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Cabo Express Electrolysis

Discussion in 'Cabo Yacht' started by BillManthorne, Nov 11, 2014.

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  1. CSkipR

    CSkipR Member

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    On my Cabo 43 the ac pump is 240v and the fresh water pump located under the galley is 120v. The fresh water pump is plugged into a 120v receptacle under the galley. The 240v ac pump is hard wired. Hope this helps sorry been away.
  2. CSkipR

    CSkipR Member

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    Bill,
    I have 2.5" shaft zincs on my shafts although I was told they were not necessary after installation. Will probably not replace when they have deteriorated.
    Skip
  3. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    That's a very good link. I wonder why they only make them in 20' lengths. Even the WM one has a 20' length but then you can purchase a 20' extension or multiple ones for it.
  4. BillManthorne

    BillManthorne Member

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    Thanks for the info. Is your ac pump break switch on your panel a double or just one switch? Mine is just a single breaker. I'm having the marina check the voltage on the breaker and I'm still waiting for the electrician to call me...
  5. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    What part of the panel is it on. Each section of the panel should be labeled at the top of it as to it's voltage.
  6. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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    That's a very good question. I have never noticed it before but will spend some time trying to find out. I can't think of any electrical reason. Maybe it is just a convenient length for most users and it simplifies inventory?
  7. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Probably simplifies inventory. You can buy extension lengths of it.......also in 20' lengths.
  8. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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    This source pretty much shows that lead length is whatever it needs to be and their standard is 50 feet. Note that several of the cells don't even come with wire attached so you can use your own.

    http://www.gmcelectrical.net/Pages/GMC_STAPERM_REFERENCE_ELECTRODES.aspx

    I have had one for a couple of years that I got from reliability-direct and use it with a cheap digital meter. The meter and electrode live in a little plastic box from Office Depot. Use it, flush it with clean water, let it dry and store it away until needed. It makes me laugh to see what some surveyors charge for doing a "corrosion potential survey."

    Next thing might be a "primary cell electrical potential differential analysis" which is performed by sticking the leads of a volmeter across the battery terminals. ;)
  9. BillManthorne

    BillManthorne Member

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    I have 2 banks of breaks. AC and DC. I did not see any double pole breakers...
  10. CSkipR

    CSkipR Member

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    AC panel is on the left. All my 240v double pole breakers are at the bottom of the ac panel. That includes the 2 ac units, the ac pump, water heater and battery charger. Total of 5.
  11. BillManthorne

    BillManthorne Member

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    Electrician is heading to the boat next week. the AC pump and compressors are 120v. The newer Cabos switched to 240v. mine is a 2000.
  12. CSkipR

    CSkipR Member

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    Mine is 2005.
  13. NEO56

    NEO56 Member

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    Somebody on this thread mentioned "hot" boats in a Marina, I'm sure every Marina probably has their share of "hot" boats. Is there anyway you can install....I don't know, a galvanic isolator to insulate your boat from other "hot" boats?
  14. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Yes you can install one and it's generally relatively easy. Most boats come with them from the manufacturer, but it's recommended to change them every so many years.
  15. NEO56

    NEO56 Member

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    Capt J, can you tell me what the system is composed of? How is it tied into the electrical system? Thanks,
  16. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    It is a magic box that burns off any electricity or absorbs it on your shorepower a/c electric system, something along those lines. Galvanic Isolators use Isolation Diodes to isolate it. It is usually connected very close to where the shorepower comes into the boat and you basically create a break in the green wire, connect one side to one terminal and the other side to the other terminal of the galvanic isolator. They usually not too expensive for a 50amp one, $300-400. If you have an isolation transformer like Hatteras installs and others, you don't need a galvanic isolator as the transformer does it.

    The West Marine advisor has a good article on marine grounding systems which covers all of that.
  17. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Galvanic Isolators allows A C Power fault current to flow correctly on the green shore power lead.
    Galvanic Isolators block any D C current from passing on this same green shore lead.

    It is this D C current that makes the big cycle thru the bonding system, out your underwater metals (taking zinc, then metal particles with the current off of your equipment), thru the sea water (battery electrolyte), to your neighbor's boat underwater metals, bonding system, green wire power, up on the dock electric service all common green wire, then back to your boat and over again. AND all the other boats are doing it tied to this common green wire and the battery acid the boats float in.

    Blocking this cycle with a Galvanic Isolator helps greatly. However, it's not a complete answer.
    If you have stray or fault current generated on your boat, naturally it wants to leave and flow to a lesser level than itself to discharge. Then out the bonding system it can go (taking zinc, then metal particles with the current off of your equipment) till these currents find anything to displace in. Earth ground (river bed) may work.
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2014
  18. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Was just thinking of things that have left their teeth marks thru the years. Easy for you to check;
    Any bilge pump, sump pump, switches, light, alarm and any wires in your bilges touching bilge water?
    Any problem bilge pumps or pumps that stay submerged? Any electric wire or device that stays wet?

    Been bit on these lines many times before. Bad / shorted motors, leaking wires / crimps and terminal strips / crimps that fell into bilge water.

    And the big bite scars, fallen & chafed wires across the rudder post tiller tie bar.

    Get another cup of coffee and a flashlight. Give your bilges a good look a bout. All pumps should be above the bilge water. No wires in the water. No stray wires leaning / laying on or supported by bonded metal objects that can chafe & short on to.

    Just some memories that may help you find that easy fault.
  19. walkinginshadow

    walkinginshadow Member

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    Have you checked the grounding on our motors?
  20. BillManthorne

    BillManthorne Member

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    I am not on the boat now but thank you for the ideas. I have a marine electrician lined up for later this week.