restores and sells Striker fishing boats)
  2. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Giant Steps

    That last part gave me confidence you'll get an informative survey.
    Roamers that size usually had twin Detroit diesels, but rarely have gas.
    Which one is it?
    Is it on Yachtworld.com or Boat Traderonline.com??
    IN any case, keep us posted - she's a biggie!
    Cheers,
    Eric
  3. Jim Isbell

    Jim Isbell New Member

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    Still looking for the owner

    I have not yet made contact with the owner so dont know what the engines are. I hope they are diesels as that would make it much more desirable to me.

    What kind of fuel consumption could I expect at 7 knots if they were detroits? Were they normaly 6 or 8 cyl?
  4. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Mighty Tidy

    Usually 6V53 (6 cylinder - 53 cubic inch per cylinder) Detroits - but you can always hope it has 8V71s!
    Cruising along a 7 knots (8 = hull displacement speed) is mighty frugal - can't imagine over 12 gph; probably less.
    Cheers!
    Eric
  5. Jim Isbell

    Jim Isbell New Member

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    8V71s vs 6V53s

    Actually I would prefer the 6V53s as I am looking for a river and ICW cruising boat and not a ski boat. I will usualy run at or just below Hull Speed as I would rather enjoy a cruise as long as I can. Its nice to be able to get up on a plane when there is a Huricane chasing you but most of the time I have it on automatic pilot and I am leaning back with a cool drink and a sandwich. I dont want to spill my drink.

    My last boat had a single Perkins 6-354N and at 1350 RPM I could get a cruise of 8 knots at 0.9 GPH for about 10 MPG. I could cover 100 miles a day and thats enough to change the scenery, thats all I want, another island, another anchorage, early enough for a rum punch.

    I may install shaft brakes so I can go single engine occasionaly when I only need steerage way. Its also nice if you have engine trouble and have to shut one down.
  6. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Only The Best

    Sounds like you're a pretty experienced boatsman.
    An aluminum-hulled Roamer is pretty much the best river boat money can buy - tough hull, lighter weight, great looking yacht. Hope you're on to a good one - would love to see what she looks like (name?).
    Cheers!
    Eric
  7. Jim Isbell

    Jim Isbell New Member

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    Experience???

    Not really what you would call well rounded boatsman, just know what I have had and used which is sailboats, not power. I am new to power boats. I decided to "go over to the dark side" just three months ago. Before that I would not have had a "stinkpot". But I am approaching 70 and now is the time to switch before I kill myself by going swimming in a storm while screwing with a stuck foresail.

    I am also new to Aluminum. My last boat was a 44' steel ketch with a 6-354 Perkins diesel for aux. That engine is the full extent of my knowledge of power boats. It was bulletproof and I would love to find a nice Roamer with a pair of perkins in it. Before the steel hull I had fiberglass, wood and composite but never a Fero Cement.

    I am a bit cautious about aluminum because I dont know it. I was looking at a 62 Richardson but I am somewhat afraid of that boat because they went into cahoots with an aircraft company just before producing Aluminum boats and if they used aircraft aluminum the boats will be worthless on salt water,
  8. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Worm Turns

    Richardson yachts have held up pretty well over the (many) years.
    Aluminum is probably the best overall material to build boats out of, but no material is perfect. In the case of salt water, special precautions have to be made (correct "zincing" - epoxy coating the bottom), but nothing that hasnt been done before.
    Dont know iffin you'll find a Perkins powered Roamer, but Detroit Diesels are pretty bullet proof in their natural form (non-turboed), and you can find a DD mechanic in Indonesia.
    Good idea finally giving up on the rag boat, they are great, but tougher and tougher to manage. That and the idea of being turned into a cancerous toast out in the open make stinkpots more and more "likeable" - especially a great looking classic Roamer!
  9. Jim Isbell

    Jim Isbell New Member

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    Yes, if they used the right aluminum. My concern that merging with an aircraft company just as they started making aluminum boats is that they may have made a great fresh water boat, but a poor salt water boat. But so far I have no evidence either way.
  10. wally erickson

    wally erickson New Member

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    If anyone would know about aluminum it would be an aircraft company. I doubt they have much of that light stuff laying about thick enough for a boat hull anyway.
    I hope you take the plunge and get the boat.
    w.
  11. Jim Isbell

    Jim Isbell New Member

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    The concern is not the weight of the aluminum, its the alloy. The aircraft aluminum doesnt have the magnesium content of marine aluminum. The magnesium makes it corrosion resistant.
  12. wally erickson

    wally erickson New Member

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    You don't think they know that?
  13. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    Richardson Phantom Series Cruisers - by Avro

    No, Richardson was a very good builder of well-respected wooden yachts before they ventured into aluminum-hulls. They used all the right grades/types of aluminum in their boats. What was unusual was that they "planked" the hull - just like wooden boats. No unsightly plates for their boats. Still see enough Avro-Richardsons around to make me think they hold up well - no individual guarantees however.

    Attached Files:

  14. alloyed2sea

    alloyed2sea Moderator

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    1962 Richardson MY 43

    Here's a fine old aluminum Richardson ("Apple Pie") I found recently for sale.
    Pictures of the bottom make it look like a winner.
    Did not inspect in person however.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 14, 2005
  15. wally erickson

    wally erickson New Member

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    Is that beautiful or what? That’s a lot of welding! I wonder if they had MIG back then. The labor must have been astronomical, fitting the planks, welding, grinding then the bondo like stuff if they used it. All those Richardsons I have seen through the years have they been AL.? I always thought they were wood. Very Nice.
    W.
  16. Jim Isbell

    Jim Isbell New Member

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    The aluminum Richardsons were all made in their last year before they went down, 1962. Prior to that they were wood. At least that is what I have found in my research.
  17. Jim Isbell

    Jim Isbell New Member

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    I must correct myself. The Aluminum Richardsons starterd production in 62 but went on for at least through 65...maybe longer.
  18. Maurice J

    Maurice J New Member

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    1962 Richardson MY 43

    Just came across your thread about the Avro-Richardson Phantom series. My research indicates that about 150 hulls were made but production was stopped in 1962 and the remaining hulls sold off. The hulls were made in Toronto ON and then sent to the Richardson plant in Tonawanda N.Y. for completion. The hulls are planked and attached to frames and ribs. The seams are sealed with battens (using Thicol) which are bolted with stainless steel nuts and bolts. The 1962 Richardson MY 43 shown on an earlier post is indeed a nice boat as I have had a very close look at her but the engines are suspect and I had to turn it down.
  19. alanagr1

    alanagr1 New Member

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    Gas or ??

    My 48' Roamer which originally came with gas engines Now has newer reman 454 Marine Power motors gives me a burn of 7 gallons per hour at 1900 rpm or appx 8 knots .. I dont think you would do much better the that with diesels ?? She is steel..
  20. Capt Keller

    Capt Keller New Member

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    Just finished up about a 703 mile voyage in my 1970 38' Steel Hulled Roamer with 454 mercruisers. It didnt' matter if we traveled on one engine or both at the same time as long as we made 7.5 kts she made an average 1.25 miles per gallon even though we upped the speed to 8kts half way through the trip. That's as good as any aluminum boat going at cruising speed, though I never understood the hurry to get somewhere. LOL It took us four days, and four nights to make the trip, and it was all in rough choppy water except for the rivers.

    Capt John S. Keller
    Great Lakes Pilot