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Coupes off the Marquis Site

Discussion in 'Marquis Yacht' started by regnatarajan, Jul 10, 2014.

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  1. regnatarajan

    regnatarajan Guest

    I've been lurking here. Never posted before, but there's always a first time. I just noticed the coupes are off the Marquis website. Anyone know if these are no longer available? They used to have a 42 and 50 coupe (no flybridge) if I recall correctly, but they're nowhere to be seen on the site now. That's the style I'm interested in. Here's a screenshot of the current model offering on their website. All flybridge yachts (aside from the 72 which is out of my size and price range).

    Attached Files:

  2. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Looking a step further, consider Carver and Marquis and you'll see the lines have been reduced to 4 models for Carver and 5 for Marquis and really the 72 bridge and tri are variations of the same model. Obvious streamlining and I think a clear indication they don't have the volume to justify the lines. Manufacturing space has been used for non boat building and they've taken on potential building for Van Dutch.

    They build in what has been one of the weakest size ranges in the market, 34' to 72'. All but the 66 and 72 are 54' or smaller. 34' to 54' has been a very depressed market. They're also competing with Sea Ray which dwarfs them in volume and in financial backing. However, Sea Ray pulled back considerably in that range and has just now started to move back up in size. I would say as well Coupes probably were a very small percentage of their business.

    One additional note. The President/CEO of Marquis did recently retire and has now been replaced through them moving the President/CEO of Larson (same ownership) into the position.
  3. regnatarajan

    regnatarajan Guest

    I wasn't aware that size range (34'-54') was depressed. Figures, that's the exact size range I'm interested in and I don't see that changing anytime soon. There are a lot of good used deals out there. That's probably the way to go, although there aren't a lot of coupes in the used market.
  4. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    That just happened to be the area most hit by the economic crisis and slowest to recover. People bought smaller, especially outboards. And the 80' and up business recovered a bit faster. But in the 34-54' range people chose the used market or to not buy at all. That doesn't mean there aren't some fine boats in that range. But most are in trawler or flybridge form. In coupe form, you have Sea Ray, then you have several European models such as Sunseeker, Riva, Pershing. It's a great size boat for many, just one hit hard by economics and one Marquis has not had the volume in they would have hoped.

    At one time you had them pushing the Carver and Marquis lines and in some sizes the two even competing with each other. Now you have it being treated more as a combined line with two distinct styles. You had the Genmar bankruptcy in 2009 and it was early 2010 before Platinum bought most brands and Jacobs ended up with Carver, Marquis, Larson, Seaswirl, Fincraft and Triumph. Carver and Marquis have never fully recovered.
  5. regnatarajan

    regnatarajan Guest

    You seem to know a lot about this. What do you think of Tiara? I might just try a used one and, if I like it, build my dream boat in Holland, MI. My dream boat won't impress anyone here as it'll probably be 50' or less. lol. Money is a consideration but even setting that aside, I just don't like boats I can't handle without crew.
  6. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Well, I've never been on a Tiara and not sure I've ever seen one in person, so don't know much. As to evaluating a boat for you, I don't know what your intended use is or your needs and desires. There are many great boats but the key is finding the one right for you. For instance, you seem bothered by the loss of the Marquis Coupes, but in many ways that reflects that more people in that range are purchasing bridges. If the Marquis coupes appealed to you then Sea Ray Sundancers might very well. But if your use is a large family or longer cruises both might be a bit tight. Can just not ever recommend a boat without knowing what it's to be used for.
  7. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Tiara's are a touch on the wet side. BUT, they are a well built and solid boat. They also ride pretty good.
  8. Old Phart

    Old Phart Senior Member

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    I dunno
    Welcome.


    Not being one that enjoys side sliding to read posts,

    would you be so kind as to limit the pixel width of your post to 600, please.


    P.S.- 1012 is a bit excessive.
  9. revluc

    revluc Member

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    This is a very good concise answer, spot on.

