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Hello Post Owners from Australia

Discussion in 'Post Yacht' started by islandbay, Dec 30, 2012.

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  1. islandbay

    islandbay New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
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    Location:
    Australia
    Hello Post Owners of the US

    David here from Australia - very keen on importing probably the first Post ever into Australia. We have long admired the lines and classy look of the Post yachts and we are looking to buy a 42 footer probably from the earlier years being the 70s and 80s - it costs a lot to bring a boat to Australia so simply cant afford a 90s or later model.

    If possible would really appreciate some feedback on all the questions - is this the only Post forum site as well - couldnt see any others online anywhere.

    Ok - please excuse the long list of questions - we are just very keen on importing one of the wonderful boats into Australia.

    In the 42 flybridge - are there years to look out for or avoid - what are the issues or problems to look out for in the 42s of the 70s or 80s ?

    We know the hulls are very strong - but have read there are issues with gelcoating ? Any views or info on this?

    The Detroit engines - have only heard good things about them - any views on these units. Diesel incredibly expensive in Australia - on average what is the fuel burn on these combined at cruise speed in a Post 42 ? When buying - what are the things to look out for on the engines / drive lines ?

    Forward facing front windscreens - we see many dont have them. Is it possible to install these on a Post which just has a solid fibreglass front salon section - we really would want to either buy one with forward windscreens or install ourselves if possible.

    The spray issue on 42s - we have no shortage of wind and rough weather down under - is the spray issue a big problem - can it be rectified with any add ons ?
    Did Post solve the spray issues on later model 42s ?

    Actual video footage of a Post 42 under way on Youtube - cant find any video footage of Post 42 being filmed under way from a 2nd boat - does anyone know of any such video footage ?

    If anyone wants to add any other info or help more then welcome

    Thanks to anyone who might help on the above - and great to find this Post forum too

    Cheers
  2. RT46

    RT46 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
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    1,018
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Post came with front windshields in that vintage.

    I have even seen a few with lower stations in the salon.

    good luck with your import and hunt.

    keep us posted.
  3. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Cold Spring Harbor, NY
    Islandbay

    The only gelcoat issue that I am aware of occurred between 1998 and 2002.

    The earlier 42's were very wet boats until the hull change which helped in a following sea also. Some tried to reduce that with spray rails . IMO, all Posts, however, are a bit wetter than their deep V brethren in a head sea, but much more stable because of their flatter running surface aft.

    The very early Posts had clear glass.

    Kafue and others on this forum hail from down under and may be able to give you some local boat leads

    Good luck on your purchase!
  4. islandbay

    islandbay New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
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    Location:
    Australia
    Thanks Beau and RT

    Agree with all the reading I have done that the Posts are a wetter boat - we are kool with that given their beam and stability at rest pros.

    With the clear glass forward in the salon - does anyone know if its possible to add clear glass in by cutting the fibreglass out ? I know there are quite a few boats in the 70s with clear glass - but if we found a nice Post without it would we be able to add the clear glass in later ?

    Thanks again gents - will keep an eye out for Australian 'Posters' on this forum - no pun intended

    Best regards from 40c heat (aprox 105f)
  5. SHAZAM

    SHAZAM Senior Member

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    The Ghetto
  6. RT46

    RT46 Senior Member

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    good catch Shazam on that post...

    I am not a marine architect, but I think you could put a front windsheld into a Post that was glassed over.

    My Post is factory OEM glassed over, but you can easilly see the outline where the windshield would go.

    after looking at my boat, i see no reason why i would not be able to put a front windshield in my boat if i wanted to.

    just make sure you dont go too big on the window and have sufficient center and side support.
  7. Island Runner

    Island Runner Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2010
    Messages:
    77
    Location:
    Florida
    Welcome to the forum David. Have you zeroed in on a boat yet? There are a few things to look for on the 42s from the mid-1970s - 1980s. On my 1976 hull the hull and deck are all glass except the aft bulkhead and I had some water damage to the aft bulkhead on the port side. Pretty much had to replace the bulkhead. The flybridge deck is balsa cored so watch for soft spots. The shroud is secured to the deck using cleat stock and screws set in sealant. The screw holes tend to allow water to enter the core and results in core damage. The helm unit is also secured with cleat stock and screws and you may find damage there as well. When examining the flybridge deck pay careful attention to soft spots around these areas. I ended up replacing the majority of the core in the deck of my flybridge - removed the helm, the port bench seat and lifted the shroud. Not a simple project.

