Click for Abeking Click for Lurssen Click for Lurssen Click for Apolonnian Click for Ocean Alexander

Got a new fridge today, damage to door, getting attitude.

Discussion in 'HVAC' started by Norseman, Mar 18, 2020.

You need to be registered and signed in to view this content.
  1. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    13,757
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    You're a gluten for punishment. A Dremel with one of those diamond cutting wheels would zip that off in a minute flat. LOL Good luck with it though.
  2. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    Picture of pram, or it never happened..:D
  3. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    Yo Captain J: I dance to a different drummer and this project keeps me busy.
    Wish I could post pictures, but I can’t seem to get the pixel size down to the max required on this board, then get in trouble with Managment.
    (I always end up asking forgiveness rather than asking permission first)
    I do have a thread on the Albin Owners forum on this project with lots of pictures, but one have to be logged in to read it, doubt many members here are dual qualified.
    All good, spent an hour with a flat file today, trying to open the upper lip a few
    mm. Problem is that the floor under the fridge is not flat, it starts sloping up towards the bow. New fridge is bigger than old fridge, hence I have to lift it up, then lift the floor, etc. Almost there, only a few more hours of filing and sanding in the 90 degree heat. Great weight loss project, but well worth it with cold beer on the other end..:eek:
  4. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2004
    Messages:
    9,566
    Location:
    Satsuma, FL
    I think one of the first Glen L design for a $10 boat (or something that floated).
    Fresh out of tech school Late 70s when I started. Early 80s when I finished.
    It was repaired of rotted plywood a few times before completed. Finally added to the burn pile by the early 90s.
    I have no digitized pictures, I'll look thru my folks photo albums if they took any pics on their property.

    Old roof sheathing plywood with 1 x 2 corner frames and gunnel. Fat square end and smaller square bow.
    Left over house paint and nails held her together.
    5hp air cooled Craftsman outboard made her fly.
    I do still have the outboard.
    Sailed like **** (old Scotch-Guard bed sheet) and that's when I personally gave up on hoisting rags.

    Dude, you calling me in??





    We Good? :D:D:D
  5. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale

    Well, not sure I can trust any more, no picture, no pram. :(

    Go to FB Albin 28TE Group and you will be rewarded with pics of my glorious fridge project, it should come out good in the end, like a prefect steak and potato dinner. :D
  6. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    13,757
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    Norseman's selling the steak, and not the sizzle! :D
  7. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    Easy there big boy: I got the goods and the sizzle but you are not my type, fortunately...;)
  8. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    6,303
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    Next time get one of those vibrating tools with a carbide blade. Will cut thru anything with less dust and much straighter. I always have one on board.
  9. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    Much straighter?
    Did you see my manual cut?
    I am old fashioned, why use power tools if hand tools work better?
    If I remember correctly, you built your own sailboat..
    Easier to buy one for half the price and 1/1000 the labor, but you built one:eek:
  10. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    Finally got the fridge mounted.
    Lots of work, but it kept me out of the bars:
    First of all, my apologies for taking trash about Isotherm:
    The gave me excellent support along the way and even donated a “Flange Kit” to the cause.
    Impressed with the product and the support.

    The issues installing was about a slightly bigger fridge than the boat was designed for.
    Had to shoehorn the fridge in the opening, build up a new floor and keep trimming the opening upwards as the back of the fridge kept hitting the upward slope inside of the hull towards the bow.
    Should be good now, it took only 2 weeks working 1-2 hours per day using hand tools only.

    8E2F8430-8CE4-47A4-A8E2-19A2A75F0C90.jpeg
  11. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    11,228
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Well thankfully the bars are closed now, and with the fridge in what will you do?o_O Looks good, and now you got a place to keep some beer cold.
  12. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    13,757
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    After 20 man hours to install it, there sure isn't enough space in THAT fridge to replace all of the calories he lost with beer!!!!!!!!
  13. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    11,228
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Sometimes you should just call the guy. :cool:
  14. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    It is all good, kept me busy, but also been goofing off during the installation,
    no harm done labor of love, I guess..:cool:
  15. mapism

    mapism Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,235
    Location:
    Sardinia
    If you think that you'll have other occasions to tackle similar jobs in the future, you might consider a Fein oscillating multi-tool.
    You'd never believe how much time it can save till you try it.

    Btw, it used to be ridiculously expensive years ago, but recently it went down in price to the point that it would have probably paid for itself in this job alone.
    That said, a labour of love always deserve respect, of course.
    And the final result does look pretty good in fact, well done!
  16. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    Yes, I considered power tools, including a “Multi Tool”, but this project is rather small, I don’t do this for a living and I really don’t mind doing physical labor, I love to sweat and work hard: In my younger days I sailed on big ships as deck hand (officially O.S.) and on shore I would take day jobs emptying rail road cars of scrap metal and jobs carrying fire wood up 2-3 flights of stairs to old people back in the Scandiland.
    Always done hard labor, never went to college, this little wimpy fridge project is noting, makes me feel youngish again.
    I have been know to wash and detail my own boats, and also been known to prepare big yachts for the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show, on hands and knees scrubbing teak decks.:confused:
    It is all good, little stuff like sawing and cutting away on fiberglass for an hour or two a day, to bridge the gap between lunch and beer time is only healthy, especially in the a non-air conditioned cabin making sweat by the liter. :D
    Thx for the concern, but as a stubborn square head, I do this myself.
    Happy to hire guys to maintain properties, cut grass and wax cars, but the boat is my baby, not sure I would trust anybody for this kind of work.
    (I do hire diesel mechanics for important stuff, but do my own oil/filter/anodes, etc services.)
    Did a test ride on Odin today with Beer in Fridge. Worked good, cold beer is a beautiful thing.
    (No charter work obviously, we are shut down, pleasure only. www.odincharters.com)
  17. mapism