    On our second Tiara: first was a 29' Open with gas engines and hardtop, now a 32' Open diesel with hardtop and strongly considering moving up to a 38' Open (get out of the 2' at a time rut).

    The 29' was/is a wet boat. The 32' is a touch on the wet side like Capt J said. Haven't run anything bigger than the 32' yet so can't comment on those sizes/models.

    They are solidly built, we have had very few problems and run the boat just over 100hrs/year and not in the offseason but it is captain maintained when out of town.

    Have you considered something like a Sabre/Back Cove? I know that is a different exterior look, but a closer layout and one of the brands we cross shop.
  10. regnatarajan

    regnatarajan Guest

    Sorry about that. I doubt I could've shown what I was trying to show with further cropping, though. Resizing would've made the text hard to read. I'll certainly try to keep the image sizes down in the future, although I don't anticipate posting many images.

    So I understand you, do you mean "wet" as in "spray reaching the people on board"?

    I'm actually thinking of taking a similar path. Perhaps get a 31-33' used one and see if I like it. If I do, get them to build me one of their coupes, probably the 44 as the 50 doesn't appear to have anything over the 44 for my uses and, as I've mentioned, money is a very real consideration to me.

    I have looked at Sabre/Back Cove and they look to my layman's eye to be a high quality boat, but the style just doesn't move me. Really, I thought the Marquis coupes were the best looking boats I've yet seen in that size range and I'm going through a bit of a midlife crisis so I want a sexy boat. lol.

    [​IMG]

    I also really hate canvas and the coupe style some makers are pushing these days allows for a nearly canvas-free boat, even in winter. Just tie up, lock the door and walk away when you dock.
  11. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I ran a Marquis exactly like the one you show in the photo. Build quality left little to be admired. The interior was very stylish and looked good. However, the quality of the interior was not, many items fell apart cabinet hinges furnishings glued on the dash etc.......the exterior quality wasn't impressive either.....week hinges and things like that....... The Hull had A LOT of print through, and it was not a great riding boat......

    What about a 40' Cabo HTX with no tower or anything? 32+ knot cruise, solid ride, solid build, solid handling, glass windows fiberglass hardtop and a/c.
  12. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    Never seen a Tiara? If a person has spent any time at all on the water I think that would be almost impossible.

    I think a builders consolidation of models, particularly the elimination of smaller ones is often a case of smaller boats equals smaller profits.
  13. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Sure I've probably seen some, maybe many, but not known I was looking at one. I've not found myself docked beside one at a marina. Until two years ago was on NC lake. Still haven't boated on Great Lakes where they are big or California, where you are. I do know there are a lot in Florida but also was not a size and type I was looking at as a buyer. Now, I'm going to have to look more carefully when back home. Don't think I'll probably see any in Alaska where I am right now.

    You're right on the elimination of smaller models but in this case Marquis and Carver have just cut the line. And in general that size range was hit hardest in demand. It's very difficult to keep brands going through a bankruptcy and especially when the market is at it's lowest as when Marquis and Carver were hit. Carver I've seen tons of. Now Marquis, not nearly as many but can't miss one when you do as they're so distinctive.
  14. regnatarajan

    regnatarajan Guest

    I really appreciate the input. Unfortunately, Cabos don't move me any. I'm sure they're very well built but they look about the same as 80s convertibles to me. I don't fish at all.

    I begin to think my criteria for boat selection is very different from others here. I'll try to explain myself. Boating is an emotional thing for me. I really don't need a boat. I want one. I won't be taking it out in any hurricanes. Really, I'll putt around Vancouver once a week and maybe take it over to Vancouver Island for a weekend once a month in summer. I'll talk about taking it to Alaska some summer and then never do it, just like all the other boat owners around here.

