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Future liveaboard on sportfisher.

Discussion in 'General Sportfish Discussion' started by DocSailor, Aug 22, 2015.

  1. DocSailor

    DocSailor New Member

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    Well, as the post says, I intend to live on a sportfishing boat. i was looking at 40-50ft and within 25 years old. what are some tips and things to consider before i begin my maiden voyage? The total persons living on board be me and my dog. No woman no cry!
  2. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Ok, so who, what, where, why, and how? Who, I see you're 25 years old. Are you tied to a land job? Where will you be living? What will you be doing on the boat? Fishing in what waters? Where do you intend to cruise? What is your experience on boats in the range you describe? Will you have guests when you fish? On overnight trips? How many?

    I think living aboard can be great for a young, single person. For living aboard the most boat you can find and afford is often recommended, but then people live aboard much smaller boats.

    What brand boats have caught your eye in your search to this point?
  3. DocSailor

    DocSailor New Member

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    well excellent questions, i really dont have a full land job yet, but i am researching emergency medicine such as paramedic, i have fond several jobs on military bases that pay quite nicely and given my 7 years in the medical field i feel i am quite qualified for these posistions. i intend to live somewhere from South Carolina along the coast to Florida, there are many places to work, inexpensive to live and good fishing. i have also thought about the Chesapeake bay. i have fished those waters before and know them quite well. with those in mind i can go pretty much anywhere. my dad and i used to fish on his 30 foot sportfisher and do the repairs on fuel tanks minor engine work and wiring as well. we also fished the Chesapeake and OBX. other than that, my experience is somewhat limited. but inspite of limited experience, i have a plan to become more familiarized with marine concepts. i was thinking of pursuing several Trade schools such as diesel engine mechanic school and marine techincal schools. i wont be seeking employment in these fields. but having the expertise will save me money in the long run for future expenses on a boat of that size, i.e. minor and major engine overhauls, fiberglass work, transmissions and stuffing boxes.

    the brands of boats i like the best are hatteras, post, bertram, ocean yachts, and my personal favorite viking's
  4. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    I'm guessing your price range you're looking for is rather low too from the ages you mentioned. I think your idea of some training is good as long as you don't overestimate your abilities upon completing them.

    I see one other issue developing and that is your lack of experience in handling a boat in the size range you're looking. That will entail some learning as well.

    So, on to boat and size. The larger the better except with you keeping it at a marina that pushes up the monthly costs, so you may not want to go larger.

    As to the brands you mentioned some very large differences in the condition you'd expect to find and the integrity of the hull and structure. Search on this site a bit and see all the Post and Bertram owners, in love with the brands, but having had to do quite a bit of work restoring their boats and dealing with issues. Hatteras and Viking in the age you're looking are far more likely to have no structural issues. I'm not knowledgeable enough about Ocean to speak to it.

    A question I didn't ask is whether you cook or eat out. As to the differences you'll experience between 35 and 50'. At 50' you can get a full size galley, decent for preparing meals. At 35', the galley will be more similar to a small kitchenette you might find in a long stay hotel or an efficiency, but perhaps even more limited. At 50', you will get a decent sized stateroom with a regular bed and some room to get around it. At 35', you'll normally get a V-Berth. The living areas will obviously be larger on the 50' and when the weather is good outside, that probably won't be too much of an issue, but when it isn't, you could find it tight in a smaller boat.

    You will pay an added fee at most marinas as a liveaboard. Many marinas will not allow you. The further you move north of Fort Lauderdale, the lower the prices for dockage. Also, keep in mind that the electric rates you'll pay won't be the type you'd negotiate in a normal setting. In South Florida the difference between 35' and 50' could easily be $300 to $600 per month. A 35' might cost you $650/month and a 50' might be $950. Now, some marinas won't have slips in the 35' range so you'll pay for a larger slip. As an example, I pulled up a Jacksonville marina. A 50' slip there is $660 per month and the smallest they have is 41' for $480 per month. A random marina in NC is $640 for a 50' and $500 for a 35'. Another SC marina at $500 and $350.

    As this is your home and your boat you need to balance the two needs. As a boat, I think the size won't make a lot of difference for your purposes.

