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AIS Security

Discussion in 'Electronics' started by Capt Ralph, Jan 10, 2020.

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  1. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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  2. bayoubud

    bayoubud Senior Member

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    Have not seen that yet. Sounds like another way to help keep traffic out of a "hot" closed area. Are there actual buoy's there also? How does that AIS boundary look on your screen?
  3. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Some caution fixed cans are in place now. You have to know the schedule.
    I have not seen the AIS boundary system but read it somewhere. Special AIS marks over the same location as the fixed cans. The AIS data includes the schedule info. The Cans will probable be removed in the future.
    Some Channel inlets buoys are getting replaced with AIS marks also. I hope not the ones with the racon reflectors in it.
  4. bayoubud

    bayoubud Senior Member

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    I was wondering about the buoy's. Read where they can be in place or virtual buoy's. Not keen on virtual buoy's and prefer having the physical buoy's for navigation.
  5. bayoubud

    bayoubud Senior Member

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    Some inlets can easily change with bad weather or dredging, guess they would have to update a virtual often.
  6. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

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    In two of these boundary areas, one off the cape and one off Virginia Beach, I've had some really strange AIS anomalies. I've recorded one, but the other caught me at a somewhat sleep deprived moment, and I didn't fully grasp what was happening until the feedback had ended. Shortly thereafter I was in the midst of a high speed, 1000 foot flyover that went vertical off my bow and heading.
  7. bayoubud

    bayoubud Senior Member

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    I imagine that got your attention! There are some areas in the Norther GOM that are closed during military maneuvers. Neither area would be a safe place to put buoy cans offshore. Don't think they use AIS for either area. Have been offshore trolling a number of times and been buzzed by a fighter jet! Talk about a wake up call!!
  8. Oscarvan

    Oscarvan Senior Member

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    Known in the aviator world as a "bikini check".
  9. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    I remember when electronic chart plotters were getting fancy. We were told to keep our paper charts.
    In reading the article, We need to verify AIS targets also.
    Is this another reminder to NOT have faith in these gizmos no matter how hard it is getting pressed onto us?
  10. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I still see major navigational issues with electronic chartplotters. There are many places where the chartplotter is so skewed in one direction that the boat appears on land, or a good 1/4 mile away from it's real location. This extends to the entire chart page on the electronic chartplotter. I still create a route from paper charts and then put the waypoints into a GPS for almost all of my trips.
  11. bayoubud

    bayoubud Senior Member

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    After reading more about AIS buoy's there are some real advantages on physical buoy's. A definite cost savings for the virtual buoy's. Not sure how it would help the average boater, but can see where it would work for inlet sea buoy's, busy channels, and hazardous areas to navigate. Our current boat is a first with AIS and so far I like it. Really liked it when running at night, especially when running the coastline and encountering numerous other vessels, many with AIS. In Capt J's position running so many different boats with variable electronics you would have to have a dependable system. Our electronic tech does deliveries, he carries his laptop with Nobeltec software, says always the same.
  12. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    I rarely see this issues with plotters anymore at least on the good systems. We have a Simrad touch screen on out tender which is pretty much useless. The charts are awful and yes often show the boat on land. But everything else whether Navnet 3D or even iPad apps extremely accurate. I ve never seen the position being off
  13. alvareza

    alvareza Member

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    I like to use the radar overlay to verify the position of marker and bouys. Especially in places with cross channel current with low visibility. Not an option with AIS.
  14. Rodger

    Rodger Senior Member

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    The St Lawrence Seaway was one of the first users of AIS.
    They told shipping companies they would not use it to control speed limits but guess what happened a year latter,
    now when a ship goes over the posted speed limit it sets off and alarm in the control center and they give the ship one warning next time they are fined.
    I no of one yacht a few years ago that was charged for doing 1.2 knots over the limit and was a pretty hefty fine.
  15. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I see it on the large Simrad plotters and also on Garmins. The pre-loaded garmin charts on the garmin chart plotters are my favorite though. On the large Simrad system, I started with a Navionics chip which was not only horrible regarding accuracy of the depths and kept locking up the machine. I switched to a C MAP chip which functions flawlessly, but is a little light on soundings (not as close together or as many) compared to the pre-loaded Garmin.
  16. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    In the Bahamas Navionics is pretty much useless. It s either missing some shoals and reefs or it makes some up... Explorer charts (Cmap) is the only ones to use unless when sticking to basics routes
  17. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

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    Yes, I converted to CMap some time ago and completely agree. Of course nothing beats time in an area and creating/verifying your own routes. Some are well ahead of others in this regard.
  18. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

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    These weren't just bikini check moments for me, aboard. This is an AIS target suddenly appearing, say, 1/4 mile off your starboard midship, heading in your same direction, and ticking off the AIS alarms. As you're scanning your radar and horizon for this object that your system is now automatically tracking for you, you're dumbfounded to realize there "is no one there". Then the target picks up speed, crosses your forward heading at two to three times your displacement speed, and eventually disappears from your system.

