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Canadian Regulations Question

Discussion in 'Licensing & Education' started by Donut, Sep 20, 2009.

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  1. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    The 24m comes from post 11. I read just fine although maybe, specifically for your benefit, I should have said 24m PLUS. I think most half-way intelligent and less picayune readers understood that my question was not relating to size, but was asking (and not stating) if he was referring to sail since he used that phrase. Although you "sailed" on a submarine most of us "cruise" on cruisers and motoryachts. Now maybe you should try giving DONUT the specific answer to the question he is asking since you know all. That's as much time as I'm wasting on you in this thread.
  2. 'RoundTheHorn

    'RoundTheHorn Senior Member

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    Marmot,
    Thank you ever so much for correcting me. I forgot that the two are not interchangeable or even directly related. I do indeed recall that there is a difference now that you have reminded me. My experience is more in the smaller yacht range and I tend to think more in terms of the weight of the vessel and whether or not the Travelift® can handle the load without collapsing or dropping the hull.
  3. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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    I don't think so, cap. The man used 24m because that is the regulatory cutoff between little boats and "large yachts." It is where the Large Yacht Code comes into effect. It is a critical waypoint in the path to certification (licensing) of yacht crew.

    Like I said, there are books about this sort of thing if you want to learn something about the kind of boats the original poster is talking about.

    I think Donut got a very specific answer to his question. He got a reference to the relevent document published by the organization that issues the license he seeks, and a suggestion that he contact them directly to obtain an official response.
  4. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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    [QUOTE='roundthehorn]I tend to think more in terms of the weight of the vessel and whether or not the Travelift® can handle the load without collapsing or dropping the hull.[/QUOTE]

    Which is far more important to most of us than what makes the tax collector's world go 'round. :)
  5. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    [QUOTE='roundthehorn]FYI...From the Nordhavn site -- http://www.nordhavn.com

    N68 Displacement: 230,000 lbs./104.3 MT
    N72 Displacement: 240,000 lbs./108.8 MT
    N76 Displacement: 252,000 lbs./114.3 MT
    N86 Displacement: 400,000 lbs./181.4 MT[/QUOTE]

    Gross Tons is a measurement based on interior volume of the vessel and some other calculations. It has NOTHING to do with actual displacement.
  6. 'RoundTheHorn

    'RoundTheHorn Senior Member

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    Thanks again, CaptJ. Got it. As indicated above, my memory got that jumpstart after Marmot reminded me.
  7. Donut

    Donut New Member

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    Sorry i haven't got back and thanked you guys for all the help. Work has been increasingly insane but the money is flowing in so i can't really complain...but i still do anyway hahaha.

    Anyway, i have a few other questions. This might not be the right section but i don't wanna start another thread and clutter things up.

    1) Anyone have experience and/or opinions regarding the Pershing 88? Also remember it will be 5-10yrs old on top of what it is today when i get around to Yacht shopping.

    2) Can a Pershing 88 be operated without a crew? Meaning it would be crewed by me and Wife/Girlfriend/Family. I am not afraid of maintaining (maintenance) or waxing/washing my boat on vacation.
  8. Donut

    Donut New Member

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  9. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Used to run a 60 Pred. Fun boat! Garners a lot of attention. We did many weekends with 5 & 6 people and were comfortable. About 106gph at about 30kts. with 1050 Mans. She handled well except in a head sea. 7' emptied the fridges and sent us to the inside. The boat can be handled easily by one or two people. The machinery has pretty good accessability. The exhaust elbows rusted out in the 3rd year. Otherwise few problems while I was with her.
  10. Donut

    Donut New Member

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    Would you recommend one long term? The 2010 60 Pred is what i have my eye on from Sunseeker. I know when the time comes i will be buying used. I can afford new but i don't need new (if that makes any sense ).
  11. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Make sense? That's just smart. The fellow I ran for had an '01 or '02 if I remember correctly. He bought it 1 season old with about 50 hours, saved major bucks and got a boat that was broken in. It was his first boat. I taught him and ran with him for 2 years including a run to Miami. He still has it. Since my time with him he runs it himself with family or a friend.
  12. Donut

    Donut New Member

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    Does anyone know what the GT (volume) is on the 60' Sunseeker? I'm guessing somewhere in the range of 100GT.
  13. Donut

    Donut New Member

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    Just realized the Pershing 88 is over 24m (duh) so the 88 is a no go. The Azimut 68S looks like a good boat for a short handed crew. The bow and stern thrusters with maneuvering joystick seems like it would make docking a lot easier. Any opinions on Azimut?

