Click for Walker Click for Llebroc Click for Cross Click for Burger Click for Abeking

beach the tide

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by Roman7000, Sep 9, 2011.

  1. Roman7000

    Roman7000 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary
    Folks,

    I was wondering if someone could help me make sense of what the phrase "beach the tide" could mean in the following context:

    "we have thought through every detail of the boat. A few examples are a table which can be hidden in the cockpit floor, the opportunity to **beach the tide**, a large storage capacity in which the bimini and/or the awning can neatly be stored in the covering board.

    Much obliged!
  2. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    10,127
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Over 50 years in boating and that's a new one on me. The closest I can come is to 'watch the tide when you beach a boat'. How big of a boat are we referring to? It sounds like a run-about with the table being stowed in the floor and the bimini dropping beneath a hatch behind the seat (both fairly common on small boats. I understand the rest of the sentence, but on "beach the tide", not a clue. Could they have meant beach the boat. Some bowriders have a boarding ladder in their bow which makes getting off when beached easier. :confused:
  3. Savasa

    Savasa Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    168
    Location:
    Iqaluit, Nunavit, Canada
    Greetings,
    With reference to NYCAP's comment about laying the boat onshore and watching the tide, could it be "the tide's a beach"? (if you're not careful). Oh, and welcome to the forum Roman...eh?
    Peter
  4. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale FL
    I'm guessing it means the boat is designed so you can beach the boat as the tide goes out with it remaining up right on perhaps bilge keels of some kind.
  5. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    12,931
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    Or has protected running gear so that it doesn't hurt the running gear.
  6. YES!

    YES! Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2005
    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL
    That's what blow-boaters do to scrape the barnacles off the hull. Run it up on the beach at 3/4 tide ebbing and you have a day to get the bottom done. God's travel lift returns on schedule.
  7. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale FL
    Wouldn't it take two days? As you have to let the tide come in again and then let the boat lay over on the other side. :)
  8. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    10,127
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    YES, most of us are probably familiar with using God's travel lift but have you actually heard it referred to as "beach the tide"? I've got nothing but guesses. Roman 7000, You've come here with a statement that seems to have heads scratching. Some good thoughts here, but any chance you can ask the source of the statement and educate us.
  9. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,320
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    Since "careening" is the proper term for self-stranding to perform hull work I wonder if the unknown term is a typo in the orginal source.
  10. wscott52

    wscott52 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    300
    Location:
    SE Florida
    I got no answer but will be curious to see if any comes up. I've been around boats and boating a long time also (ok, I've also got 50+ years) and never heard it until now.
  11. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    10,127
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I'm inclined to agree with Marmot. That's why I asked about the size boat. I think someone may have said "opportunity to beach the boat", mentioned something about tides and they got put together. So far I see about 200+ years of boating experience here unfamiliar with the term.
  12. Ju52

    Ju52 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    150
    Location:
    Frankfurt
    I tried any google hacks to find it anywhere ... nothing
    must be a spelling error or a missing word?

    could be : beach with the tide ?

    my 2 cents
  13. sunray09

    sunray09 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    London
    I like this explanation..but one wonders if the weight and balance..and other areas of the hull are protected enough to withstand an intentional..beaching.
    Smaller boats have Beaching shoe's...
    Putting a multi million dollar yacht on its keel with no protection against..
    abrasion seems to be a risk not worth taking unless you have an aluminum or steel hull.
  14. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    10,127
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I think our friend from Calgary was just trying to invent a colloquialism so that when he hears it years from now he can say "I invented that term and I can verify it through YF", hence his absence since. It means nothing. 23 skidoo.:)
  15. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    Messages:
    614
    Location:
    flensburg, germany
    Beaching the tide like this?

    Attached Files:

  16. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    7,393
    Location:
    My Office
    Hi,

    That is a popular NZ pastime. Never encountered the term till I saw it on here.