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Caution: Rough Seas Ahead

Discussion in 'Popular Yacht Topics' started by PropBet, Mar 3, 2009.

  1. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    In the two photos further up on this page of the freighter carrying the cruiseship lifeboats, they might have had to use those themselves to get off had the vessel capsized;)
  2. YachtForums

    YachtForums Administrator

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  3. Loren Schweizer

    Loren Schweizer YF Associate Writer

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    Lunchtime! Lessee...we got cream cheese & sardine sandwiches, cold, greasy pork chops, and hot strawberry milkshakes to wash it all down with.
  4. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    What's the problem with that. That's a fishing boat and you've got a good recipe for chum when it comes back up.:eek:
  5. PropBet

    PropBet Senior Member

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    Typical super yacht charter lunch menu, yes?
  6. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

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  7. simmikie

    simmikie New Member

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    yes, while i know next to nothing about this, i was wondering if that ship should have had a more head-on angle to that wave.

    this also leads me to a series of seriously newb questions.

    1) for those levels of sea states, would a Nordhavn be capable of surviving those conditions?

    2) are there passenger (charter/private) yacht sizes that should definitely not be 'steaming' in those conditions?

    3) is it ever justifiable for a skipper of a private/charter vessel to be caught in those conditions (i did see that small sailboat out there in one of the pics)?

    in my US Naval Days i have been in those type of conditions, with water over the gun mount..etc. but manufacturers of trawlers like Nordhavn in essence state, anywhere, anytime, and i just wonder if they mean this?

    Mike
  8. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    I don't care how big your boat, the ocean can always get bigger. As for charter boats, they get caught out just like cruise ships, etc. but doubt if they'd be anywhere near 90' seas. If so, doubt they'd be counting on a big tip. My question though is: what were the plane and the helicopter doing on the flight deck in those conditions?
  9. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

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    naaa i don't think so, i mean there's a helicopter aboard and a couple of planes, but how should there anybody start? not speaking of landing
  10. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Your post lost a few words there, but that plane and helo should be below deck where they can't get washed overboard. That's what, about $60m sitting there.
  11. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

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    as far as i know, they're pretty good tied on the deck, and i suppose those just there for the reason, that the hangar might've been full. but even if not, i don't think the navy would run that ship in that storm if they wouldn't be sure about the planes and stuff.
  12. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    You're talking about the same people who buy million dollar toilet seats.:rolleyes:
  13. simmikie

    simmikie New Member

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    well secured is one thing, but those craft are being subjected to potential damage. put another way, i would not want to be put on the catapult with that aircraft.

    not being a carrier sailor, i would still say that carriers generally don't carry more aircraft than they can stow, which is why they have mission specific aircraft configurations.

    Mike
  14. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

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    hm, yeah, right... i guess there's something wrong with those guys *hrhrhr*
  15. wildkactus

    wildkactus New Member

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    I guess it could be a salt spray corrosion test or water ingress test!!!!

    anyway I would not like to be the next flight crew.
  16. Natalie

    Natalie New Member

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    That was my thought as well.
  17. YachtForums

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  18. wscott52

    wscott52 Senior Member

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  19. JB1150

    JB1150 New Member

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    I know it a little late but this is a description posted with the video on a Military Strategy web page.:

    This carrier is 90,000 ton. Imagine what this is like on a 2,200 ton destroyer? The aircraft seen in the attached video is a helo from a deployed helicopter squadron (HS-14) based at the U.S. Naval Air Facility in Atsugi , Japan . The carrier is the USS Kitty Hawk, based in Yokosuka , Japan . The "Hawk" was underway for CQ (Airwing Carrier Qualifications) in the Sea of Japan during the week of March 22, 2008.

    The chopper seen on the ship's bow, tied down at helo Spot 2, is a Sikorsky SH-60F from HS-14. The pilot had just landed on deck, and his helo was tied down on Spot 2 because the seas were too rough to move it to a safer place. Fortunately, it only suffered some minor damage (blade crutch support socket) and a lot of salt water intrusion from the sea...

    While viewing the video and estimating the size of the waves, keep in mind that the carrier's flight deck is approximately 60' above the ship's normal water line.
  20. CTdave

    CTdave Senior Member

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