    I know this will mark me as a twit to some but I'm not sure I care about whether a boat is well built. I've driven some pretty good cars over the years. Usually German, superbly engineered, extremely reliable. The other year, I bought an old convertible that, while also German, was badly engineered and flaky. It's a crap shoot whether it starts and I have to have another car handy in case it doesn't. I don't care. I love it. It's the most fun I've ever had on wheels. It has stranded me in odd places several times and I forgive it each time, not unlike some women I've also loved. It makes me feel young again. I'm hoping to have that much fun on the water.

    My two years of boat ownership have been a frustrating exercise in learning that I'm really not a sailor, that I hate projects, and that it's cheaper in the end to just buy what you want. Armed with this new knowledge, I am pretty determined to end up with a boat that makes me say "wow" whenever I walk up to it on the dock. So far, the only boats I've found that do that are the Marquis Coupes and a couple of Rivas. Everyone will have their own "wow" boats. Those are mine so far.

    I don't mind if getting there requires me to try a smaller used model of whatever I'm thinking of getting for a season before I buy my dream boat. That actually seems like a good approach to me. Unfortunately, there are no smaller Marquis to try out for a season that way. It would work for Tiara, though, although their coupes just don't move me the way the Marquis coupes did. It's moot if Marquis isn't making them anymore, though.

    I think my approach will be to surf Yachtworld for the next year and, when something screams out "buy me", I'll jump on a plane and go see it. It's an impractical and emotional way to do it, but it seems as good a way as any to me.
  15. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    We own Rivas and love them for what they are. Great for a couple on a weekend. Not for cruising for months at a time. Great for speed, not for economy. Range could be a factor in some situations. Riva Vertigo 63' for instance, 1000 rpm 11 knots 25 gph, 1500 rpm 21 knots 58 gph, 2000 rpm 35 knots 105 gph, 2300 rpm 40 knots 137 gph. Range at wot 220 nm, at cruise 260 nm.

    Sunseeker is popular among people seeking similar boats. Nothing wrong with what you want, just be sure you're focusing in on your primary uses and not what looks exciting to you.
  16. revluc

    revluc Member

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    We have never had an issue of spray reaching the cockpit and only running the wipers some in medium seas to keep the windscreen clean to keep an eye out for crab pots (south FL, Gulf Coast). Throttling back makes it an almost non-issue, we cruise at 28 MPH, burning 24 GPH (total).

    A used Tiara probably isn't the style you are interested in based on your posts, BUT they are moving/offering new models in a style that is your taste, less mine which is fine. IF their build quality is the same, as they have built their reputation on, with the new models I think Tiara could be a good option for your kind of use.

    Sounds like your are looking for a "euro" coupe style and IPS style handling. It has been my experience that if you spend less on quality upfront you will pay for it in nuisances repairs and down time.
  17. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I certainly would make quality an issue. If everytime you use your boat and something breaks and it makes for an unhappy boating experience, than what good is that? What about Formula? They're a quality boat and make IPS models? Searay also makes a 45' zues boat. Sunseeker?
  18. regnatarajan

    regnatarajan Guest

    I'm actually coming around to Tiara. Give me time. lol.
  19. regnatarajan

    regnatarajan Guest

    What do you guys think of Azimut?
  20. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I own a Yacht Management Business and have a love/hate relationship with Azimuts. Parts can be hard to source, quality is average, many things break. So if I'm managing an Azimut, there are always plenty of things to fix. They run/ride nice, but the engineering leaves a lot to be desired, and many times you're fixing the same problem over and over and over because of the way the boat is built/engineered.

    They also don't like to warranty anything. I buy a $1800 fresh water pump from their dealer. It arrived with a broken pressure gauge and looks like it well had been banged around a bit. 90 days later, it goes bad and won't pump water. I call the dealer as well as Azimut North America and they only warranty parts for 30 days. So I end up putting in a $2100 Headhunter unit (24volts so I had to stick with headhunter for the volume) with the expansion tank, pressure regulator etc. that's warrantied for 2 years. Which I would've done earlier, if the owners didn't need the water pump right now.

    I personally would never own one.