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87 Ocean 55 Super Sport Haul Out Information Required

Discussion in 'Ocean Yacht' started by Beagle Boy, May 24, 2016.

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  1. Beagle Boy

    Beagle Boy New Member

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    Australia
    I am currently assessing moving from a 48ft full keel trawler to one of these vessels. Having done all my research I am off to the other side of the country tomorrow to look at it.
    Our facilities are somewhat limited in my area so one of the final decisions for me is having the ability to haul out annually.
    We have no sling lift available, the only thing we have available is a mobile cradle. I have been unable to locate the correct US term for it (we call them slips in Oz) but essentially it is a full cradle on train wheels. It lowers into the water, you drive the boat on and pull the upright timbers up to the sides and lock. Then they winch you out of the water along train tracks. It stays on that cradle the whole time. Photo attached.
    This is fine with my current boat as the whole keel sits on timbers and the side uprights hold her there.
    On the Ocean, it appears to have a small keel that runs up to about midships and stops. Then nothing but running gear. I have attached a photo of one that was placed on stands by a sling lift, but I am sure you all know what it looks like.
    Do any of you Ocean owners have a setup like the described mobile cradle that you use on your vessel? Or does anyone have original documentation from the manufacturer that gives instructions on haul out covering my style of cradle - such as where to place the supports etc?
    many thanks in advance.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 24, 2016
  2. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    I would think one of your first stops should be the shipyard that is going to haul your boat and ask them if they can do it.
  3. Beagle Boy

    Beagle Boy New Member

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    Yep thanks and done. Just because someone says they can haul your boat it is unwise to let them do so without them knowing lift or brace points. If someone has to guess then I would rather they guessed with someone else boat.
    No boat like this in this in our of the world so I am hoping for assistance from someone that owns one.
    Too late to ask for guidance once something is broken!!
  4. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    There is quite a difference between being able to walk into a facility and ask them if they can do something and being given assurances by anonymous keyboard warriors on here.

    As a business they will have insurance and if in Australia I am sure there are many health and safety requirements as well.
  5. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    In the USA it's called a railway. It predates the travel lift and some older yards here still use them. Many wooden boat owners prefer the railway method over lifting with the straps of a travel lift.

    In any case the boat will rest on whatever keel is available. In the case of a deep vee or no keel, or if support is needed further aft they will block it up so the running gear will clear the railway cross beam.

    Full keel, short keel, or no keel is a non issue so long as the yard is competent.
  6. dsharp

    dsharp Senior Member

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    The yard should have some way to block the aft section at the chines. It appears that the keel on the Ocean carries back to where the engines are located therefore supporting most of the weight. As long as they chock it at the chines it shouldn't be a problem. The only thing that I would be concerned about is the length of the cradle that is being used. You would need to know the length to insure support for the rear chocks. My Dad has told me plenty of stories about his railway and I've seen pictures but, as far as using a rail it was way before my time.
  7. Beagle Boy

    Beagle Boy New Member

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    K1Wi - thanks but not looking for keyboard warriors. Posting in the Ocean forum hoping that someone that owns one might have the original documentation showing chock points. Being covered by insurance doesn't assist - if the boat is damaged it means a 400NM trip to a shipwright yard for repairs and who knows how long without a boat. I would rather do the right thing in the beginning.
    RER - still better to have photos of one on a railway so we can see correct chock points etc. Yard can only be competent if they have had experience with this kind of vessel. As stated, there is nothing like this boat in this area.
    dsharp - thanks for the input. Correct, I have looked at the boat now and can confirm that is exactly where the keel finishes. I am thinking that the section aft of the keel must just hang in the air! The stringers are a good 450mm wide so i dont think the cockpit will fall off. (hoping.....) We might be able to put a timber prop under the cockpit area for additional support once it comes up out of the water.

    no responses from any Ocean owners by the look of it so I will try some other forums.
    thanks all for your input.
  8. gcsi

    gcsi Member

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    Beagle Boy: Google Viking Boat Works in St. Petersburg, Florida; speak with Eric. That yard was the factory service center for Ocean and has decades of experience hauling / repairing various models, they will be able to help. If you have problems getting contact info, send me a PM and I'll forward same.
  9. Kaleigh

    Kaleigh New Member

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    Was anyone ever able to provide more info on chock placement for this boat? Also looking to haul out on a railway and any help is appreciated. Or is anyone has the actual measurements for the length of the keel?
  10. Capt Fred

    Capt Fred Senior Member

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    This is what I got from another member, it may provide some help. A friend of mine had a 38 Ocean and it was chocked at the very end of the keel and it cracked that area. I would put the last keel block forward of the end of the keel by 12 or so inches and would load the chines, see attached.

    Attached Files:

  11. DOCKMASTER

    DOCKMASTER Senior Member

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    The marine railway shown will load 100% of the weight on the keel. The side towers are only to prevent overturning. Trying to get load onto the chines on a marine railway is extremely difficult due to the slope of the railway. About the only way to do it safely is to build a trapezodial cradle so you lift the boat level despite the slope of the rail. Otherwise you can't support the chine until the boat is all the way on the railway cradle. Another option is to get the boat landed on the keel but not haul it all the way up so you maintain some bouyancy and then have divers install chine supports then haul the rest of the way up. However, this is risky if not done right or if the railway has any high/low spots during final haul-out.
  12. Anthony Kaduk

    Anthony Kaduk New Member

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    I believe you will find blocking instructions in the Ocean owners manual. They clearly spell out that you cannot support the entire weight of the boat on the keel and I believe recommend most of the weight be supported on the chines.
  13. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Float on, block, then roll it up. As long as their motor can handle the weight and the frame can handle the size it's no problem. And keep in mind that most of the weight is below the motors. That's where your main keel blocking is. The rest of the blocking is mainly for stability and to keep the bottom supported so it doesn't warp. Personally I prefer the rail over the travel lift. One Google search of "Travel lift accidents" will show you why, plus more support and less swing. Unfortunately they're not practical for most yards today.
  14. mapism

    mapism Member

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    Really? I'm amazed to hear that, particularly for plastic boats.
    The only boats for which I ever heard of builder's recommendations for distributing the load along BOTH the keel and the hard chines were some old(ish) triple planked mahogany hulls...