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Hatteras GT-54 Sportfish or Viking?

Discussion in 'General Sportfish Discussion' started by Liberty, Nov 18, 2011.

  1. Liberty

    Liberty Senior Member

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    Hi Everyone

    Jees I got close to ordering a new Viking, but Hatt are back in the fight.

    Unfortunately I have returned home from the Lauderdale show, stupidly without running the Hatt. The closest one to me is on the other side of the planet. I just got home from 3 weeks around the world in 14 cities and don't want to travel again.

    Obviously the GT 60 review above reads well.

    I did get to climb over the GT54 and was deeply impressed on engineering, wiring, fit and finish.

    Can any please give me any feedback on the ride of the Hatteras GT 54, and in particular how it rides compared to a Viking 50 or 54?

    Many thanks
    Nigel
  2. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    I've sea trialed the Viking 57' sportfish, Hatteras 54 GT, the Hatt 63GT. Of these three boats, the Hatt 63GT was clearly the best in ride and performance. This can be directly attributed to Donald Blount & Associates, who designed the GT63 hull for Hatteras.

    The GT63 ran very level with very little bow rise. In fact, the GT63 was equipped with the same engines as the GT54 (if I recall, C-32's) and the top speed was identical for both boats. We hit 40 knots coming in Port Everglades. Pretty impressive for a boat that is 9 feet longer than it's little brother.

    In contrast to the near perfect ride and attitude of the 63, the GT54 rode bow high, but not as bad as the Viking 57'. Of these two boats, my personal preference is Hatteras because it has a solid glass bottom, but also because how solid the hull felt in 3-4 footers. Very little sound is being transmitted through the hull. It felt like a cold-molded hull in comparison to the Viking, which conveyed more sound from cavitation, prop wash and wave slap.

    Loren Schweizer's review of the GT60 is dead-on accurate. The GT54 is SO identical in every nuance and characteristic, that a review of the 54 is redundant. I've attached running shots of the Hatt 54GT and the Viking 57', both riding bow high. Again, the GT63 rode very level in comparison.

    Hatt 54GT...

    Attached Files:

  3. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    Viking 57'...

    Attached Files:

  4. Liberty

    Liberty Senior Member

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    Thanks very much for that.

    I'd love to say that the GT63 is in my budget but it most assuredly isn't!

    :rolleyes:

    Thanks for your response. The Hatt is getting a lot of good response.
  5. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    Here's a running shot of the GT63. Use the flybridge deck as a basis to judge angle of attack, because all of these boats have a pretty dramatic sheer line that accentuates the appearance of running bow high...

    Attached Files:

  6. CaptTom

    CaptTom Senior Member

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    Liberty,
    If I may add a little more to your quest, and with the permission of YF, here's a link of the sea trial I did for SEA Magazine on the Hatteras GT54 earlier this year: Sea - America's Western Boating Magazine

    Although I have been more of a Viking fan for many years, I am very impressed with the GT line of Hatteras sportfishers. The styling, ride, accommodations, etc are top notch.
  7. SHAZAM

    SHAZAM Senior Member

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    When did Hatteras start building solid glass hulls? I was under the impression that they were still cored above the water line? :confused:
  8. Liberty

    Liberty Senior Member

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    Thanks CaptTom.

    Your review confirms my thoughts....
  9. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

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    Hi Liberty,
    Keep in mind that the Hatteras and Vikings you are looking at do not have:
    Anchor pulpit, chain (at least 75 to 100 metres is my preference), anchors (one spare in the lazarette) and winch.
    Davit.
    Bow rails.
    Tender: whether that ends up being a solid hull or inflatable.
    All this will add weight to the bow and affect performance.
    At the moment I am looking at getting a light weight inflatable for my Hatteras as I seem to find the best fishing far out in 150 fathoms or more and have no more than life jackets and EPIRBS. I don’t want a davit just yet.
    Unless you go the Palm Beach way and travel as the photos show, which makes a great looking boat, but try going to the bow as I had to a few times on a long trip home and it is not too comfortable without rails!
    Just my 2c.+
  10. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    I should have clarified. The subsurface hull is solid glass, the sides are cored.
  11. Liberty

    Liberty Senior Member

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    Yeah thanks Kafue

    I am most definitely getting pulpit, anchor, windlass, chain, tender, bow rails. Kids need bow rails ....

    If anything this will fix any concerns about a "bow high" ride ... :D

    I'm just wondering now whether you can see over a tender on the fore deck.