    There are more things to look for too but this post would be extremely long so ask questions and I'm sure we'll all help as best we can.

    The Detroit 6-71 are great. Easy to work on, cheap parts (compared to others) and will keep running and running. Fuel burn is modest all things considered.
  8. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2006
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    1,151
    Location:
    Gold Coast Australia
    Hi Islandbay,
    If I can help with any advice you are welcome to PM me. I have imported a few boats over the years.

    I don’t want to sour your venture, however, for starters, if you don’t mind me re-iterating your opening statement.
    It IS VERY expensive to bring a boat to Australia, so I think you may be looking at this from the wrong angle.
    If you can’t afford to purchase a good boat that needs minor work, and ship it, then don’t do it.

    The one constant in the equation is the surveys (hull and engines), and especially the shipping costs. It is very easy to be blinded by the relatively good, cheap sale price for a great looking boat, but by the time you have it running in the way you want, you may well find it would have been cheaper buying either a more pricier boat in the US in the first place or buy local.

    I went through a lot of boats to find one that justified a $60,000 shipping cost, plus another $15,000, just to get her on the cargo ship.
    I passed on 3 or 4 Hatteras 53’s same model as mine just 10 years younger, with more gear and candy, and $20k less, but then you see the 30 y.o. wiring, plumbing and problems.
    There was a 58 Yachtfisherman that had everything, but I found the problem and ran. It is a lot of fun, but also a lot of time and a cool head is needed.

    I missed out on a beautiful Post. It was completely re-done a few years before and I pushed the price to hard. I understand why you are after one. That is what you need to find, a boat that has most the work DONE or it will end in pain.
    Also please keep this in mind:
    The BEST place to have work done on a Post or any US built boat is in the US!
    Firstly the guys know the boat, secondly the labour costs are better than here and most important, if it needs high volt electrical work then it’s all 110v and you don’t want to be in Aussie ordering online and being charged overs by an electrician who is not used to 110v. Plus the plumbing sizes are often hard to find here. Then if it has 32v (not likely) get ready for more headaches.
    Sorry to be pessimistic and don’t get me wrong, I would still buy my next boat in the US, it’s fun, not difficult if you know the issues and this site is full of people ready to assist.
    Cheers Mate!
  9. chesapeake46

    chesapeake46 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2009
    Messages:
    1,425
    Location:
    Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay & S.Jersey
    Hi Island Bay,

    Welcome to this forum.

    I've got a 46' Post that HAD windows forward and I got rid of them.

    The boat was had leakey windows begfore I bought it.
    The Previous Owner had them professionally repaired.
    The yard that did the first repair was well known and has a respectable reputation. They do nice work.

    I bought the boat and about 1 year later and found that the both windows had begun to leak at the outboard corners.

    After speaking with a couple repair guys I decided to glass them in.
    It was their contention that glass, wood and fiber glass all expand and contract at different rates and that the front windows would always be a spot that had the potential for failure. note: potential. They didn't say it WOULD leak but it was probable.

    Glassing them in eliminated the problem and made the boat look newer too.

    The extra light provided by the forward windows was not worth the maintenance and the worry for me.
    Also extra sunlight means extra radiant heat that the AC units need to over come.
    I don't think Post was ever accused of " Over doing it " in the A/C dept either so every little bit helps.

    At this time the boat is kept in a shed and it would not be such a problem but I never regretted removing them.

    I never will regret buying my Post.
    For my uses, it is bullet proof and well built.

    Good luck, and let us know how you make out whichever boat or wat you choose to go.
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  10. islandbay

    islandbay New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Australia
    Hello Posters - just a quick thanks for your feedback so far ... as a newbie to Posts its all very much appreciated. Am like an eager sponge at the moment -absorbing all the info and feedback.

