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How to make a cv with no experience?

Discussion in 'Licensing & Education' started by kzpl23, Jul 28, 2015.

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  1. kzpl23

    kzpl23 New Member

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    I just have a quick question what do you guys put on a cv with no yachting experience? I was thinking that maybe I should wait and get some day work in and then make a cv. What is the best way to do this? Thanks.

    Leaving for florida August 5th and would like to get ready as much as possible. I have my ENG 1 set up and already registered for the stcw95 its just after I get that done, whats next? Dock walking, they say to pass out cvs but what should i put on it if i have no yachting experience?

    Thanks everyone!
  2. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Think of it a moment as your advertisement of why to hire you. You have no more than 30 seconds to convince them to talk to you. So include the knowledge and skills you do have and the fact you have completed your stcw 95. Include your accomplishments in other jobs or in school, things that show what kind of a worker you can be. Mention your interest and your ability in learning new things and willingness to do hard and dirty work as well as getting along with co-workers and owners/guests. Hit key words that can show you in a positive light. Include any boating knowledge and experience even if not in a job.
  3. kzpl23

    kzpl23 New Member

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    Ok thank you! I just feel like I have little chance especially when there are other people applying with actual boating/yacht experience. I will give it a try and see how it goes, thanks again.
  4. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    It won't be a walk in the park but by showing that you are wiling to get off your butt and do the ENG 1 medical and the STCW Courses this will show you have some drive.
  5. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Humm
    CV and no experience..
    Our US president did it, So can you. Dream big.
  6. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    That defeatest attitude will reduce your chance from little to none. Try and see how it goes won't get you there. Feeling others will get all the jobs won't. You go out and show people even without experience you will make them excellent crew. You sell yourself and recognize you only need one sale. If 500 say no and one says yes, that's all you need. Everyone in the industry started without experience. I would rather hire as an entry deck hand or stew an enthusiastic person ready to learn things the right way any day than the person who has gone from job to job because they have poor work habits.

    Take any additional courses you can afford to as well to show you went one step beyond. Our younger stews both took extra beyond the basic requirements. Every additional certificate you add shows your commitment.

    Most schools have additional programs. I know one 2 week entry program for those new to the industry and it consists of Introduction to Yachting, Superyacht Crew Watchstanding & Deckhand Course, Tender Operator/RHIB/RYA PBL2, PSSR, First Aid /CPR, Basic Fire Fighting, Personal Survival Techniques, and Maritime Security Awareness. Even just something like First Aid or Tender operator is valuable. Anything that shows you're serious about a career, not just someone looking for a paid vacation.

    Then circulating in the right places where captains and crew might be and I don't mean bars. Marinas or shipyards. Crew houses. A lot of yacht captains really value the opinions of those who run crew houses. Also, other deck hands may be there for a brief time while home and may suddenly become aware their boat lost a deckhand.

    A lot of finding a job is luck. Right place, right time. But luck isn't an accident. We make our own luck by our efforts and by believing. If we've been told "no" 50 times we go to the next believing this is the time for the "yes." We take actions even knowing the potential of them working is low, but it's higher by doing something than nothing. Amazing how many people I've seen get their starts because someone else didn't show up or begged off at the last moment.

    And if you don't have a job, then don't turn jobs down (unless immoral or illegal). Build any resume you can. A captain needs someone to clean the boat, you take that day job and do the best work ever. Someone offers you a one week deck job at a ridiculously low pay, take it and hope for a big tip but at the least you have a resume bullet.
  7. kzpl23

    kzpl23 New Member

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    Well my attitude can be great but if I dont get through the door to have an interview and show the captain that I can be an excellent crew member then... you need to have some luck like you said to even get that chance. I was not trying to have a defeatest attitude I was just being realistic. I dont know how the boating industry works but usually if you have more experience/certifications then you have a higher chance of getting an interview.
  8. Perlmudder

    Perlmudder Member

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    I can tell you when I first started looking for a job in Ft. Lauderdale it was daunting. Many people would dock walk and look for jobs at Waxy's. I never found anything that way. The way I found work was talking to friends, the people you lived with in the crew house, etc. After a bit, eventually all of them would be looking for help with day work. Take the offer every time and soon enough you will have some day work to add to your resume. Eventually the day work adds up into longer periods of day work. I worked on the same boat day working for a month. That way you are at the marina every day, you meet people, talk to other crews.

    Also take every course you can. I did not have a lot of yacht experience, but I had a lot of boat experience and sailing experience, along with lifeguard, swim instruction, upon other first aid trainings. All these will help you.

    In the end I was lucky and ended up working with another guy who eventually moved to Rybovich on a boat, and he called me to tell me the boat on the next dock was looking. I got an email address and an interview. I lucked out and happened to be a fellow half Canadian half American, as the captain was. A quick trip to Rybovitch to meet the crew, and to drive the captains car back to Lauderdale, and off I was moving onto the boat.

    I guess in the end, meet everyone you can, make contacts, and when you get work, talk to other crew on the dock. Most crew know if another boat is hiring. Work hard, ask questions, and get better at everything you do. Eventually you will get a shot. In my experience, many people have heard about jobs, but they may not have been the right program for that person, but it might be right for you, so ask them for the details. We were happy everyone of our group got a job, and we always helped everyone out whenever we could.

    And back to the original question, when I started my CV listed boats I had experience on, motor boats, sailboats, racing crew. Certifications, and why you want to do this and what you can offer to the boat.

    Good luck
  9. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    It's a time also to value references you might have from previous jobs outside the industry. At entry level, work ethic is important.

    Perlmudder also talks about the crew houses. I would recommend that even someone whose family was local still move into one. The owners get calls too. Obviously be on your best behavior.

    Everyone you meet is potentially a valuable contact. They can also work against you if they see the wrong side of you. People are anxious to help others but only those they deem worthy. The last thing anyone wants is someone they referred to backfire.

    I know several who have ended up getting jobs as a result of taking day work helping clean and detail a boat inside and out.

    Every captain knows dozens of captains.

    Last, keep your facebook and twitter and any other social media clean. While yacht captains may not do much checking there yet, they will follow other industries. Everything you post or that someone posts on your account is public knowledge. If it's something you don't want your mother, girlfriend or future girlfriend, or future employer to know, then get it off of there and keep it off.
  10. kzpl23

    kzpl23 New Member

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    Ok, thanks guys. Sorry I couldn't get back earlier but had not internet. Anyway, I will look into the crew houses depending how much they cost.