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Hurricane plan for absentee owner?

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by luvtocruise, Jun 30, 2021.

  1. luvtocruise

    luvtocruise Member

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    Location:
    Texas
    The marina has a hurricane plan, Insurance company has asked for our plan in addition— Does anyone have one they wouldn’t mind sharing with me? Preferably an absentee owner plan, I am working on getting a captain or service to maintain the boat when we are not on it. If not, I bet my plan looks remarkably like the marinas— lol
  2. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    I am always at how people ask questions without bothering giving us information.

    in this case... WHERE THE HELL ARE YOU LOCATED AND WHAT KIND OF BOAT DO YOU HAVE ...

    bottom line there is very little you can tell as it all depends on the specific storm. Back in 2017 for IRMA, I made the call to run to Hatchet bay eleuthera... we were one the few big boat in coconut grove Miami to make it. But it all depends on the storm and which way it a coming from
  3. luvtocruise

    luvtocruise Member

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    Location:
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    Sorry — Westbay Sonship 58 in Riviera Dunes Marina in Palmetto
  4. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    A couple of suggestions or thoughts.

    First, do not commit to anything. Word your hurricane plan as "may" not "will" and list options, but make it clear you may not do any of them. You can't know timing and circumstances.

    Second, every time you leave your boat, leave it fully prepared for a hurricane. Tie it for a hurricane. Remove canvas. Have alarms and pumps and everything set.

    Third, it's best to have an agreement with someone locally who can check on your boat.

    Now, you may have plan A, plan B, plan C and more and they may include moving it but there are far more boats in Florida than will be moved. If you have an agreement with the marina or yard that's great. Just don't risk your life or health or anyone else's.

    You're in a somewhat protected area. Not invincible but if you get 150 mph winds, then all bets off. I know there's a boatyard near but honestly not sure they provide you any more protection than the marina you're in. I don't know how high the posts are in your marina, but hope they're enough to handle most cases of surge.

    Get use to hurricane scares but understand most will not hit you. Find out the history of the specific location, of the marina you're in with storms. Ask how Irma impacted the marina as it was about 35 miles away I believe and winds were only around 100 mph but surge was very high. Do your research for factual information, not fishermen's stories.
    captainwjm and luvtocruise like this.
  5. luvtocruise

    luvtocruise Member

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    Thanks
  6. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    Effect of past storms is good to know but every storm is different. Irma for instance didn’t cause a storm surge on the keys and on west coast of Florida, instead it caused dramatic water level drops never seen before. Many boats were actually resting on the bottom. Here in Miami on the other hand storm surge was massive considering how far the storm passed.

    another issue are feeder bands which can contain very high wind and tornadoes far from the center. That was also the case with Irma. Marinas here had massive damage not consistent with the size and distance of the storm.

    If your marina is reasonably protected from open water and long fetch, the best option is indeed to have someone reliable who will prep the boat. Another important thing besides the height of the pilings is the width of the slip if not a floating dock. Narrow slips make it very difficult to keep the boat off the pilings.
  7. luvtocruise

    luvtocruise Member

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    Ok thanks all — we have a plan to follow to write our new plan — I appreciate all the help
  8. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    His marina is very nice. Reasonably protected. Slips are nice. Floating dock. Hoping I'm not mistaken but from memory and Google.

    Irma was definitely strange and you're right, history didn't warn of water rushing out.

    I think one mistake absentee owners sometimes make is looking ahead and seeing no signs of hurricanes and deciding things like "Oh I'll leave the canvas up" or "I'll leave the chairs out" or "No reason to tie for a hurricane.' If it's hurricane season and you're leaving the boat, leave it fully prepared. You just don't know. I know someone who planned to rush to his boat and had time, but his father was rushed to the hospital the night before we was planning to leave. In his case, he was fortunate as the marina did do the work (substantial cost but he didn't care) plus the storm barely hit them. He only lived 200 miles away, but suddenly his boat was not a priority.