    Visibility wasn't great on the boat at the show - maybe empty tanks - and certainly no personal gear to weigh her down.
  12. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

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    If visibility is a concern at the early stage, empty fuel tanks or not, I would be concerned.
    The tender should EASILY be seen over from the FB.
    How many on board at the time? Where were the most passengers? Trim used?
    I doubt Hatteras would mess this up on such a boat.
    Nigel, for this amount $'s, take the Hatt out in REAL sea conditions with someone from this forum or a trusted expert and go from there. Not with a group from the broker/company.
    You have a lot of support here from a good group, make the most of it before you pay the $$$$$'s.
    Good luck!
    If you want to go or know some spots off the Gold Coast for the big ones, give me a PM. If you believe ;)
    BTW I believe from what I have read the Hatteras GT is the best.
    But match the boat with the right power.

    Good Luck Mate!
  13. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    The Hatteras 54' is a great riding hull. I took one out in 6+ foot seas on the nose and then beam and ran the boat at it's cruise speed and it was very comfortable ride. The 54' with a full tower will have a tendancy to lean to one side (a little) or the other with a strong wind on the beam but can
    corrected with trim tabs.

    The viking will be more stable at trolling speeds, but you'll be throttling back in a 3-5' head sea. Both are good boats.

    I don't like tenders on the bow and davit's of a sportfish, but if you have to have one, you have to have one.
  14. Liberty

    Liberty Senior Member

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    Thanks Capt J.

    I don't like tenders/davits on sportfish either, but apparently these days divorce is even more expensive than fishing ...

    :D

    The only other option is to have one hanging off the transom (Searay style) when you go boating which is even worse ... I will endeavour to keep the weight down up there.

    Thanks for your comments.
  15. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    What about towing a 20' center console? Sometimes that works out better than the tender, sometimes not because you have to leave the center console somewhere if you're going sportfishing.

    Yeah, a friend of mine sold his last sportfish because after getting divorced for the 3rd time, he didn't have enough 1/2's left. LOLOLOL
  16. Liberty

    Liberty Senior Member

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    Yeah, as you say sometimes it works and sometimes not.

    I'm not that keen on towing tenders in big seas and particularly not for bar crossings ...

    Thanks for the suggestion anyway.

    And as I had a former CEO of BHP tell me, "Marry Well or Marry Often" ...

    :D
  17. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

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    I tow a 13 foot Boston Whaler with a 40hp without any problems. The Boston used to be the tender for my 58 Offshore but when I sold the Offshore I just could not part with this ugly old duckling. I think it is almost 15 or maybe 20 years old. We sometimes fish in the Seaway off her. Great boat, just needs a repaint etc.

    However, like you, I would not cross a bar with her. I am about to buy a lightweight inflatable that will be tied on the Hatteras bow for my deep sea times. Just something to keep me and my passengers afloat for 3 to 4 hours in case of ........?
    I am very superstitious so let’s not discuss what could go wrong in 100 to 200 fathoms with lots of fresh fish on board:(

    A few years ago I had the biggest yellow fin tuna I have ever caught on the line, massive fight, then dead weight. All I landed was the head and part of the body. There are some big fins out there!
  18. Liberty

    Liberty Senior Member

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    Yes, I always have a self-inflating raft on board. That's not optional. As you say, some big sets of teeth out there.

    Now I think harder on it, you and Capt J make a good a point about a towable tender for regular use around the bay, and just pack a separate portable for longer trips. It also gives me much better options for fishing around the boat -- chasing Tuna on fly is an old pastime.

    Just how fast can you comfortably tow a 20' centre console? How does this go in 25 knot cross winds?
  19. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

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    Hi Liberty,
    Depends on:
    Sea/water conditions.
    Wind direction.
    Weight of 20 footer.
    Make sure any fittings used for towing are capable of the strain.
    Watch out for the idiots (especially on the Gold Coast Broadwater) who cut in on your wake especially jet skis.
    I like to have low speed tow and choose the wave to the condition when towing.
    Etc. etc.

    Fact is, no big deal, experience:
    Do it a few times and you will know how far back you want the boat you are towing by the wash waves behind you.
    Further is better than closer, always, IMHO.
    When you find an anchorage I usually send one of my sons to pull in the tender and GO away on it ASAP so that I can anchor right.

    Re: RFD or “self-inflators” I have had them on a few my boats and always thought what a great business!!! After all there is not much chance of a “no success” refund! i.e. how many ocean racers were lost when these “life boxes” did not work?
    I am sure most do, but you get my point. I would rather have a real alternative with a quick release.
    Also, the BIG deal is that the cost of a service on these RFD's which must be done is not reflective of the value.
    In Aussie we have unforgiving seas but, luckily we have a great response system.
  20. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    You can tow a 20' center console 25 knots, sometimes 30 knots if you have the proper tow setup without a problem. There was a thread on here a while ago about tow bridles and a lot of people commented on what they were towing and how as well as experiences. 25 knot crosswinds are usually not an issue if you're towing it fast enough, or if you want to go slow and tow it slow just stick the tenders motor in the water or some chain behind it for resistance and it will track straight usually. A 20' center console is a heck of a lot more useful over a tender, but it's drawback is you cannot really go out trolling with it behind you.......

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