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Biodiesel in our boats???

Discussion in 'Technical Discussion' started by costa mike, Aug 30, 2007.

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  1. costa mike

    costa mike New Member

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    Location:
    puerto jimenez
    would appreciate any knowledge about biodiesel in my cummin 315 6bts

    i am in costa rica and have access to biodiesel and want to add it to my normal diesel for an eco groovy way of doing things if it makes sense

    thanks for your time

    mike
    www.cabo-matapalo.com
  2. C4ENG

    C4ENG Senior Member

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    Ft Lauderdale
    I had brought up this subject one time before in here when a Captain I was working for was talking about loading a 150ft boat with Biodeisel.
    Bottom line answer for my situation, fuel lines and and gaskets may or may not be suitable for handeling the biofuels causing failures. There was also a lot of talk about the Fiberglass boat fuel tanks not being able to hold the fuel as well as the glass would fail and leak.
    Unless your boat was designed with the thoughts in mind for Biofuels, I personaly would not take the chance.
  3. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    I would suggest you start by asking Cummins if your engines can take it.
  4. airship

    airship Senior Member

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    French Riviera...
    Would adding a normal biocide additive to biodiesel "kill" the fuel? :confused:
  5. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    Biodiesel is still mostly good old diesel (normally 20% Biodiesel to 80% diesel) so I doubt it would cause any harm
  6. Edphoto

    Edphoto New Member

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    Aug 31, 2007
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    Location:
    Amsterdam port region
    Earthrace

    01-09-2007, Amsterdam het IJ. How about this one.

    This awesome ship will attempt to break the worldrecord for a voyage around the world running on 100% biodiesel.
    read all about it at:
    http://www.earthrace.net/index.php?section=2

    Attached Files:

  7. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    Welcome to Yacht Forums.

    This is not the first attempt to do this by this boat.

    It has been written about before here on YF for the previous effort.

    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/g...415-earthrace-2006-a.html?highlight=earthrace

    Here is some press news for the next effort.

    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/g...611-earthrace-2008-a.html?highlight=earthrace

    100% Biodiesel does not mean 100% non fossil fuels. I have been interested in this subject for quite a while and have found that the normal ratio of standard diesel fuel to vegetable oil mixing is 80% to 20%.
  8. Codger

    Codger YF Wisdom Dept.

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    Be careful with the designations when purchasing. B100 is 100% bio-diesel 0% petroleum based diesel. B20 is 20% bio-diesel, 80% petroleum based diesel.
    There is even B5 out there which came to be as much over a perceived lack of lubricity in ULSD as anything else.
    Current Cummins diesels in pick up trucks running various mixes from straight petroleum diesel to B50 without issue in the summer. Cold weather has it's own issues so safer to go to straight petroleum diesel when ambient temps below +5C.
    Does not mean that any of that experience would translate to any other Cummins diesel in any other installation. As noted, check with Cummins and then check the entire installation for compatability before using anything beyond B5.
  9. Highlander

    Highlander New Member

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    Cummins and Biodiesel

    Cummins has published some info on biodiesel. The info is on thier web site. You have to give them credit for having an opinion as most builders are afraid to take a stand.
    B5 is a drop in replacement for petroleum diesel. You can run it in ANY diesel of any age without problems from deposits loosening or seals swelling.
    B2 has double the lubricating properties of straight diesel.
    There are two problems with high blends, B50 to B100 besides the gell point.
    Biodiesel has a higher viscosity and may add stress to the fuel pump.
    Biodiesel is also more active and will attack seals (unless Viton seals are used)
    and disolve fuel system deposits.

    The Cummins paper seemed to say, up to B20 is OK but B5 is not going to keep you up at night.
    I have been adding from 2 to 5% as a lubricity enhancer and have seen a decrease in smoke. These are Yanmar all mechanical engines 420 hp.
    They have 1100 hrs with no problems.

    Carl
  10. mp-willow

    mp-willow Senior Member

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    Has anyone looked at running large Yachts on biodiesel?
    It sounds like the Yachting world would have thought about it. Most are more forward thinking then most. :rolleyes:
  11. Highlander

    Highlander New Member

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    Biodiesel Supply

    The problem is getting Biodiesel at the dock. I have been hauling it to the boat in 5 gal jugs.
    This whole discussion is frustrating. Why isnt Biodiesel blended into ALL fuel at a low percentage? The current production levels could only support a very low level blend (probly less than 1%) but by putting it in all fuel there would be no added cost in storage and handling equipment. As new plants come on line the percentage can be adjusted upward untill some predetermined mix is achieved.
    For large yachts you could have it delivered. My local Biodiesel guy will deliver
    as little as 55 gallons of B100. Just dump it in the tank and then top of with regular fuel. Splash blending is an acceptable method and the two fuels mix naturally in the tank.
    A local heating fuel company has started selling B2, (they call it bioheat) to all customers.
    It's just going to take some time and "early adopters" will have to suffer for a while.

    Carl
  12. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi ,

    Free delivery isn't abnormal.

    5 yrs ago I did a deal with German suppliers where they would with road tanker deliver 200k Lt or more for the same as tax paid fuel in the South of France. It's a shame it hasn't happened because the target is still under construction.
  13. viking 40

    viking 40 New Member

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    I've researched it a little. mainly looking for a way to reduce the cost of fuel, since it has doubled since I bought my boat. In the b100, they use the additive methanol(?), which eats fuel lines and seals. It also needs/preffers to be warmed/heated, before it hits the injectors. One way I heard would help aleviate this issue and may work for me, is to start and warm the engines on regular diesal, then switch to b100 for running. Switching again to reg before shut down. I have 2-150 gal main tanks and 1-90 gal reserve. 90 gal for reg, 300gal for fried chicken!,..I meen veggy oil.
    I looked at some home refining systems and decided that I would save time and more money, if I made my own liquor and beer.
    The only places that sell it, are 50+ miles away and the cost/hassle is a deterant.
  14. Highlander

    Highlander New Member

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    Addatives? NO!

    Methanol is used in the conversion of veggie oil to biosiesel fuel. The alchohol and a base material combine to separate glycerine from the oil.
    I too have looked at a small plant to make fuel at home and I just dont want to do it.
    Any methanol remaining is the result of poor procedures. As standards come into play the quality will improve. This is a good reason to buy from a producer that tests the fuel product.
    Right now, a blend just makes the most sense. Maybe a new boat that is built with biodiesel in mind could burn B100 with no trouble. Reducing your petroleum deisel use by 20% or 50% is a good start.

    The system of starting on regular diesel and switching to vegie oil was developed to burn un-converted vegie oils. Yes it works but the long term deposits in the engine could be fatal. The problem is the glycerine component in vegie oil. Yes I know that the original "diesel" ran his engine on peanut oil and he had a vision of a natural fuel source that can be farmed.

    Happy Holidays

    Carl