    Happened twice, and both times in the zone of military buoys.
  19. Oscarvan

    Oscarvan Senior Member

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    Ah yes.... that's different. Interesting.....
  20. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    From East Coast Alerts;

    FL—Cape Canaveral Space Launch Zone AIS:
    The U.S. Coast Guard has approved the use of a Virtual Automatic Identification System Private Aid to Navigation (V-AIS PATON) to mark a restricted navigation area during a space launch. The Coast Guard authorized the Space Exploration Technologies Corporation, better known as SpaceX, to use Virtual-AIS PATONs to inform mariners of non-charted restricted zones around launch areas. While the Coast Guard does not approve Virtual-AIS PATON for all restricted areas, particularly charted ones, the space launch zones are non-charted, dynamic and temporary. Safety zones designed to keep vessels from entering the launch area while an active rocket launch is taking place.

    The Captain of the Port Jacksonville, FL will activate Safety Zone "B" located near Cape Canaveral, as described in 33 CFR 165.775(a)(2), 45 minutes prior to the opening of the scheduled launch window. At that time, SpaceX will transmit Virtual-AIS aids marking the corners of the active safety zone. The virtual-AIS aids will remain transmitting until the Captain of the Port Jacksonville has deactivated the safety zone. The Virtual-AIS aids will be labeled:

    N 28° 48.8’ W 80° 28.9’ (28.813333 -80.481667) N1*X*33CFR165.775 (A) (2), MMSI# 993663027

    N 28° 29.7’ W 80° 18.9’ (28.495000 -80.315000) E2*X*33CFR165.775 (A) (2), MMSI# 993663028

    N 28° 29.7’ W 80° 31.6’ (28.495000 -80.526667) S3*X*33CFR165.775 (A) (2), MMSI# 993663029

    N 28° 40.1’ W 80° 38.4’ (28.668333 -80.640000) W4*X*33CFR165.775 (A) (2), MMSI# 993663030

    If a vessel equipped with AIS is determined to be entering the launch hazard area, an addressed safety message 14 with the text "REGULATED AREA 33 CFR 165.775 ACTIVE STAY CLEAR" will be transmitted to the vessel. All provisions of the safety zone remain in effect; no person or vessel may enter, pass through or remain within the safety zone unless authorized by the Captain of the Port. Mariners are required to contact the Coast Guard via VHF FM channel 16 to arrange for this authorization. (7th District LNM Week 02/2020)

    FL—Cape Canaveral, Falcon 9 Launch Hazard:
    Eastern Range will be conducting hazardous operations surface to unlimited within portions of Warning Areas W497A, W497B and the following Launch Hazard Areas.
    From 2835N 8038W
    2838N 8038W
    2842N 8029W
    2845N 8020W
    2847N 8007W
    2835N 8005W
    2832N 8013W
    2831N 8028W to beginning
    From 2858N 7511W
    2858N 7443W
    2846N 7443W
    2846N 7511W to beginning

    Hazard periods for primary launch day and backup launch day;
    Primary launch day: 18 / 1255Z thru 18 / 1725Z Jan 20. Preferred T-0 is 1300Z. Backup launch day(1): 19 / 1255Z thru 19 / 1725Z Jan 20. Preferred T-0 is 1300Z. Backup launch day(2): 20 / 1255Z thru 20 / 1725Z Jan 20. Preferred T-0 is 1300Z. (7th District LNM Week 02/2020)

    FL—Cape Canaveral. Falcon 9 Launch Hazard:
    Eastern Range will be conducting hazardous operations surface to unlimited within portions of Warning Areas W497A, W497B, W137G, W139E/F, W122 and the following Launch Hazard Areas.
    From 2836 10.48N 8035 20.43W
    2847N 8020W
    2852N 8013W
    2850N 8010W
    2838N 8020W
    2835N 8024W
    2832N 8033W
    2832N 8033 42.61W to beginning
    From 3156N 7644W
    3339N 7528W
    3343N 7433W
    3336N 7427W
    3233N 7447W
    3150N 7636W to beginning

    Hazard periods for primary launch day and backup launch day;
    Primary launch day: 20 / 1710Z thru 20 / 1818Z Jan 20. Preferred T-0 is 1720Z. Backup launch day: 22 / 1627Z thru 22 / 1735Z Jan 20. Preferred T-0 is 1637Z. (7th District LNM Week 02/2020)