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| Fincantieri Yachts | 140M | "Ocean Victory" ex Project Victory/6218 | 2014 |

Discussion in 'Fincantieri Yacht' started by German Yachting, Apr 19, 2014.

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  1. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    I have heard from a source pretty close to the action that the brake failed when anchoring and the guy was trying to get the guillotine on it when the bitter end ripped out of the locker and wiped him out. The rest of the crew are suffering shock and disbelief from what I hear.

    I have heard today of this yacht predecessor having fairly major brake and windlass problems in its early life.
  2. Ken Bracewell

    Ken Bracewell Senior Member

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    That sounds plausible. Tragic in any event.
  3. ekiqa

    ekiqa Member

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    I lack knowledge of such large ships, but it used to be standard that the bitter end was secured to the ship. Is that no longer the case? Due to the forces involved? Safer to let the chain and anchor go?

    The yacht predecessor, meaning Serene? Would the failure then be due to Fincantieri or to the anchor machinery supplier?
  4. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    The bitter end should be secured. The ongoing investigation should reveal all.
  5. CptnMaxwell

    CptnMaxwell New Member

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    Definitely a tragedy as well as a reminder to everyone about the hazards associated with operation of heavy equipment.

    The Cayman Islands registry have released a Flyer to the Shipping and Yachting Industry - see attached. While inaccurate in the reporting of the dimensions of the vessel, it does have more information including photos of the failed windlass brake.

    The report does highlight the importance of identification of potential hazards and having plans in place to reduce risk if a failure should occur.

    The failure of the windlass brake is still under investigation.

    Can anyone confirm the manufacture of the windlass?

    Attached Files:

  6. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Another C/E I know who has had major windlass brake issues just sent me that flyer.

    If OV is the same as its predecessor it will be a Steen Windlass.
  7. Olivio

    Olivio New Member

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    What is the anchor chain size? should be studlink around 42 - 50 mms?
  8. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    I don't believe the chain size had anything to do with the failure, the brake didn't hold, the chain ran out and it ripped the bitter end fixing point out of the locker were the sequence of events as I understand it.
  9. Olivio

    Olivio New Member

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    Sure, I think so; however I watching the images and I wonder the small dimensions of the brake band (supposing chain size about 42-50) especially the diameter of the screw and the universal joint... but could be my optical impression only.
  10. Gage Rowden7

    Gage Rowden7 Senior Member

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  11. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    It is just a magazine posting a link to the original Cayman Flyer and one Captain who was not there offering his opinion
  12. curiouspeter

    curiouspeter Member

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    But do you think enclosed mooring decks are less safe?
  13. HTMO9

    HTMO9 Senior Member

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    When properly designed not at all. If equipped with a fold-out mooring wing or opening side hatches and full standing height with suffiicient headroom on the complete deck plus enough elbow clearance for the crew and good lighting, they are as safe as any open mooring (or officially called service deck) deck. But with classed yachts or ships this parameters are watched and normally checked by the classification societies.

    The problems will arise, when the covered cervice deck is crammed with loose items like spare mooring lines, dinghies, and personal belongings of crew, like bicycles, kayaks, etc. The next problem is the the need of a watch on the fold-out mooring wing. The limited visibility for deckhands through the fairleads requires especially on larger yachts / ships, a supervisor on the corresponding side, to warn crew members of upcomming danger like the possible breaking of a mooring line. Butcovered aft service decks are worth, because they much smaller and on yachts mostly seperated on port and starboard.

    The anker winches and its operation are one more field of possible trouble. As those machinery is out of site for the officers on the bridge, it requires more attention, as far as maintenance and operation are concerned, by the bosun and the engineers. On open service decks of larger yachts, the SS or chromed machinery is the figurehead of the ship and permanently visible to the ownership and guests. If it is below deck, it is out of site, simply as that.

    And if a heavy chain and anker are running out at high speed and a rotten or undersized winch break cant stop it, or the responsible crew member fails to stop it, even a beefy bitter end will not be able to stop it either. Breaking mooring lines and around beating chains are quite often (far to often) the reason for heavy injuries or death on ship. The last accident we had on one of our ships, was a breaking mooring line, causing a broken leg and arm of one of our deckhands. But this was caused by a second ship pushing ours forward in a lock of the Kiel Canal.

    At first look, the service deck of victory looks to be sufficient as far as standing height and available room are concerned. But I would not allow the placement of those dinghies in that room and I would also question the elevated base of the anker / mooring winches. They are limiting the space of escape, when things go wild.
  14. curiouspeter

    curiouspeter Member

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    HTMO9, that's very insightful. Thank you for your answer.
  15. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    A look at "Ocean Victory" from distance and with her helicopter landing at the end.

  16. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    "Ocean Victory"

  17. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    Going into Gibraltar...

  18. Gage Rowden7

    Gage Rowden7 Senior Member

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    Stunning looking yacht!
  19. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    Another one of "Ocean Victory" going into Gibraltar.

  20. Gage Rowden

    Gage Rowden Member

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    Love the colors on her.