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1985 46┬┤Bertram Sportfish - Electronics/Display Choices

Discussion in 'Bertram Yacht' started by Navatech, Apr 11, 2013.

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  1. Navatech

    Navatech New Member

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    Mar 27, 2013
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    Hollywood, FL
    Actually, I believe that at the time the stuff that was considered the cat's whiskers was by a company called Decca. British I believe. And, at the time, unless there was reduced visibility, they saved costs by not operating the unit. This happened to be a very clear night so the radar would have been off.

    Also, at the time, the SOP was for a lookout on each wing plus the watch keeping mate in the bridge. People were cheaper then newfangled expensive technology :D

    Part of the duties of a good Captain (as well as Chief Mate, Chief Engineer and First Engineer). I had a good time but got tired of the box carriers (you're never more then 12-18 hours in port). Almost as bad as being on a tanker (one end of a pipe on one side and the same on the other side).
  2. Navatech

    Navatech New Member

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    Location:
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    New technology

    Talking about accepting new technologies, that very same ship was one of the first ships in that company that was fully automated - Certified for Unattended Engine room.

    HOWEVER, the Chief Engineer (a very old school geezer) didn't trust the system and had a regular watch kept. However, as the ship was automated manning levels were lower then usual. For example, we didn't have a 4th Engineer (the cadet was responsible for his chores) and no Wipers. Just a Donkey Man (equivalent to Bosun on deck) and 2 Motor Men (equivalent to AB's on deck).

    However, between running night watches and the regular maintenance work the engine staff was seriously overworked. But the old ChEng wouldn't budge. In fact, the company retired him eventually as nobody wanted to serve under him and he wouldn't accept a signon on an older ship.

    The analog brain of the automated system wouldn't even fit into my Bertram. Not even if cut up in pieces. It probably weighted more then my Bertram too.

    It was fun while it lasted but I was happy to retrain in IT in the early 90's. More profitable too. When my dad was a ChEng his salary was 4-5 times the average. With plenty of paid shore time. When I was there the ChEng's salary was 2-3 times the average with a lot less paid shore time. It has gotten worse since then.

    The one salvation US seagoing personnel have is the Jones act. Without that I doubt very much that there would be a US merchant marine. There certainly wouldn't be any US seagoing personnel.
  3. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Actually the old school Furuno radar that your boat probably has with a CRT monitor is actually much better in many aspects (same for the old school CRT Furuno or Simrad fishfinders) than any of the new technology radars or fishfinders. The lcd screens do not display the actual shape of the signal from the transducer or radar. With crt, I can pretty much glance at the radar mark or fishfinder mark and tell you what type of vessel it is and direction......or even what type of fish it is, just by the mark on the screen. It's much harder, if impossible to do with LCD screens most of the time. Some of the newer technology with the new radar's is better on the other hand, like AIS that you can't do with an old school crt unit.
  4. bcollier

    bcollier New Member

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    Tampa Bay
    All this new stuff / old school reminds me when I ran a rigging shop years ago. We had a government contract to manufacture stainless wire rope pendants using a zinc poured socket on each end. So, the government QA guy is standing there to witness the socket pours and after the shop foreman heated the zinc sufficiently and drawn off the impurities on top he takes an oak stick, about 2"x2" about 18" long and sticks it into the zinc. The govt guys eyes got real big and steps in to ask what he was doing. The foreman explained that when you withdraw the oak and it fashes then immediately smoldered he knew the zinc was at the proper temp to pour. The govt guy stopped all of this insisting we buy an expensive pyrometer, which we did. Week or so later we are again ready and govt guy is real happy to see the pyrometer in the zinc and sees the temp come up and says to our shop foreman "looks like its at temperature" when the shop foreman reaches over, grabs his oak stick, dips it in the zinc then pulls it out to see it flash then smolder and says "now we are ready." Point is, if all the lights go out I guess you can still use the oak stick, but there isn't a rigging shop in the country today that doesn't have a pyrometer. In fact, I take that back.. Most pours today are resin! Times do change... My opinion... And only that, it all comes down to redundancy. Paper charts and electronic charts can and should co-exist, flux gate and a trusty floating dial make lots of sense, and yes, with a pyrometer installed to read generator exhaust temp I still like to put my hand in the water to feel the temp. Of course we could go back to counting the knots on a rope tossed over the side.

    As with most forums, lots of guys have considerable commercial boat, flying or prior Navy experience. Well, I was drafted into the Army, have to buy a ticket to fly, and am a life long recreational boater. Nothing wrong with those. But, it doesn't make me stupid because I embrace newer technology as long as I keep things in perspective. I think that's what Navatech is trying to get across. I stated earlier on a different thread that I'm going all Maretron digital (it is 9 - 32 volt now not 110) and my Detroit 4/53's will love me for it. Then again, a camera in the engine room trained on my mechanical gauge cluster will let me verify my Actisense/Maretron/NEMA 2000 set up until I'm ready to train that camera on something new.