    mapism Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,235
    Location:
    Sardinia
    Wow, what a cute little boat! Also her drawing on your homepage is lovely, btw.
    Next time I'll be around FL I'll get in touch for a sunset cruise, which sounds very nice!
    Together with a beer or three, obviously.

    Actually, the best sunsets I ever enjoyed in FL were either in Key West or along Indian Rocks Beach, near Tampa.
    Pretty sure you can't see the sun going down at the ocean horizon anywhere around Ft.Lauderdale, for obvious geographical reasons.
    But I guess it must be nice also to see it the other way round, looking towards downtown from the water!

    Fully understood re. the wish to deal with these jobs manually.
    Just don't underestimate the flexibility of the "Fein" thing which I mentioned previously (you can easily google for videos about it).
    If and when you should tackle some similar (or possibly also much more demanding) jobs again in the future, it really is in a class of its own, compared to most other power tools.
    I have no interest at all with the company who builds it, mind.
    Just a very impressed user, even if just occasional.
  18. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    You are On: Cold beer, Cold fridge.:cool:
    (Can’t really serve or sell alcohol on the boat, don’t have a liquor license,
    but I tell my guests to look in the cooler, if there is a bottle of chilled Prosecco
    From a previous trip, please help your yourself: There always is and the previous trip was private, not commercial)

    As for cute little boat: When I was looking 3-4 years ago, somebody on this here Yacht Forum suggested I look at the Albin 28TE, I did and fell in love.
    (Had to kiss 2 frogs first: Survey and Sea-trial of 2 Albin 28TEs that was not maintained to my standards)
    Good boats, like a Swiss Army Knife: Small enough to be owner maintained and cleaned, big enough to be somewhat seaworthy: CE approved Class B Coastal. Enough cabin and galley space for a couple to sleep and cook for a week or two.
    Easy on fuel and service with a single diesel, easy to maneuver with a bow thruster.
    Lived on the Fort Lauderdale waterfront for 21 years and seen enough big tubs that never move and deteriorate rapidly as the owners can’t really afford that big old boat they purchased cheap and they had no idea how much boat ownership cost.
    The “drawing” on my webpage is really a computer generated picture, my web guy threw it in for free.
    Wife is an artist and should make me a good painting one of these days, but she never has the time:
    This is her work:
    www.susanhanssen.com
  19. cleanslate

    cleanslate Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,141
    Location:
    Cherry Hill, NJ
    There are two of ''your'' boats here in my yard in Cape May. One is identical to yours , cream color , black water line and trim I believe. Yes it's a great little boat. I could see me getting into one someday. Nice job on the Refrigerator. Let's see if the yard did it for you...$800/$1200 ? or more.

    I always do that "what if the yard did it for me'' mental $$ calculation before I start any project on my boat. It's a great motivational tool! Helps me get right to it and get her done!
    Any old Jigsaw with a fine 24 tooth for'' cutting metal'' blade would have saved you time also...I'm sure you have one of those buried around some where.
  20. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    11,228
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Every X-mas and B'day since I got married I asked my wife to get me this tool or that. After 43 years I've got quite a collection. Some I've only used a few times, but what a difference having the right tool for the job makes. But I have a big garage to keep them in. Unfortunately for most livaboards and apartment dwellers space is at a premium. I remember when I moved to Florida and rented a townhome my tool storage area was the closet under the stairs. My main tools then were a 3 blade hand saw and my Leatherman. For those in that situation keep in mind that almost any tool can be rented from Home Depot or Taylor tool rental or such. The right tool really does make the job easier. Still my Leatherman is always on my belt and seems to get used every day.
    I joked earlier about "Call the guy". The other day the sink in my recently remodeled bathroom was clogged. My wife said to call the plumber. We have a plumber here who advertises that he'll clear any one clog for $99. No thanks, I have a good snake. Well I crawled under my sink to remove the stopper only to find that the nut where the stopper rod goes into the drainpipe doesn't even require a wrench anymore. They have thumb-screws. Pulled out the stopper to find a big ball of hair. Threw out the hair, put it back together with a screen rather than a stopper and was done in less than 10 minutes using no tools at all. Boy would I have felt stupid paying $99 and waiting around for a plumber to do that. DIY gives great satisfaction, and saves a ton of money. Now that I'm retired I only charge $20 per hour for my labors in what I do. I'd have had to work 5 hours to pay a plumber to do that 10 minute job. Wife, honey, sweetheart did you hear that???:mad: Whenever I do jobs around the house I show my wife for when/if I'm no longer around. She shows no interest, but I pray the lessons soak in.