    You need to consider location and a few issues I think of are job market, cost of living, climate, and proximity to the gulf stream and good fishing spots in general.
  5. DocSailor

    DocSailor New Member

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    I intend to eat in more than out, which can save me money as well. I don't think a 35-40 ft is a good fit for me but i think a 40-45ish ft is a better fit, a lot of what I'm seeing are a full queen bed in the v-birth with some bunk beds as well with stand up shower and a separate head from the shower. i know that Viking's and Hatteras's share the same hull and build, which like you stated is why they tend to hold up better with age, I'm surprised the Bertram isn't the same. i think fl would be nice but too expensive and hot year round, but i would really relish the Carolina's, I think with their seasons and lower costs it would be a prime spot. i already figured that the boat will depreciate with age, but as long as shes stable and holds her own I have no problem with age. with the prices from marinas would that include shore power and water? I cant imagine it wouldn't as the marinas that my dad had his boat at, those were included.
  6. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Generally it does not include shorepower, especially for a liveaboard. Shore power typically is metered at rates such as $0.15/kwh. What did you mean by Viking's and Hatteras sharing the same hull? Bertram has had it's good and bad. We have some Bertram lovers and haters here. However, suffice it to say they do have more structural issues than Hatteras or Viking.
  7. DocSailor

    DocSailor New Member

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    While working at Boaters World, I was always told that Hatteras's and Viking's shared the same hulls, meaning it was a joint investment for both of them. They worked together on their design. I know Bertram lovers are out there but if they have a tendency to have structural issues that takes a lot of work. Personally I think that Hatteras's and Viking's are better design and sharper looking. I know after all that their hulls were born off the coast of NC to handle the rougher waters.
  8. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    I can only advise not to believe what you hear at Boaters World.

    They are similar in many ways, but one grew out of boat building in High Point, NC, got hulls designed by Hargrave and then set up shop in New Bern NC. The other was a boat builder in trouble in NJ which brothers who were in real estate (one a lawyer) purchased. Both have a long and storied history and I'd suggest reading more about them. Viking remains a family owned and operated company. Hatteras is owned by an investment firm, Versa.
  9. DocSailor

    DocSailor New Member

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    This is true, after all Dave Ritz sucked at managing businesses.What can you tell me about different engines which are better in the long run, with good fuel efficiency. Also do you know anyone whom I can talk with about Viking's in the later 80s upper 40 foots.
  10. DocSailor

    DocSailor New Member

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    also how are two stroke diesels?
  11. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Hate to be your buzz-kill, but I hope you have some serious money behind you. Your age, work history and moving to a new area will keep you from getting a loan for the boat, as will if it's an old boat. That means you'll most likely have to buy all cash. It's also a terrible (depreciating) investment. So if you have the scratch you'd be far better off buying a house. Living on a boat could also hinder your finding a job as most employers look for stability, and living on a boat doesn't portray that. Living on a boat is expensive. Besides the obvious (slip rent, electric, fuel, maintenance, etc.) one of the best ways to stretch a pay check is to buy in bulk. Buying everything from the larger bottle of ketchup to stocking up at Costco can save a person thousands of dollars per year. That requires space to store however, and that doesn't exist on a boat.

    One bright spot for you is what's happening to the global markets this past couple of weeks. If it continues there could be some very good boat deals to be had as people try to unload their toys. You could possibly even assume someone's loan. Back in '09 a client of mine was offered a young 50' Sea Ray for $1 (and assume the loan). The boat however was worth $200K less than what was owed.
  12. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    They are getting a bit long in the tooth these days and finding guys who are fully proficient with them is harder and harder.

    That said I would quite like to have a stationary 8V71 in my shed at home that I could start up a couple of times a year just for the fun of it. I love the sound of those things.
  13. captjohn22

    captjohn22 Member

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    Aside from all of the practical reasons for not living on a boat take a look at a 44' Henriques. I bought a 1989 vintage last year and I love it . Salon is of reasonable size as is the galley down. The guest stateroom is on the small size but acquit for short time stays. The master is as good as other brands of that size and age and the head is larger than most with a real man sized shower. Strap a set on and go for it. I wish I had done this 30 years ago.

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