Click for Dockmate Click for Nordhavn Click for United Click for Walker Click for JetForums

53' Feadship

Discussion in 'Feadship Yacht' started by cgoodwin, Feb 5, 2008.

You need to be registered and signed in to view this content.
  1. david_japp

    david_japp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    london
    coelan

    I meant add ive had it on my 1938 Chris-craft for the past 8 years but it is mahogany not teak. In any event it has held up brilliantly and where there has been abrasion damage or cuffs, it has has been very easy to repair. FYI Coelan has amazing stretch capabilities .. i wont go as far as to say its a miracle product but it has been brilliant for me whereas traditional oil based vanish coatings have not> It is however VERY expensive and not the easiest to apply on vertical surfaces. Also, you must use the Coelan thinners and primers . Forgot to mention that somewhat weirdly, the gloss version is a very good non-slip finish (eg for my Chris-Craft's varnished deck) whereas the matt version is like ice.
  2. david_japp

    david_japp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    london
    coelan

    BTW best to use Coelan as a top coating of trad varnish rather than applying varnish over Coelan .
  3. david_japp

    david_japp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    london
    Coelan - Awlcraft

    Awlcraft is an Awlgrip 2 pack, hard coating and not at all like Coelan, which is a one coat flexible coating. I used Awlgrip system from start to finish (fillers, primers, topcoats etc) on the hull and painted areas of the superstructure but I was advised NOT to use Awlcraft clearcoat on the brightwork or paint because, unlike Coaelan, it has little or no stretch, and also unlike Coelan is very difficult to repair .
  4. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    Sorry, alwbrite.....
  5. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    David,
    The portholes on Tiki seem to be very similar to those on Brigand. On Brigand there are holes cut in the steel, a large fairing block is attached to the inside of the hull and in it is a tapered opening, larger where it meets the hole in the hull and smaller inside. On the inside of this fairing block is attached the actual port hole hatch with glass. Are yours the same? If so have you had issues with the coatings where the fairing block meets the hull cracking? Mine have been a nightmare.
  6. david_japp

    david_japp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    london
    Tiky portlights and rubbing strakes

    hiya
    Brigand's and Tiky's portlights sound similar which is hardly surprising as the Feadship yards tended to standardize their fittings and source them from the same supplier. In fact Tiky has 4 x 7.5" diam round portlights in the fwd cabin (which also have steel dead lights) and the oval porlights are 13" x 8" , all fitted to a recessed case welded to the hull. The case has a 3" approx flange on the inside that the porlights are bolted to. We removed and refurbished all the portllights including having them rechromed and fitting new seals . So far we haven't had problems with paint cracks at the joins but we grit blasted the entire hull back to bare metal and then applied the complete Awlgrip system under controlled humidly and temp conditions, so hopefully we have several years ahead without coatings issues . Ive attached pics of our portlights as well as as a pic taken from the exterior which not only shows the inset portlight casing but also the s/s rubbing strakes we corresponded about earlier.

    While writing, please can you describe your shaft tubes and bearings - ours were originally water lubricated but at some point the system was changed for a grease filled system, presumably to prevent further corrosion to the mild steel shaft and tubes. I replaced the heavily corroded shafts with S/s but haven't got the time or money to replace the tubes with a modern water lubricated system.

    the original stern bearings were cast iron (see pics) but we found one to be cracked on its flange so we replaced both in fabricated mild steel. These new bearings seized up on the shafts within minutes of our first running the engines with the boat in the water (apparently, with knowledge of hindsight, because mild steel doesn't like being in contact with stainless steel (too high a coefficient of friction) and also probably also because the lipseals were fitted the wrong way (so the bearings were not lubricated sufficiently) are are now being remade with phosphor bronze inner bearings. Im curious to know what system you have?
    best
    David

    Attached Files:

  7. david_japp

    david_japp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    london
    tiky stern bearings

    here is a pic of the old stern bearing with cracked flange

    Attached Files:

  8. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    Well in the early days of Feadship the association was now at all standardized and it seems that each yard had their own vendors. Your portlight description seems to make sense; a hole in the hull with a metal funnel shape welded to the hull and a flange on the inside to which is attached the portlight. Great design, welded and the materials expand and contract at the same rate. Mine on the other hand was not so brilliant a design. I have a hole in the steel hull and a fairing block of wood screwed to the hull, on the inside the portlight is then screwed to this fairing block. As the steel and wood expand and contract at different rates and the juncture of the wood and steel cracks constantly. My last move was to strip and dry all the wood, soak it in CPES, coat it in epoxy and two layers of fiberglass roving followed by epoxy paint - result... FAIL. Cracks at the juncture.