    Much still to learn but will get there - I think it helps when you have been surrounded by boats all your life and you KNOW that no matter what there will always be issues (ie time, money, headaches) with boats especially of the older vintage ..... but that all said .... the joys and pleasures of ownership have so far anyway always outweighed the headaches for me ..... and I hope that never changes.

    Its 2013 here in my part of the world - so all the best to all for the new year and thanks again for all your feedback.

    Cheers
  11. scooperfl

    scooperfl New Member

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    Dec 18, 2012
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    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    You had asked about fuel burn: I've got a '79 42 with naturals. You can probably average 0.8NM/g with a good bottom (that means all of the old paint/unused throughhulls removed), stong engines, and moderate-light load. For comparison, on the newer ones with Volvo power, I have heard 30gph at 24kts.

    If 17kts is ok, natural detroits provide the most reliability and least maintenance. The turbos will certainly give deliver more speed. On the older ones, I think the negative handling characteristics you hear about occur at higher speeds.

    Most, if not all of the problems you will encounter are deferred/improper maintenance. Most of that vintage will have had some areas of wet coring by now (flybridge stantions, around deck hatches, around flybridge perimeter screws). Sometime in around 77-'78 they switched to glass over wood superstructure. Some hulls have had blisters-some have not. I'm not at all sure why.

    Mine has a glassed over plywood "mask" that the previous owner swore was factory.

    I have the original price sheet, manual, and brochure if you are interested.
  12. islandbay

    islandbay New Member

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    Location:
    Australia
    Thanks Scooper, Chesapeake and all

    Slowly learning but its a long long road when your starting from scratch with a boat you have never owned before.

    That approx fuel burn Scooper of 0.8NM / G - thats at cruise of approx 17knots is it on yours ?

    Also anyone any ideas on what a cruise of say 8 knots fuel burn might be - we have a long river system where its all 8 knots speed limit - very nice river system for cruising and our future Post wont all be about deep sea fishing

    ...and questions about fuel burn are def because of the very high price of fuel in Australia ... and its going up by the day !!

    Like the Post engines the more I read about them - am a big fan of strong and simple.

    Last question - being a tall family (all well over 6ft - the men anyway) - does anyone know the height of the salon area in a Post 42 ?

    Thanks again all
  13. Island Runner

    Island Runner Member

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    Location:
    Florida
    David - How tall is "well over 6ft"? I'm 6' - 2" and my head is maybe 1" or so below the headliner in the salon. If you are over 6' - 3" you may find yourself stooping a bit walking through the boat. Headroom is better down in the galley & staterooms.

    Fuel burn would be more of guess for me - without FloScans I hesitate to say what I burn at 8 knots. That would be around 1000 rpms or so with my J&T 6-71T. I tend to either idle or cruise. I get roughly .8NM/gal cruising at 20 knots if that's any help.

    IR
  14. scooperfl

    scooperfl New Member

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    Location:
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    I'll guess about 1.5nm/g at 7.5-8kts.
    An old boat Boating Magazine test from 4/76 lists:
    1000rpm/7.32kts/3.9gph/1.88nm/g
    1500/10.23/7.5/1.36
    2000/16.46/15/1.1
    2400/21.83/28.6/0.76

    Mine will not do so well because she has many, many coats of bottom paint, 4transducers, old engines, and too much gear on board. I think they were a bit "optimistic" as well.

    Head room is 6'-2" in the salon.

    I scanned the paper work and have two 8MB files. PM me an address that can handle that and I will be happy to send them your way.
  15. Island Runner

    Island Runner Member

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    Location:
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    Happened to measure the headroom on my old 42 and it varies a bit. 6' - 2" where you enter from the cockpit but then increases due to the slope of the flybridge deck. Measured at the steps going down to the galley it's 6' - 4 3/4". Down in the galley and master stateroom the headroom is around 6' - 4" - 5" and in the foreward stateroom it's closer to 6' - 6". Variations depending on exactly where you measure due to camber of deck, etc. but that's a pretty good assessment of mine.

    IR