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Diesel 6-71

Discussion in 'Engines' started by Milka, May 7, 2020.

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  1. Oscarvan

    Oscarvan Senior Member

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    Fair enough.....

    Just remembered this one.... you need to get a hold of this guy....

    "Bus Grease Monkey". He messes with, and helps people that have the equally dreaded "restore an old MCI bus into a motorhome" disease. They all have DD's in the back. He's VERY good, and seems to be in it for the love and not so much for the money. He's actually done a few boat motors too..... There's a LOT of videos. Watch a few and you'll get the idea.

  2. Milka

    Milka New Member

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    Good videos.
  3. Milka

    Milka New Member

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    Shaft turns freely.
    Blower motor runs.
    Batteries are great.
    Starter/solenoid pulled for rebuilt tomorrow.
  4. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

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    Can you move the crank shaft at the front pulley?
  5. Lepke

    Lepke Member

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    The governor speed control lever, pushed to the left will stop the engine. Most have a solenoid mounted so it can be done remotely with a button. If the engine has been sitting a long time, it's a good idea to pull the valve cover and work the injectors to make sure none are frozen. Disconnect the linkage at the back of the governor to move the rack by hand.
    The serial can be found on the exhaust side, at the front top of the block.
    I've been running Detroits for about 60 years. I can't remember one ever frozen from sitting out of the weather. If you need a mechanic, get one with Detroit experience. The others will just screw up the engine.
    Fuel flows all the time in a loop, from the tank, to the secondary filter (mounted on the engine), thru the injectors, and back to the tank. Natural (non-turbo) engines pump about 35 gallons an hour (depending on the model). The extra fuel cools the injector tips between injections and warms the fuel (for better burning).
    You don't have to bleed a Detroit fuel system, just establish a flow. If it was my engine, I'd get some fresh fuel and a electric pump and circulate it thru the engine before trying to start. Also do your first try in the afternoon of a warm day. Open the hatch if the sun can hit it. Or if the engine has a block heater, plug it in for an hour or so. A diesel fires when the compressed air in the cylinder raises the temp above about 500°F. (Air gets hot when you compress it) So a cold sitting engine can be hard to start. The rings will compress a little from sitting and cold my not raise the pressure enough for ignition temperature.
    Make sure the seacock is open to the salt water pump. Once started, feel the hose going to the pump for circulation. It will feel colder.
    You should check the impeller for cracks and wear. Also check the engine zincs. There should be one at the salt water pump and two in the heat exchanger. New ones are cheap on line.
    Good Luck.

    Attached Files:

  6. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    You did see from the pics he was keeled cooled.
    A star gear pump sometimes needs some help in priming, That is why I suggested opening the last injector tube. While there, checking the rack for any stuck injectors.
  7. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    I can not fly in without my tools. My heavy crew is working in Port Canaveral for a long while.
    I do hate Norfolk.
    Lets get that starter back on and ensure the main will go over and build oil pressure.
    It may just take a bit to get her running.
    If more problems or if you can not find a local tech, I can be there in two weeks by van. I'll sneak in and my name is John if anybody ask.
    Lets ensure it spins and some other things before we get that desperate.

    Did I ever tell you; I do hate Norfolk.
    Last edited: May 15, 2020
  8. Milka

    Milka New Member

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    2 steps forward and 1 back
    Batteries Tested good and fully charged
    Batteries put under a load point to they are shot.

    Starter and solenoid i was told would be astronomical to rebuild so I bought a new and improved model.

    Capt Ralph not sure i could afford you coming for a visit... sry it's Norfolk but as soon as I can she will be further south.
  9. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Come on down.
  10. Milka

    Milka New Member

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    New starter solenoid will not work for some reason.

    Old one starts right up but solenoid is still crap on it. Part number 09085843
  11. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Send some pics.
    Most big starters and solenoids are ground isolated and need their own Battery-Negative straps.
  12. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Got your pictures. One was just the side of the engine. The second pic does show you have an isolated ground starter.
    Get me a few more pics of all the contacts on the solenoid and I'll draw up a schematic.
    Don't just start clamping wires on, lets take our time and try to get it correct the first (couple) of tries..:rolleyes::rolleyes:

    Lets also try to find that model & serial number. Need to ensure the starter spins in the correct direction.
    Check post #45 above.
    20200517_154838a.jpg
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
  13. Milka

    Milka New Member

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    I've been told the boat itself has a solenoid... will take photos in the morning before taking both original and new starter and solenoids back to the shop... old part has had a paint job
  14. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Hey Lepke
    Your pic in #45 is the throttle to governor connection, not the governor shut down connect.
    I do have a feeling that the idle screw has been backed out so far and when the throttle is pulled way back, the engine does die.
    This is not the preferred way but we start working with what we have.
  15. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    It could. But on that big stud I see in the pic. Your already strapped wrong.
    I'm trying to retire. Don't call early but call when you get to the boat. I'll have my phone close (if I can find it tonight and charge it). If I miss you, I'll call you back.
    ,Ralph
  16. Milka

    Milka New Member

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    I live on the boat :confused: will text you some pictures in the morning ty.

    On the new part I was told specifically that nub on the end was different then the original part and they made the new part have negative on the end of the starter instead of positive.
  17. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    That stud in the pic should be battery negative.
    I need to see the solenoid to figure the connects to it.

    On my boat, there is a Delco in-term solenoid. The thought is a real heavy B+ current does not have to travel from the engine to the helm, then back down to the starter. A smaller current is needed up and down to this remote solenoid (If you really have one), then, this gives a solid bang of voltage to the solenoid mounted on the starter.
    Like a jig saw puzzle, we will figure it out.
  18. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

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    Perhaps grab a starter button and wire everything direct, bypass the boat systems to remove other variables?
  19. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Yep, The later starter motor.
    The negative battery strap goes on that post on the back of the starter. The positive strap goes to the top post on the solenoid.
    Wire with yellow strips is your engage wire, to the starter switch, starter button or in-term solenoid's out-put post.

    I think you may have to ad a second negative strap from the starter (B-) to the block if the block has been used for a common negative path for senders and grounds to other options.

    Next concern, It may just be the angle of the camera, Are the starter noises the same length? The older starter looks like it may have a longer reach inside the bell housing, Typical of a Allison wet flywheel.

    Resized_received_845673362590021a.jpg received_171519820921125a.jpg
  20. Milka

    Milka New Member

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    Newer one works.
    Flywheel moves so motor is not seized.
    No rebuild on old Solenoid as they can't find parts.

    Next step is batteries I believe