    Again, thanks for all the help. Very much appreciated :cool:
  14. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    DK the GT for the 60 Pred, but it should be considerably under 100GT. Don't count on bow & stern thrusters. That's amature time. The trick to single handing is not getting into the dock; it's in handling the boat while hooking up the lines (being 2 places at the same time while the boat may be trying to move away via wind/current). You can get a wireless Yachtcontroller. The 68 is probably Azimmuts biggest seller. Personally I don't like Azimuts, but use the search function here and you'll find plenty of opinions with specifics.
  15. Donut

    Donut New Member

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    Seems like the Azimut's are bit pissy. Typical for anything Italian lol.


    I have a question regarding the Yachtmaster Oceans: Certificate of Competency. It says for the offshore test, "600nm non-stop by the most direct navigational route" using my own vessel. Does this mean using a boat like a Sunseeker, Azimut or something similar is out of the question? Those boats get in the range of 300nm on a tank i believe. Would i have to charter a larger boat with a sufficient fuel supply?

    I want a Pershing 88 which means I'd need the CoC. I don't know why but something about the 88 appeals over everything else i am looking at. It's extra work in the licensing process if i wanted the 88 but i think the extra experience would pay off.
  16. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Ahem! My wife's Italian.:rolleyes: Then again she too has her moments.:D DK about the Canadian licensing regs, but from what you described in post #1 wouldn't you be looking for an inland or near-coastal license, and have you made it clear in your questions to T.C. that this boat is for personal use? BTW, 88 is a big boat. Do you have that kind of experience running and maintaining? I recently checked over that 60 I used to take care of and was very disappointed with how the engine room was maintained. These are complicated machines.
  17. Donut

    Donut New Member

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    T.C. doesn't seem all that interested in Large Yachts. The lady on the phone pretty much said anything over 12 meters (Canadian Yachting Association Powerboat Certificate 8-12 meters) gets complicated. She wasn't very helpful. But living on the Border of Michigan and Ontario, Canada i have the option of Registering the boat in Michigan ($448.00 a yr) and keeping it there year round. So i would be piloting it in US waters and getting the RYA/MCA Yachtmaster from MPT in Florida (when i have the seatime). No Citizenship Requirements for RYA/MCA Yachtmaster. No citizenship requirements for state registration either. The Marina on the Michigan side of town can accommodate vessels up to 100' ft. I have a few options for storage in the winter.

    All this might change. But as of now i pretty sure all this is legal and makes sense. But Yachting regs are a mess of information for a beginner so misunderstanders are gonna happen along the way. Way i see it i will do most of my boating in US waters anyone so i might as well save myself a few headaches and keep it across the border. It's only a 10 minute drive so i think i can manage lol.

    As for the experience, I wanna iron out all the bs before i start logging in seatime and gaining experience. When the time comes that i purchase a yacht i will be properly certified and experienced. I will be taking marine diesel courses before i buy a yacht as well. I plan on doing this properly, just a matter of what properly is gonna be (What sorta Experience i need).
  18. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    A diesel course is a beautiful thing, but that's only a small portion of what you'll be dealing with. I generally describe the systems on a boat like those mentioned as equivilant to (2) tractor trailers plus a small apartment building. Electrical ac/dc 12 & 24V, plumbing, a/c, electronics, bilge pumps, Jabsco pumps, generators, and the list goes on. Spend some time crawling around several bilges. See how several mfgs lay out their boats. Go past the pretty to the guts.
  19. Donut

    Donut New Member

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    You are right the RYA Coastal Skipper: Certificate Of Competency is the certificate i am after. "MCA Recognised and valid per MCA Manning Scale to serve as Chief Mate on Yachts up to 200gt / 150 miles offshore or 500gt / 60miles offshore when commercially endorsed". I am guessing over 24 meters as well because its CoC.
  20. Donut

    Donut New Member

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    http://www.rya.org.uk/newsevents/news/Pages/CoastalSkipperbecomesYachtmasterCoastal.aspx

    Or Yachtmaster Coastal effective January 1st, 2010.