    My latest plan is to use a router blade I made to cut a groove at this juncture 4mm x 4mm and fill this groove with 3M 4000UV to provide a flexible joint at the juncture.

    If I had the interior stripped I would definitely remove the wood and mimic the design of your portlights...

    Attached Files:

  9. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    My shafts are completely different and are water lubricated. I'll see if I can take a photo.
  10. david_japp

    david_japp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    london
    Brigand

    Why not put a neoprene or other material seal between the wood and the steel...possibly recessed a millimetre or two to creat a natural break ?
  11. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    Because it would require complete disassembly of the interior of the vessel. The interior walls were installed over the fairing blocks, then the port lights, followed by the trim. Were I to go that far I would simply remove the fairing block entirely and replace it with steel as it should have been constructed originally.

    I am hoping that a groove filled with 4000UV will serve the same purpose and create an "expansion joint". Red in attached image.

    Attached Files:

  12. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    David,

    I recently came across a post you made regarding an aft deck awning. Having had similar thoughts myself I stumbled across the "Atalanta", the awning is of particular interest as is the general shape and style of the vessel, sort of a cross between yours and mine.

    Most of the photos are promo shots for charter but there are a few interesting ones. On this one you should not the black filled line where the teak shrunk and rather than trying to spline it they simply filled it. Not a bad choice but given the horizontal direction of the grain I think I would have gone for a spline.

    Attached Files:

  13. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    Here you can see the awning from the side

    Attached Files:

  14. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    A quartering view

    Attached Files:

  15. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    And a view from the deck

    Attached Files:

  16. cgoodwin

    cgoodwin Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    USA
    In this shot you can also notice where the shrinkage has been dealt with using black caulk.

    Attached Files:

  17. david_japp

    david_japp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    london
    Atalanta

    Hi
    I know Atalanta as I viewed her on behalf of a friend who considered buying her when she was for sale in the UK 3 or 4 years ago. I'm not sure if the seam you show is in fact one that has opened up or that has been been left like that filled black mastic to allow for movement. Either way Atalanta has a lot of black seams and they look fine.

    As for awnings , I am not a great fan of awnings on on fixed s/s frames. They change the visual look of the boat and are susceptible to wind damage and UV degradation . Accordingly, on Tiky we have a system where we fit extension poles that are the same diameter as the stanchions into s/ fittings mounted in the handrail. The bottom of the extensions have 6" solid spigots that drop into the hole and there is a threaded bolt in the top of the stanchion which tightens up against the spigot to hold the extension rigid. We attach a lightweight a mesh awning made of Soltis 86 the poles. The mesh obscures 80% of the light while allowing air and rain to pass through, so doesn't get grubby or hold puddles and sag under the weight of rain water. The awning and the poles take less than 10 mins to fit: remove and when fitted looks a lot better than in the photo I've attached and best of all it's only up when needed.

    Attached Files:

  18. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Messages:
    2,817
    Location:
    St Augustine, Fl and Thailand
    Atalanta

    Nice looking vessel,.... might have made a nice looking motorsailer
  19. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Messages:
    2,817
    Location:
    St Augustine, Fl and Thailand
    Sorry if I offend anyone, but I think that awning looks a bit 'tacky'. I think you could take a look thru a number of designs that have been done on big power yachts and come up with something a lot more appealing for a 'removable awning',...maybe something along the line of the 'umbrella style' awnings, or tent style?
  20. david_japp

    david_japp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    london
    awnings

    no offense taken - I did look at and and consider many alternatives. Im not really a fan of umbrella type shades as I think they look rather domestic and inappropriate on a boat, but we we do carry a small one rectangular parasol .
    In fact Tiky looks best with no awning and I certainly didn't want a heavy fixed structure. most of the time she wont need an awning as the Pilothouse does in any event creates some shade over the fixed seating aft of the PH . however, there are times, when say at anchor and people are lying out in the aft deck and some extra shading is required, and IMHO the simplest, neatest, least obtrusive solution was to do what we have done ...as mentioned it does look a lot better in the flesh, so to speak. If we get fed up with it we can always have a permanent/semi permanent solid s/s frame made with a curve in it, which will attach to the s/s fittings let into the handrail