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Ferretti Unveils Plan For CRN...

Discussion in 'Ferretti Yacht' started by YachtForums, Feb 28, 2006.

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  1. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    The Ferretti Group has announced a strategic development programme for CRN to strengthen its competitiveness and further consolidate its presence in the sectors concerning megayachts and maxiyachts in steel and composite materials.

    The programme forecasts concentrating on the production and sale of three-deck yachts in composite materials and steel, which measure 128ft (39m) and above.

    The company has made considerable investments in its Ancona production site, which features 80,000m2 and is currently working on 27 orders. The development programme will see CRN increasing its ability to compete in the mega- and maxi yacht sectors by producing yachts up to 80m (263ft).

    As a result Ferretti Yachts, the Group's top brand that accounts for over a third of its total production, will become responsible for the production and sale of semi-customised, two-deck yachts in composite materials. The emphasis will be on the Custom Line 97, 112, and Navetta 30 models.

    "Given the opportunities which stem from the expansion of the megayacht segment, we believe this choice to be a huge opportunity for the Ferretti Group," said Gabriele Del Torchio, Ferretti Group chief executive officer.

    "This reorganisation will enable CRN to concentrate on achieving increasingly more important aims, and Ferretti Yachts and its network of dealers to enjoy new and indeed greater market satisfaction."
  2. maxlax

    maxlax New Member

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    i was reading up on the cutom line 112. and i noticed that the range was 620 nm. now i like the design and the size but is it possible to increase the distance or is the a similar boat with a longer distance?
  3. nilo

    nilo Senior Member

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    planing boats vs semi placements

    Custom Line 112 and 97 are designed as planning hulls. This means they best perform at a planning speed, which I presume would be around minimum 17-18 knots for these boats. When you want to take a boat to plane you have to have very powerful engines and minimum weight. As you increase the weight, you have to increase the power and there is a limitation to this, because as you increase the power you consume more.

    So, the fuel capacity of these boats are designed at an optimum to reach the designed planning speed and at the same time achieve a certain acceptable range. Considering that you do not really cover long distances and open oceans on a planning boat, 620 miles for this boat is an acceptable range.

    Of course there might be additional fuel capacity installed, mainly for temporary use during longer passages, but as I tried to explain, this will not be helping the optimization of the boat's basic design parameters.

    If you want to have a longer range and still achieve high speeds at certain periods of your cruising, I suggest you go for a semi displacement hull design.
  4. Mov-it!

    Mov-it! New Member

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    Hi Maxlax,

    A semi-displacement does offer some advantages in this length. Although you will lack a couple of knots in topspeed, a semi displacement hull offers a wider stabile speed range. A planning hull gets its stability at planing speeds and is less comfortable and responsive at mild cruising speeds of, lets say, 10 knots. Since the aft of an SD hull's underwater ship is lower and wider than on a planning hull, the fuel capacity and fresh water capacity is also larger which is nice for long distance cruising.

    I expect that when you have a well designed SD hull in a similar length you could get up to 25 knots of topspeed and a range of about 1500 to 2000 nm at cruising speeds of 10 to 12 knots. This however depends on a lot of factors. Unfortunately most SD yachts in this class do not have the sleek and sporty looks of the planning yachts so I think there are not a lot of series SD yachts that fit this profile.

    I personally think that the Cyrus 33 is a nice alternative for sporty yachts.
    Although it looks very retro, it does have the classy presence of the 60's and 70's classics. I can't comment on their build quality. The yard is located in Turkey and managed by Vitters. I don't have the sales prices of Cyrus, but the price indications I have heard of are very competative. A lot "cheaper" than the Italians.

    In case you would go semi or full custom, you will get most probably get an aluminium yacht which will probably result in a lighter yacht. This will improve the performance as well.
  5. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    I think you better check this with Ferretti. In their brochure they had a predicted range of just 520 Nm and in a magazine review I was reading that the range was well over 700 Nm..

    Desirable for this kind of yachts is the latter, corresponding to the distance from Portofino to Palma if I recall it right.
  6. maxlax

    maxlax New Member

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    so if you slow down the speed will you be able to go farther
  7. Yachtguy

    Yachtguy New Member

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    I attached a link to a yacht that sounds very much like what you are looking for. Rayburn together with Ed Hagemann a Naval Architect in the Seattle washington area have focused on a Semi-Displacement hull form capable of higher speeds but equally as efficient at LRC speeds. The fundaments are SLR (Speed Length Ratio) and DLR (Displacement Length Ratio's). These two factors are the god's of hull performance of Semi-Displacement hull forms. The key then is to recognizing the boundaries of these two components and maximizing your hull design to suit them all the while not forgetting about the equally important factor of seakeeping and stability. Everything else you do or don't do including, engines, transmissions, exhaust, props, rudders, stabalizer fins, tunnels, keels, chines, bows and transoms and many more hull details in between are just small components that add up to make the difference between mediocre and GREAT!. This series of hull for it's intended purpose just may be one of the greats. You research and you decide I may be a little biased.

    Here is a link!

    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/newest-builds-launches/5975-rayburn-launches-new-92-kathleen-m.html?highlight=kathleen+m+rayburn
    The only part I don't agree with here is the reference to 9 knots cruise speed while they may have acheived that kind of range the engines are only running at less than 20% load poss closer to 10% they are not even warm and the turbo's are sleeping so the engine efficiency is poor. However talk to CAT and they will say as long as she is brought up to speed for say a half hour in 8 they should stay pretty clean. The fact is the slower you go the less fuel you will burn regardless of engine efficiency until you get to the point where your generators start eating into your fuel faster than you are travelling. An approx gen burn might be 1GPH and at 9 knots this hull might be burning about 1 nautical mile per gallon. You can see how the scale will eventually tip as the hull effiency will improve the slower you go but with deminishing gaines. It is a declining curve.

    Ed Monk Jr. and Jack Sarin both Naval architects in the Pacific North West (Washington USA) are also excellent sources of expertise in this nature of hull form with a lot of experience in the size you are talking about.

    FYI hull length will pretty much determine your speed range in the semi-displacement mode. If you regard the work by Captain Robert Beebe you will probably plan your cruising around SLR 1.1 (square root of waterline hull length multiply by the factor in this case 1.1) so for a vessel close to the length you described originally the waterline length was probably around 100' average of the two. So in this case that would be 11 knots voyage speed. One factor then would be ships generator service which will increase(gals or liter/mile(NM) at lower speeds. Commercial vessels and ships for efficiency will run even slower DLR's down in the .8-.9 country but when you have 1000' waterline thats still pretty fast. Anyway back to yachts. Beebe is pretty much a fundamentalist of true LRC's so much above hull speed and he will be cringing but if you don't mind spending a little more on fuel and uprfont cost on engines and shafts etc..you can have a yacht that can go fast or far with relative grace in either department. You can have your cake and eat it too!!!

    One of the books by Beebe

    Voyaging Under Power
    THIRD EDITION
    by Captain Robert P. Beebe

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