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Dreaming of long term Marina hopping...

Discussion in 'Marinas & Waypoints' started by Joe Deepwater, Jan 12, 2019.

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  1. Joe Deepwater

    Joe Deepwater Member

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    Yes, Maritimo is light and bright. Thanks!
  2. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Port
    Aquamarina Hidden Harbor
    PGA
    Harbourtowne
    Boathouse Pompano

    I believe all cover at least 42' and some go up to 50'.
  3. Joe Deepwater

    Joe Deepwater Member

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    Where do you put your boat during hurricanes?
  4. Joe Deepwater

    Joe Deepwater Member

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    I assume you mean sunk. Is there an easy test for that (other than paying an inspector)?
  5. captainwjm

    captainwjm Senior member

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    We live aboard full time and our permanent slip is here in the Keys. So we have to consider the logistics of finding an available location in short order in advance of any storm versus staying put. Due to the size of the storm, and the changing predicted path, we decided the best course of action was to leave the boat at Plantation Yacht Harbor in Islamarada for Irma, while we evacuated by car. No damage to our boat and no more than minor damage to others as the storm’s impact was across the island oceanside. For Matthew, before we became permanent at PYH, we were caught comming down the east coast as the storm chnaged from a predicted south Fla. landfall to a run up the coast, and holed up in New Smyrna Beach. Again we left the boat and evacuated inland. Only minor damage there. Since we’re always with the boat, we can make decisions on an ad hoc basis. Our insurance knows we’ll most likely stay here, if we are not cruising. The main thing is that we take action to be safe and hope that we leave the boat secured as well as possible before leaving. After that its hope for the best and be thankful for good insurance.
  6. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    Indeed each hurricane is different. It all depends on which side you re going to be in. Irma was a worst case scenario because it came from the south leaving very few options. In SoFL with the more typical atlantic storms coming from the east, like Andrews, you really only have to move 75 miles or so to be out of the dangerous core. Nowadays at 3 days, the NHC has the bullseye pretty much accurately painted...

    For irma, it originally looked like running to the west coast was going to be the best option untill 4 days before when NHC started shifting the forecast west. I had dockage lined up in Tampa but ended up going east to a hurricane hole in Eleuthera when it was clear the storm was going to go uo the west coast. Our home marina took a beating with dozens of boats sunk or totalled

    Some marinas offer good protection all around, many dont. It can get tricky...
  7. Joe Deepwater

    Joe Deepwater Member

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    I know a homeowner in Marathon whose 30 foot cruiser blew off its lift on his canal home during Irma and fishermen found it out at sea in decent shape 2 weeks later. I'm sure this is a dumb question, but does anyone drive several miles out and abandon their boat with an epirb on board before a hurricane? There are still Japanese boats from the tsunami floating after years. Drop anchor with a long rode to keep the bow pointed into the headwinds? Is this a legitimate option? I know, dumb question...
  8. ranger42c

    ranger42c Senior member

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    To accomplish what? Save the boat, in some way better than hauling/blocking on high-ish ground might... or in some way better than moving the boat out of a hurricane's path might... or in some way better than anchoring appropriately in a known hurricane hole might... or in some way better than a good tie-up at known-to-be-well-designed/built docks might?

    -Chris
  9. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    On the way back from Eleuthera 3 days after Irma we can upon a 30’ sailboat in the gulfstream about 20miles our. It was afloat so we took it under tow... after 5 or 6 miles the line parted and by then it was too rough to get back aboard and secure another line so we let it go. As soon as we got internet I found the owners name in the USCG DB and then found the guy on Facebook (sorry Carl ) Messaged him and he was able to get seatow to pick it up the next day off Port Everglades (20+ miles from where it got loose). Turned out the boat was moored in the keys and got loose.

