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1st post, recommendations on flybridge 55-62 mid 2000s era.

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by Neptunus56, Mar 16, 2019 at 1:16 PM.

  1. Neptunus56

    Neptunus56 New Member

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    Hey gang, 1st time posting, looks like I made an account last year to surf and have spent many hours reading up on threads and with a similar post having some activity lately thought I would see if anyone has input on which boat would best serve my needs.

    Latest boat was 47 ft and sold twin Yanmars express cruiser and looking to move up to the 55 to 62 range which while a large leap in size from 47 I do no think is out of the realm and running the boat with just the other half and I. Would have guest(s) onboard many of the times, some with experience, some with none, but would not want to need the help in normal conditions just to run the boat and having a captain or crew is not in the cards at this point (not opposed to a captain at first if dictated by insurance).

    I personally love the darker cherry wood era that seems to have gone to the wayside when things fell apart in 08/09 so I seem to move to searches in the 2004 to 2007 range and with a budget in the 500K range opens up many boats and am moving to the go and see them in person phase. Would be plying great lakes to FL with the odd jaunt to the Bahamas. Despite some (less than desirable) movement in this style of boat when running off idle many of the hours would just be enjoying the ride at 8 knots, a single engine trawler just does not work for me. Mild interest in powered cats in the 44 range seems to give the space of a 56 in monohull but the beam is tough to deal with in my area in tight marinas.

    Did a car ride to the East coast to Kent Island and spent 3 or 4 days there looking at Meridan Pilothouse 59 and Carver aft cabins and motor yachts of various lengths, 54ish and came away from that trip knowing that I would have to drop those names on quality issues personally, they just do not age well and from reading from those that run boats for a living (on yf) they feel the same way. Leaving that weekend I spent some time checking out an Aicon 56 Flybridge before heading home which has pushed me to the Italian/British searching of Manhattan 56, Azimut 55, Fairline 58, Marquis 59, Neptunus 56 (which for some reason I choose as a account name).

    I for some reason like the galley lower as a standalone "room" not galley down more forward en route to the 2 or 3 staterooms. Both the Manhattan and Fairline have optional single berths off the galley or at a utility room which just seems like a great idea when spending serious time on a boat of that size (meaning small) needing as much room as possible for provisioning and if need the guest space for a child or single when have a large gang onboard overnight.

    Seems like a silly reason to choose a boat for a preferred galley location but was wondering if anyone has experience with a lower galley more mid ship as a standalone galley and if the layout works well and general recommendations on those models. The Marquis has all but been ruled out as a 'top shelf' Carver, wondering where the Neptunus fits in to the mix compared to the Mut and Sunseeker. Reading over and over that Azimut is the Bayliner of Italy is starting to resonate a bit, ha......

    thanks for any insight, quite the lengthy 1st post I suppose! Attached pic of salon of SS 56 with starboard side galley down.

    Attached Files:

  2. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    In that age, I would skip Azimut as you will have lots of electrical issues and lots of frustrating trying to find parts for them in or around the Great lakes. Neptunus builds a good boat and that era was good for them, I'd go for the 62' though. The Sunseeker 63' Manhattan would be a good choice also, but would lean to the Neptunus simply because they could be had with fiberglass hardtops and enclosures and the Great Lakes air temperature can be chilly. Also Neptunus did a lot of dark cherry. Also for your requirements, I'd make sure you can get them down to 20'2" air draft fairly easily to do the Erie Canal. I'm not familiar with the 56's in either brand, but that size is a lot easier to handle getting to and in the great lakes than 62-63'.
  3. Neptunus56

    Neptunus56 New Member

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    Thanks Captain J, your name is one I have been following on input and appreciate it. Mentally the leap from 56 to 62 seems to be my limit from able to run with Mrs. under normal conditions on the 56 to perhaps not so much with the 62 but that is online research and checking out boats in person but not running them at all. With the 47 I would run with just the Mrs. near anytime with no thrusters and ran from CT back to the great lakes with little issue on a near 1000 mile run, the leap up in size may be more a mental challenge. 1 question when applying the 10% per year of boat cost to maintain would that number hold true for a smaller boat of 56 to 62 size where a captain and crew costs are not a part of the 10% annually? also rather hands on and would perform much service myself and actually enjoy doing oddly, as long as floating at the time!

    thanks again.
  4. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    A 62' is a bit more to handle and if you're uncomfortable stay in the mid 55' range. I looked at a 52' Manhattan (2013 ish) that was extremely nicely laid out. It had 3 very usable staterooms and a very capable layout. When you get to 62' fenders and lines get a lot heavier and bulkier and things like going through locks are a lot more demanding with the additional weight and windage. If a 55' meets your needs, stay there.
  5. KoffeeCruising

    KoffeeCruising New Member

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    I was in same position as you and last year bought a 2007 54’ Pama Flybridge, which hits the sweet spot of big enough, but not too big. I’m from Midwest and bought /keep the boat in Florida. I made a big jump from 24’ Wakeboard boat to the 54. I earned my 6pack Captains License but had a Captain with me for my first few months to really get the seamanship and handling down. Our cruising grounds are the ICW, East coast, Bahamas, and the intent to do the loop. Now I run the boat myself - and invested into a Yacht Controller which is absolutely worth the money for the peace of mind and ability to single hand with minimal assistance.

    It came with 2 queen staterooms and 2 heads with stand up showers, we converted an office into a functional bunk room so we can comfortably sleep 6. We live on the Flybridge but the salon is great when it’s cold, windy or rainy. It has a great sunpad on the bow and a nice covered aft cockpit with a large lazzarette underneath.

    Few people have heard of the brand Pama, which built in China instead of Tiawan, but they are really well built. I have Hull #11, Volvo D-9s which cruise economically 5GPH at 8-9mph, but cruise easily at 20-24mph (30-40GPH)when you want to get across to Bahamas, down to Key West, or up to Cape Canaveral to see a rocket launch like we did Friday. Since May 2018 we have put 200 hours on the engines and 46 Cruising days.

    Our galley is up, but open; really like the flow and visibility.

    You may want to come to FL to check out used boats at the boat shows.

    Good luck in your search
  6. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    The big problem with a galley down, is if you actually cook meals you are handing food up to someone else and constantly up and down...….also, while cooking you are in your own little cave. Galley up allows you to interact with others while cooking and easy to provision and easy to transfer meals to the table. If you don't cook often, it's a moot point.
  7. Zud

    Zud Member

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    Neptunus56 - I own one, a 2002 sedanbridge (canvas top) we are very happy with our purchase (2016). Antenna down we had no issues on the Erie or Oswego Canals...close but she fit during high water springtime transit. She is a handful in a cross wind while trying to dock but a neophyte like me got it done more than once. No issues to report as of yet since the purchase. New batteries this year, but hey thats the way it goes. We are just down the lakes from you...Erie, PA Good luck with your search !!!
  8. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Mid to Late 2000s Searay 58 sedan bridge was a very good boat (so was the 52' from the same era).
  9. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    The 58 SD was a fair boat and the 52.
    Skippy J and I have never agreed on this for many years.
    I will say this, it will hold together better than some others.
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019 at 11:44 PM

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