Click for Burger Click for Llebroc Click for JetForums Click for Lurssen Click for Westport

Anchoring in a sportfish

Discussion in 'General Sportfish Discussion' started by zen, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. Prospective

    Prospective Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2016
    Messages:
    151
    Location:
    New England
    I would add for the OP that another reason sport fish don't anchor out as much, particularly in the warm climates is lack of ventilation. So you're going to be running generators 24/7 in most cases. We moor and anchor pretty frequently but that's in the north east and often times I wish I had a lot more natural ventilation like on a MY.
  2. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,975
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    I can not imagine the roller and setup to be too weak to handle a 110 pound anchor. Under way there should be a chain lock or some way to secure the chain.

    you need to see what kind of windlass is installed but again I bet it is big enough. The only issue sometimes is whether a bigger anchor will stop properly and most importantly self launch
  3. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,975
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    modern motoryachts have the same issue. Very few have enough natural ventilation.
  4. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    12,056
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    Quite frankly, I would just worry about buying the sportfish that meets all of your needs, then worry about working out the anchor situation. Usually it's not that big of a deal to change ground tackle.
  5. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2010
    Messages:
    2,061
    Location:
    Cold Spring Harbor, NY
    Excellent. I have only N.E. experience. Absolutely true on the ground tackle. To the extent an owner can reasonably oversize that's good too. Some times in a prevailing wind I have seen boats use two anchors. Supposedly it not only supplies more holding power, but also decreases the swing? Sure don't want to do that if the tide is going to turn you, though.

    Up here we also don't have to worry about knife edged coral, so chain/rope combinations are common.

    Can any one remind me of the name for those weights that slide down the main anchor line on an auxiliary line to hold the anchor rode more parallel with the bottom for more holding power? I think it begins with a "K"?
  6. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,975
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    I never use two anchors. I much prefer an oversized anchor with at least 100/150 of chain.

    two anchors will eventually foul and if you need to get out of there in a hurry (like some guy dragging on you... been there done that), a single oversize anchor makes it a lot easier.

    aren’t these weight called Kedge ? But again, it is just complicating things
  7. zen

    zen Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2016
    Messages:
    47
    Location:
    Delray Beach
    We've bounced back and forth between a motor yacht and sportfish and this is very true. Lots of windows, none of them open and you're running the generator all the time. In the 60ft+ range, only hard core cruising boats like Flemings appear to have enough ventilation to keep the gen off for a little while.
  8. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2010
    Messages:
    2,061
    Location:
    Cold Spring Harbor, NY
    I agree on 2 anchor setup being a real potential for problems. I have an oversize danford which has worked just fine for us over 20 years. I can remember only one or 2 time that it didn't reset on a tide shift ( I set my bedside alarm to the tides).

    I think a Kedge is an anchor used to help drag you off a bar - sailboaters are very familiar with them, I believe.
  9. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,975
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    That’s the problem with danforth... they don’t reset well as they get clogged by mud or grass.

    no matter what i never go to bed without an anchor alarm set in my phone.


    You re right. A ledge is a type of anchor. Kellet is the weight
  10. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2010
    Messages:
    2,061
    Location:
    Cold Spring Harbor, NY
    Kellet - excellent, thank you! Never used one of those either, but I've heard they really help in a storm? I would expect that the larger the boat the least effective they are, though.
  11. cleanslate

    cleanslate Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Messages:
    705
    Location:
    Cherry Hill, NJ
    Because the builders don't want to deal with the extra work and time it takes to put in a proper leak free deck hatch or slider windows or hinged windows to get fresh air through the boat . It's a hard to find things that used to be a common place on boats / yachts. I've got working leak free sliding window in my saloon . Forward deck hatch and aft hatch along with hull port windows that really let the air flow through. I'm sure you Hatt is the same way.
  12. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2004
    Messages:
    8,241
    Location:
    Satsuma, FL
  13. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2004
    Messages:
    8,241
    Location:
    Satsuma, FL
    We had a Danforth Hi Tensile when we purchased our 58 Bert MY. It was the correct size but totality worthless.
    POS would come loose in a sneeze.
    Sold that real fast at a swap meet and shopped for a couple of Fortress FX85 anchors.
    They did well with 30' chain and 1" nylon but sometimes did not re-set quick enough for us.
    They saved our but in some heavy storms but are in forward deck storage now, collecting dust and not seen light of day in many years.

    We started using a 65lb Bruce that never had a problem. Was very proud of Dat Ugly Claw.
    But when offered a shinny 115lb stainless Bruce from a 72Hatt, I had to have it. Had to have all chain and had to have a new windlass.
    We sometimes use a nylon snubber just to keep the chain racket down for guest.
    I also have a PC in our master with a chart tool showing our swing real time.
    Alarm goes off, just open an eye to see whats going on. Usually GPS error than drag. I use tight alarms.
    If & When the new anchor does rolls over, it resets quickly, mostly within it's shank length.

    The Claw anchors are the best for us, in the bottoms from Jax to the islands. Never an issue.
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2020
  14. Ralph Holiman

    Ralph Holiman New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Mississippi
    We have an 85 pound Mantus on our 42 Bertram MY, with 250 feet of chain. So far, we're happy, and we stay put. I'm just a big fan of the new generation anchors. We've spent a lot of time in the Bahamas, over the years, in a lot of blows, with a 55 pound Rocna, and 180 feet of chain, on a 42 Catalina sailboat and were likewise, very happy with how it worked.

    We have a 60 pound Manson Supreme (that I picked up used, on the cheap), with 50 feet of chain, and 250 feet of line, for our backup anchor. And, the huge Danforth, the boat came with.