    Activating an Epirb without an emergency would be illegal but putting in a Spot would be one way to ensure the boat is found after the storm. If afloat.
  10. Joe Deepwater

    Joe Deepwater Member

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    I know nothing about hurricane prep for a yacht. I would think that the greatest damage is the repetition of a hull bashing against it's piling if 1 or 2 lines fail, or if the lines hold too well and the swell sinks the boat. Am I wrong? I would think there would be a scarcity of captains and space to put yachts in an unpredictable storm path, with lots of responses like "maybe I can squeeze you in but its' going to cost you." I would be an absentee owner living up north. Is blocking a yacht a reliable solution? I would think there is a very good chance of the yacht being blown over and cracking the hull. Is there an advanced blocking technique for hurricanes? Sorry for the stupid questions, but it just seems that dropping anchor a few miles out with nothing to hit and letting the bilges do their job might be a solution. Is there such a thing as a heavy duty bungee coil spring for an anchor line to absorb the shock load of a storm? Again, sorry for the stupid questions.
  11. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    Most insurance companies will share the cost of hauling (mega yachts excluded). Part of your hurricane plan should be a prearranged haul with your yard. Many maintain a "haul" list. If you wait until 5 days before the storm, you get what you get....

    The storm surge and higher than normal tides can impale a boat on its pilings.
  12. ranger42c

    ranger42c Senior member

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    Not dumb question st all, Joe... and it's certainly one of the issues you'll want to understand before FL happens for you. :)

    Wouldn't be bad to start another thread about hurricane prep, perhaps first after searching on "hurricane prep" here and reviewing existing threads.

    The short version is that "it depends" on several factors: the boat, the area, available facilities, the specific hurricane, etc. Yes, hauling/blocking can be very effective, if done right (high ground, tether lines anchored in the tarmac or whatever, etc.). Good (sturdy) boatels can be very effective. Moving a boat out of the hurricane path can be effective, either yourself or a hired captain. Even just picking good home docks can be effective (well-built floating docks with really TALL piles, etc.). WHICH of those depends. And the idea in someplace like FL is to get all that basically decided/in place in advance. (Your insurance company would likely want that, anyway.)

    Setting a boat loose in hopes in might survive... not so much. Especially since the hurricane that you're trying to mitigate for is on a path toward land. Also not so great to scatter obstacles (like boats) around, give anyone the impression life and limb is at stake, etc.

    Sometimes it just helps to get local knowledge from folks in your area.

    -Chris
  13. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    Here in Miami if you want a guaranteed haul out spot at a yard during hurricane season it s going to cost you between $5000 and $10000 up front when the season starts. The good yards dona good job of blocking boats but result vary depending on locations exposure etc. bottom line there aren’t enough yards to haul boats...

    And you still have to worry about flying debris, utility poles or trees, etc.

    Some marinas fared better than others in past hurricanes, it depends on the docks and locations. Also depends on how wide a fixed slip is. If you only have two feet on each side of the boat, the stretching of the lines alone will result in the boat rubbing on the pilings.
  14. Joe Deepwater

    Joe Deepwater Member

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    $5-10K per year? Or is that only debited upon haul out, if needed, and rolled over to the next year if unused?
  15. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    So if you are a regular customer in Florida marina, you need to deposit $5-10K in case of a storm haul? And what do they do with that deposit in the meantime? Hope it's in an interest bearing trust account at least. Another reason for me not to be in F
    BTW, I agree that there are a thousand variables to the question. Mine comment was really about my own storm plan.
  16. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    No... it is non refundable. You pay up front and are guaranteed a haul out anytime there is a hurricane warning. Most marinas in SoFl are just that, marinas. Not yards. Even those that have a travel lift are operated separately and having a slip doesn’t mean you get hurricane haul out
  17. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Most people in South Florida don't get haul outs, just stay docked where they normally dock. No capacity for anything more.
  18. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    Wow, that's brutal. I suppose not many folks make that investment. Here in the NE many marinas have yards so I guess that makes some of the difference. My insurance has a specific provision to pay half the cost of a haul out....

    Again, depending on all the circumstances a haul out may or not be a good choice. Fortunately, the marina we stay at has very good dock, piers and pilings so I have the option of staying in. In fact, since I winter in the water, we've successfully been thru a number of nor'eaters in our 19 years.
  19. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    yeah, "no yard facilities" explains a lot

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