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Boarding from tenders

Discussion in 'Tenders & Dinghies' started by Codger, Mar 15, 2009.

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  1. Codger

    Codger YF Wisdom Dept.

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    Boarding a stationary rig from a rib even in half metre swells can get your attention. Just been thinking about procedures for getting passengers with little to no experience, aboard from tenders or toys when things get a little rough.
    How is this dealt with?
  2. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Very Carefully!

    It depends a lot on what type of Tender you have and where the people are getting on/off the yacht.

    Rubber boats whilst not the most popular with the evening wear and permed hair brigade are very stable platforms for this and people can stand on the tubes whilst negotiating their way on of off the yacht.

    Extra bodies with willing hands and some good words of encouragement also help those unfamiliar with or nervous about this type of activity.

    The best way to avoid any hassles with this is to try and avoid moving people on and off when there is any swell around. A lot easier said than done when anchored off St Tropez in the Summer :)
  3. Codger

    Codger YF Wisdom Dept.

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    Thanks
    Having witnessed some of the people getting in to a tender at the dock, after dinner, I was having images with unfortunate outcomes of those same people attempting to board the yacht out in the harbour. Just struck me that I've never actually seen that boarding take place. Just trying to picture some of the half cut lovelies in slippery shoes make the jump is creating a little uncomfortable twitchyness for me.
  4. Fishtigua

    Fishtigua Senior Member

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    There are two schools of thought to this, while in rough weather.

    1. From the aft platform. The tender will be broadside to any swell and roll like a pig, sometimes getting caught under the platform.

    2. From alongside. Now the tender will be pitching like a bronco but at least the fulcrum of motion will allow a 'sweet spot' to chuck the guests out. On occasion the odd wave will catch a guest in the fork, always cheers you up.

    Yep K1W1, St. Tropez and Cannes are killer for this sort of fun.
  5. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

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    That's one of the nice things about having a big RIB as a tender. You can pin the bow against the mothership with power to make it easier for guests to debark.

    But in those situations, as with most things in life, it's all about timing.
  6. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Typically if you're boaring a yacht that is anchored, the yachts bow is into the waves and cuts most of it so that at the transom it's usually not too bad and if you tie the tender sideways to the swim platform fairly tight, you usually don't get too much movement....... the bow against the swim platform works fairly well but it's usually a good jump.
  7. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

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    also this is just usefull for big yachts, i prefer the method used on "princess mariana" - a float-in-garage

    even if the water is to rough inside it you can pump it out and get on the yacht with no harm

    an other method would be a tender, which has a special lock to be locked on the yacht while boarding - maybe a fold down ladder which moves with the tender

    just some simple things i got in mind reading this
  8. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    using a spring line to hold the tender alongside the swimplatform works pretty well. The biggest issue is to make sure the tender doesn't get caught under the swim platform (damage and possible injuries). If i faced using the tender in rough condition, i'd add some brackets to the SP extending below the waterline to prevent the dinghy from getting caught.
  9. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

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    what about a strong electromagnet alongside the boat - the tender would have a side-wall of steel and in case of rough condition you'll just activate the magnet - the tender would be raised alongside the boat.

    most of the engine produce a lot of power - there should be some for an electromagnet ;)
  10. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    You don't get many steel tenders on megayachts where weight always seems to be a major issue with Tender design and construction.

    What do you think would happen if you were alongside with your magnet and the water below the tender went away- You think it would hang on by one side when a metre or so above the water?

    If it were attached rigidly and the water came up it could well fill the tender thereby increasing it's weight way beyond the weight the magnet or Tender side could support.
  11. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

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    hm - you see - i got the visions - you'll build them :D
  12. Codger

    Codger YF Wisdom Dept.

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    One other teeny tiny potential problem with this. The magnetic field around that kind of coupling might just interfere with someone's heart pacemaker. Of course some, like me, would prefer to have the steel pins and screws holding some of my bones together from being extracted with so much finesse should the coupling be activated at an inappropriate time. Doubt that my impression of a squid would really be that entertaining.
  13. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

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    i'd love to see some bones cracking ;)

    all right: easier way, DON'T BOARD IN ROUGHT WATERS !!!

    ;)
  14. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

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    If a magnetic field could effect the screws and pins holding you together, I'd be more worried about rust. :D
  15. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Of all the ideas and opinions i've read in this thread, this is the most important, also keeping the vessels pressed to co-ordinate the rise and fall as much as possible. Making sure that the guests step off at the top of the rise is also important.
  16. Loren Schweizer

    Loren Schweizer YF Associate Writer

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    Rendova is one RIB manufacturer which tout their flat gunwales as making for safer ingress/egress.
  17. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    I usually suggest sitting on the tube and bringing the legs around where I'll help the guest up which is a less than desireable maneuver with the skirt crowd. This sounds really good. I'm not familiar with this manufacturer and a web search seems to run in circles. Does anyone have a site for them?
  18. Fishtigua

    Fishtigua Senior Member

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    Has anyone had experience with a catamaran tender?

    All the big cruise ships now seem to use them, are they worth thinking about at yacht size? Are they really more stable in a smaller size than the liner ones?

    Just a thought.

    Fish
  19. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Haven't used one as a tender, but have for other commercial work and yes that are very stable. Staying flat or even leaning out on turns sometimes takes a bit of getting used to though.
  20. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    On a project I was involved in we spent a lot of time and the Owners money looking at a 10m Catamaran Tender, a design was agreed and we had a price to build it.

    Then along came a request from the Owner for a tender he could have on his existing boat with no wait, one was found albeit a fairly used and abused monohull but it had been on a boat like his before so it fitted no big deal.

    It was shortly thereafter announced by the Owner that he wanted one of these on his new boat just 2 m longer, this was made and delivered by the same guy who made the tenders for Predator and the Owner is as happy as larry (It is not the only Tender aboard) and the catamaran design was left in a folder on the shelf in my office exactly where it sits today.